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Elspeth 
Posted: 11-Aug-2005, 05:24 AM
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I am discovering the joy of cooking with herbs. I grew this summer thyme, oregano and rosemary. And, of course garlic goes in most everything I can think of.

What I need is a good list of herbs and what they are used for. Complicated recipies are beyond what I can manage between football/cheerleading/baseball/marching band/work schedules. But I have found cooking with herbs can upgrade any meal and is just dang fun. smile.gif

So, shadows, got a good list of herbs and their uses? And any tips on indoor growing as winter approaches. Perhaps cooking with herbs can become its own subcatagory? cool.gif


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Shadows 
Posted: 11-Aug-2005, 04:44 PM
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Elspeth I have been growing and cooking with herbs for so long I do not even think about others not using them!
We will let this topic you started serve as the offical cooking with herbs section for now.

I will look through my archieves for links to sites that reference herbs in cooking and post them here... I also will recommend some good herbal books... give me a few days to gather it all in one place.

I think others here will benefit and find enjoyment from this topic... good idea!


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Elspeth 
Posted: 12-Aug-2005, 08:21 AM
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Thanks shadows! I look forward to your posts.
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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Aug-2005, 07:49 AM
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Here is a quick and easy summer recipe using basil and tomato...

Recipe Name: BASIL TOMATOES
Category: SALADS
Serves: 4

3 Medium tomato
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp basil
1 tsp vinegar

Combine oil, vinegar, basil, salt and pepper. Add tomatoes and evenly coat. Add pinch garlic powder. Chill at least 2 hours.

--------

I add crumbled blue cheese or parmesian chesse when I make this.
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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Aug-2005, 07:53 AM
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One of the books in my collection is:

Early American Herb Recipes by Alice Cooke Brown
Library of Congress Catalog card number: 66-17772

This book also cover medicinal uses of herbs.
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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Aug-2005, 07:57 AM
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Since you grew Thyme this year you should try this recipe. I can be converted to cook in your oven at home, we use this one while camping.

Recipe Name: BAKED ONIONS WITH THYME
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 6

SOURCE SHADOWS

6 medium red or white onions (3 1/2 lb)
3 Tblsp fine-quality extra-virgin olive oil
10 fresh thyme sprigs or
1 Tsp. dried thyme
Fine sea salt to taste
1/2 Cup Chianti or other dry red wine
1/4 Cup water

Oil and Preheat dutch oven to 400F (hot).

Cut a slice from both ends of each onion, then halve onions crosswise. Discard outer layers from onions, leaving about a 2 1/2-inch diameter.

Arrange onions, trimmed ends down in dutch oven. Drizzle with oil.

Remove leaves from 2 thyme sprigs and sprinkle over onions. Season with sea salt and pepper, then scatter remaining 8 sprigs over onions. Pour wine over onions.

Bake, with majority of coals on lid, basting with pan juices twice during baking, 40 minutes. Add water to oven and bake until onions are browned and tender, about 50 minutes more. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Makes 6 (first course) servings

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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Aug-2005, 07:59 AM
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Here is another using Thyme:

Recipe Name: THYME-ROASTED POTATO W/ BALSAMIC VINEGAR
Category: VEGETABLES
Serves: 6

2 Pound small red-skinned potatoes, scrubbed, halved
Olive oil
4 Tblsp chopped fresh thyme
2 Tsp. garlic salt
1 1/2 Cup white or regular balsamic vinegar
3 Tblsp sugar

Preheat oven to 400F. Place potatoes in large bowl. Generously coat
potatoes with olive oil. Sprinkle with 3 tablespoons
thyme and garlic salt. Toss to coat. Coat large rimmed baking sheet with
olive oil. Arrange potatoes, cut side down, on sheet. Roast potatoes
until tender and golden brown, turning every 15 minutes and roasting about 45 minutes total.
Meanwhile, stir vinegar and sugar in heavy small saucepan over high heat
until sugar dissolves. Boil until liquid is reduced to 2/3 cup, about 10
minutes. Mix in remaining 1 tablespoon thyme.
Transfer potatoes to plates. Drizzle some balsamic syrup over potatoes.
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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Aug-2005, 08:02 AM
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Here is one using Rosemary, this one is very, very good!

Recipe Name: SEARED VENISON W ROSEMARY AND CHERRIES
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 4

1 1/2 Tsp. teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
1 Tsp. coriander seeds
1 Large garlic clove
1 1/2 Tsp. teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 Pound venison tenderloin
1/4 Cup dry red wine
1/4 Cup dried tart cherries
2/3 Cup beef broth
1/2 Cup water
1 Tsp. cornstarch
2 Tblsp black-currant jelly

Grind 1 teaspoon rosemary with coriander seeds and garlic with a mortar and pestle to make a paste, then stir in 1/2 teaspoon oil (this can be done ahead of time at home).

Pat venison dry and put in a bowl, then rub with paste. Season well with pepper, then cover and chill 20 minutes.

Preheat dutch oven to 450F ( hot ).

Add remaining teaspoon oil, tilting oven to coat evenly. Season venison well with salt, then brown, turning once, about 6 minutes total.

Roast venison ( majority of coals on lid ) until an instant-read thermometer inserted diagonally into center registers 125F, 7 to 10 minutes. Transfer meat to a plate and keep warm.

Add wine and cherries to oven and deglaze by boiling over moderately high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits. Stir together broth, water, cornstarch, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon rosemary in a bowl and add to oven. Simmer, stirring, until mixture is thickened, about 5 minutes. Whisk in jelly and salt and pepper to taste.

Cut venison into 1/4-inch-thick slices and serve with sauce.

You can subsitiute beef for the venison, but not quit the same.
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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Aug-2005, 08:10 AM
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Here is one more, then I will go look for my herb books and post the titles here.

Recipe Name: LIME ROSEMARY ROAST CHICKEN
Category: POULTRY
Serves: 6

SOURCE SHADOWS

1 Whole roasting chicken, about 7 pounds
3 Whole limes
3 Tblsp dried rosemary, lightly crushed
3 Tblsp butter
5 Clove garlic
salt and pepper to taste

This chicken can be made at home, on the grill, or camping in a dutch oven.

Preheat oven to 400 f ***

Wash chicken & pat dry. Place the chicken in a shallow baking pan , in dutch oven or on a platter if grilling.
Season liberally with salt, pepper & rosemary; season the skin, under the breast skin & in the cavity. Peel 3 cloves of garlic and crush. Place in the birds cavity. Slice other 2 cloves of garlic and place under skin with other seasonings. Wash limes. Heat briefly in the microwave ( about 30 seconds ) if camping just bruise the limes and proceed; remove & roll several times on table top or counter. This step will maximize the juice in the limes. With a toothpick or skewer, pierce two of the limes all over several dozen times. Place 2 limes in the cavity of the chicken. Place the chicken in the hot oven. After first 15 minutes, reduce heat to 325. Bake for an additional 1 1/2 hours. During the last 30-45 minutes, baste chicken with the juice of one lime mixed with melted butter and some of the pan juices.. Remove from oven. Let stand for 10 minutes or so. Remove limes, carve & serve.


*** To cook on grill:
Follow directions as above but sew the cavity shut and cook over indirect heat, turning as needed. Cooking on a rotisserie works well. Baste more fequently.

*** To cook in a dutch oven:
Follow directions above..place majority of coals on lid, baste more frequently. Start oven out hot then move to cooler part of fire.

Notes: Cooking with the skin on produces a very moist chicken. If
limiting fat intake is an issue, remove skin before eating.


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ghost 
Posted: 15-Oct-2005, 04:40 AM
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QUOTE (Elspeth @ 11-Aug-2005, 02:24 AM)
What I need is a good list of herbs and what they are used for.

Herbs: leaves of low-growing shrubs that usually grow in the temperate zone. Herbs are at their best when they are young and freshly picked.

Any herbs you buy sealed in a jar should ideally be replaced every six months, less if they have been stored near a heat source or in the sunlight.

Common Herbs:

***************************************************
Basil-
leaves and stems of the basil plant(mint family). Most have green leaves, but opal basil is purple. Lemon basil and cinnamon basil have green leaves with strong fragrances and flavours. Sweet, mint-like, clove taste.

Cooking uses- Medittereranean dishes. Italian Pesto. Pasta. Tomato sauces. Seafood. Vegetables.

Forms- fresh, dried, flaked

General health Benefits- Digestive aid.

****************************************************

Bay-

Leaves of the bay laurel tree. Two main varieties are Turkish(1 to 2 inch oval leaves) and the Californian(narrow, 2 to 3 inch leaves). The Turkish bay leaves have a more subtle flavour. Pungent, sharp, bitter taste.

Cooking uses- Soups. Stews. Pickling. Seafood. (Most people remove the leaf before serving but I don't!)

Forms- Whole, dried.

General health benefits- Helps against Dyspepsia, loss of appetite, colds, viral infections, low blood sugar and migraines.

****************************************************
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ghost 
Posted: 17-Oct-2005, 01:35 AM
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Chives-

Leaves of the chive plant (onion family). Bright green, long, hollow, thin leaves. May have sharp onion or garlic flavour. Attractive garnish for many savory foods.

Cooking uses: Garnish, soups, stews, fish, eggs, cheese, salads.(usually added towards the end of the cooking period to maintain flavour)

Forms: Fresh, dried.

General health benefits: appetite enhancer, stimulates the immune system.

***********************************************

Chervil-

Leaves of the chive plant (parsley family). Curly dark green leaves. Mild, parsley flavoured with a hint of anise. Helps to bring out the flavour in other herbs.

Cooking uses: Pasta, vegetables, cheese, fish, veal, soups.(usually added towards the end of the cooking period to maintain flavour)

Forms: Fresh, dried.

General health benefits: Diuretic, expectorant, relief for excema, lowers blood pressure.

***********************************************

Cilantro(coriander)-

Leaves of the coriander(cilantro) plant carrot family). Bright green leaves and stems with a strong fragrance. Pungent and parsley-like with a hint of citrus.

Cooking uses: Asian, Carribean and Mexican dishes. Vegetables, meats, poultry, salads.

Form: Fresh

General health benefits: Appetite stimulant, digestive aid.

************************************************
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ghost 
Posted: 17-Oct-2005, 12:41 PM
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Dill-

Leaves and seeds of the dill plant(parsley family). This annual herb grows up to height of about 3 feet and has feathery green leaves(dill weed). Mild, somewhat sour flavour. Heating brings out the flavour of the dill seed, which is stronger and more pungent than that of the leaves. Fresh dill quickly looses fragrance suring heating, so should only be added toward the end of cooking.

Cooking uses: Pickling, meats, seafood, salads, eggs, sauces.

Forms: Fresh, dried.

General health benefits: Digestive aid, soothes the nerves, relieves halitosis.

*******************************************


Fennel-

Leaves and stems of the fennel plant. Oval, green or yellowish-brown dried fruit(parsley family). Flavour is like anise, but sweeter and lighter. Seeds are available whole and ground.

Cooking uses: Pickling, sauces, salads, eggs, soups, seafood, sausages, garnish, potatoes.

Forms: Seed.

General health benefits: Anti-spasmodic, relieves intestinal cramps and stomach pain, relieves a stuffy nose.

********************************************




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stoirmeil 
Posted: 17-Oct-2005, 01:28 PM
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These are great! Thanks, Eventide!

Fennel tea is also a good throat gargle in a pinch, for a sore throat or laryngitis, because of the demulcent quality. (Fennel plus marsh mallow/althea officianalis is excellent for laryngitis). It is also said to be a good tea for nursing mothers, because it increases the milk flow (="galactogogue"), and also gets into the milk in trace amounts and can help settle a colicky baby's stomach.

I'm a great fan of fennel. I always add some fennel seed when I make bean or lentil soups. Fresh fennel stalks in season are fun to surprise little kids with, too, because it looks like celery, but tastes like licorice!
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ghost 
Posted: 17-Oct-2005, 04:41 PM
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smile.gif Thanks Stoirmeil.

There are so many benefits to herbs, most of them are unadulterated throughout the centuries. With the world getting smaller every year, so many of these products are easy to find on the market.



Marjoram-

Leaves of the marjoram plant(mint family). Oval, inch-long, pale green leaves. Mild, sweet flavour that tastes like oregano. Wild marjoram is another name for oregano. Add marjoram at the end of the cooking time so the essence does not dissipate.

Cooking uses:Meats(lamb and veal), poultry, vegetables, sauces and salad dressings.

Forms: whole, ground.

General health benefits: Mild tonic, toothaches and relief for dyspepsia(heart burn)

*********************************************


Mint-

Leaf of spearmint plant. Sweet, cool aftertaste. Bright green leaves with purple tinged stems. There are over 30 species of mint(ie. spearmint, peppermint) Peppermint is more pungent than spearmint. Peppery flavour with a sweet cool aftertaste. Mint is used in sweet and savoury dishes and in drinks.

Cooking use: Tea, lamb, sauces, fruit dishes, baking, desserts.

Forms:Dried, flaked, extract.

General health benefits: Digestive aid, breath freshener, colds, flu, headaches, insomnia.

*********************************************

Oregano-

Leaves of the oregano plant. Similar to marjoram but is not as sweet and has a stronger, more pungent flavour and aroma. Larger, coarser plant with pink or white flowers. Mediterranean oregano is milder than the Mexican variety. Aromatic, slightly bitter.

Cooking use: Tomato sauces, chili powder, BBQ sauces, soups, eggs, Italian and Mexican dishes.

Forms:Fresh, flaked.

General health benefits: Leaf infusion relieves nervous headaches.

*********************************************

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Shadows 
Posted: 17-Oct-2005, 05:10 PM
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I see all the standard uses for each herb ( thank you Eventide ), yet that limits what flavors you can achieve.

I see you list mint for Lamb, have you ever tried it with a beef roast? Turns out great ( I have a recipe for English Roast Beef somewhere on here that does just that. ) Have you tried combinations of the different herbs, rosemary and marjorum make a wonderful combination with poultry, beef and pork... through in some sage and you will be amazed.

Vanilla bean or extract with ham makes an interesting flavor combination... butter, vanilla and ham steak fried... oh talk about eating good!

Don't limit your creativity by using the old standards... remember flavors and use your imagination to blend and create, be brave!
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