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> Using Dna Testing In Genealogy, Does the oral/written history match?
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Camac
Posted: 15-Jul-2008, 09:49 AM
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Gentlemen;

DNA testing is fine and all but there is a much simpler way of finding your relatives. You take your surname find which Clan, Tribe, or group your associated with and guess what somewhere down the line you are all related and your all cousins. Simple. I'm a Campbell so as far as I'm concerned all the other Campbells are my cousins . Who knows I might even be related to Queen Elizabeth as she is related to the Stewards who are related to the Bruce who married his sister off to a Campbell. I kinda like the sound of His Royal Highness Prince Camac. Enough joking around. As I said DNA testing is fine and all but it has its' limits. I watched 60 mins when they did a segment on it . A black woman from NJ and a white cattle rancher from Missouri were cousins. They also tried to trace her lineage back to Africa and it ended up she was either from Sierra Leone, Gambia, or Nigeria. Most blacks in the US. can trace their origin to the bulge of Africa because that is where the slave trade was established.


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UlsterScotNutt 
Posted: 15-Jul-2008, 10:06 AM
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It is even simpler than that, we all are descendents of one person, all cousins , all related.
Heck, after the last ice age you had about 60,000 individuals living in Europe major and now you have 300 million and the vast majority are not immigrants but of the 60k already there.

DNA testing is a tool.

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MacEoghainn 
Posted: 15-Jul-2008, 11:40 AM
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QUOTE (Camac @ 15-Jul-2008, 10:49 AM)
.....I'm a Campbell........

Camac.

Camac,

That explains a lot, you're an "evil" Campbell! laugh.gif If the Ewings are really part of Clan MacEwen then....."Give us our land back"!!!

QUOTE
Swene MacEwen, 9th and last of Otter (the last Chief), granted, in 1432, lands of Otter to Duncan Campbell of Lochow in repayment for overdue loans, and resigned the Barony of Otter to James I. It was returned to him until his death with remainder to Celestine, son and heir of Duncan Campbell. In 1493, James V confirmed the barony of Otter to Colin Campbell, Second Earl of Argyll and thereafter Otter remained in possession of the Campbells.

The manner in which the Clan MacEwen lands were lost suggests that Swene MacEwen was a victim of the Campbell facility to exploit the law to their own benefit at the detriment of simpler neighbors.

Without lands, the MacEwens became a broken clan and found their way to many districts. Many settled in the lands of their cousins an neighbors - the MacLachlans. A large number are known to have settled in Lennox County while others went further afield to Lochaber, Perth, Skye and the Lowlands, including Galloway. Other MacEwens stayed where they were swearing allegiance to the Earl of Argyll, some eventually becoming hereditary bards and sennachies to the Campbell Chiefs of Glenorchy. Finally, other MacEwens settled along the shores of Loch Lomond, probably before the end of the 15th century. Records from around 1513 indicate that the MacEwens had been pretty well dispersed from their homeland.
From the: The Story of Clan MacEwen


Seriously,

DNA testing is only one tool in the Genealogists (amateur or professional) toolbox. DNA testing is still really in its infancy. For instance in the Ewing DNA study I have a very distant cousin in Michigan, for which there is no possible way we are related closer than 10 generations, and yet we have identical at 37 marker DNA results (I call him my "Doppleganger").


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Camac
Posted: 15-Jul-2008, 12:36 PM
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QUOTE (MacEoghainn @ 15-Jul-2008, 11:40 AM)
QUOTE (Camac @ 15-Jul-2008, 10:49 AM)
.....I'm a Campbell........

Camac.

Camac,

That explains a lot, you're an "evil" Campbell! laugh.gif If the Ewings are really part of Clan MacEwen then....."Give us our land back"!!!

QUOTE
Swene MacEwen, 9th and last of Otter (the last Chief), granted, in 1432, lands of Otter to Duncan Campbell of Lochow in repayment for overdue loans, and resigned the Barony of Otter to James I. It was returned to him until his death with remainder to Celestine, son and heir of Duncan Campbell. In 1493, James V confirmed the barony of Otter to Colin Campbell, Second Earl of Argyll and thereafter Otter remained in possession of the Campbells.

The manner in which the Clan MacEwen lands were lost suggests that Swene MacEwen was a victim of the Campbell facility to exploit the law to their own benefit at the detriment of simpler neighbors.

Without lands, the MacEwens became a broken clan and found their way to many districts. Many settled in the lands of their cousins an neighbors - the MacLachlans. A large number are known to have settled in Lennox County while others went further afield to Lochaber, Perth, Skye and the Lowlands, including Galloway. Other MacEwens stayed where they were swearing allegiance to the Earl of Argyll, some eventually becoming hereditary bards and sennachies to the Campbell Chiefs of Glenorchy. Finally, other MacEwens settled along the shores of Loch Lomond, probably before the end of the 15th century. Records from around 1513 indicate that the MacEwens had been pretty well dispersed from their homeland.
From the: The Story of Clan MacEwen


Seriously,

DNA testing is only one tool in the Genealogists (amateur or professional) toolbox. DNA testing is still really in its infancy. For instance in the Ewing DNA study I have a very distant cousin in Michigan, for which there is no possible way we are related closer than 10 generations, and yet we have identical at 37 marker DNA results (I call him my "Doppleganger").

MacEoghainn;

Sorry Old Boy, you should have read the fine print.Campbell comes from the Gaelic Cam Buel (Crooked Mouth) emphasis on the Crooked. They didn't get to be the Largest, Wealthiest, and most Powerful Clan by being Mr. Nice. They also took lessons from the MacArthur (which I was adopted by). Steal the nickers off your grandma they would with her still in them. angel_not.gif rolleyes.gif laugh.gif

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TamiMcLeod 
Posted: 29-Aug-2008, 11:42 AM
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My family has been doing DNA for years for the MacLeods. The clan saids that many people who came under the protection of a castle, took the name.. like smiths came to say McInnes castle and took their name out of honor cause they gave protection, and have no McIness in their blood..

there are so many people who don't even have Scottish blood in them and have the last name of a Scottish name.

Also so many people say they are a pure scott.. when it was in the blood 5 or more gen back.. that doesn't make then a pure scott and maybe even makes them no scott. I see this alot. If you live in Scotland, then you know Scotts do not call other people with a bit of scott in them, Scotsman.. I
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heartsong 
  Posted: 24-Sep-2014, 07:51 AM
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It's interesting with all of the advances in Genealogy that no one has posted on here in a while. I recently did the ancestry.com DNA profiling and was only mildly surprised at what it said. I know my moms family is from southern Germany/Black Forest region which is the 50% listed below. I also know my grandfathers, grandfather is from Essex, England so 28% is not surprising either.
The smaller amounts come from distance between me and any ancestor that could easily have immigrated to one of the more prominent DNA marker regions I carry.
European
Europe West 50%
Great Britain 28%
Ireland 6%
Italy/Greece 6%
Iberian Peninsula 3%
European Jewish 3%
Scandinavia 2%
Finland/Northwest Russia < 1%
West Asia
Caucasus 2%

The only thing they missed in the ancestor that is Native American, but since not everyone in every family carries the same dna, one of my parents, siblings, cousins, uncles, etc might have those genes show up if they have the test done. All I have to do is convince them to spit into a little cup.

Now all I have to do is figure out who my Irish, Italian/Greek ancestors are. laugh.gif

Here's a basic video on how the test worked.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4kLUoam8ik
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munchkin5450 
Posted: 26-Sep-2014, 07:34 AM
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Very interesting. I've wondered about the DNA testing...like how accurate is it; what do you need to do to have the testing done; is it expensive; and how long does it take to get the results.

My maternal grandfather started tracing that side of our family tree many years ago. When he passed, his son (my uncle) took up where he left off. My sister now has the accumulated information and was able to make the final connections with the help of ancestry.com. We know and have documentation that two of my ancestors came over on the Mayflower and were married by Capt. John Smith. My sister told me that she has an unbroken line all the way to Charlemagne!

She has only been able to go back a few generations for my father's side, though. She doesn't have the wealth of information available.

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heartsong 
Posted: 26-Sep-2014, 12:18 PM
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I was also wondering about accuracy, but it seems accurate based on what I know for general regions of my ethnic groups. As they collect more and more DNA it will probably enable more specific areas to be determined.

I wish I was able to trace any of my lines that far. I was able to connect with my paternal grandfathers male line, before I did the DNA test. It goes from Essex, England in the 1650s until 1850s. I'm glad I didn't have to go through all the records, I just have to read them for interesting facts.

The maternal lines of each branch are harder to find, since it seems like all the women in my family went by their middle names.
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