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> Where Did The Celts Origionally Come From?
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DesertRose 
Posted: 04-Jun-2005, 09:21 PM
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sorry to post a new topic, but I was asked this question and could not answer. I have read some of the threads in here, but I don't see where the Celtic people orginally came from. Can someone answer this question for me so I can pass it along to my mother in law? Is the answer in here already and I just missed it somehow? unsure.gif Many thanks!


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gaberlunzie 
Posted: 04-Jun-2005, 10:03 PM
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Rose, an article Paul posted here might be a good place to start for you. You'll find it here:
http://www.celticradio.net/php/forums/inde...?showtopic=2261.


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Viriato 
Posted: 05-Jun-2005, 07:23 AM
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Hi there!

I am the new "kid in the block" from Galiza (Cail-laech?).

I'm mad about my roots I since I moved to UK I'm discovering that we got it all wrong. We always thought that we came from Eire, but I've discovered that is the other way roung. Is it? Unfortunately lost the gaelic language and we speak that variation of Portuguese that they insist in calling "language" but most of the geographical names still are sheer gaelic, including Galiza and Galego (Galeg of Gailaech).

I've found the follosing link long time that I have in personal website (which at the moment -for some reason- is not working. I'm waiting an answer from my host company):

http://members.tripod.com/~Breogan/celtic.htm

So, What is the truth? Were we come from?


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Viriato 
Posted: 05-Jun-2005, 07:27 AM
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Sorry!

By the way

How can I edit the post when I realise that is full of mistakes and has been already posted?

I can't find where...

Sorry about the mess. I hope that can be understood...
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dfilpus 
Posted: 05-Jun-2005, 07:52 AM
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QUOTE (Viriato @ 05-Jun-2005, 09:27 AM)
Sorry!

By the way

How can I edit the post when I realise that is full of mistakes and has been already posted?

I can't find where...

Sorry about the mess. I hope that can be understood...

Welcome to the forums.

The typos are okay. We all have submitted posts with major typos.

You need to be a Founder before you can edit posts after submitting. This requires a bit of money, but it does support this excellent community/

You can Preview the post before submitting it by the Preview button next to the Add Topic or Add Reply button.


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Aaediwen 
Posted: 06-Jun-2005, 04:00 PM
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Exactly where the Celts came from is not known. Unless I'm mistaken, there was a migration of culture from the area of what is now Turkey, up through Europe, and eventually as far as the isles we've come to associate with the word "Celt" As a result, at one time, most of Europe would have been Celtic lands, with what is now Ireland, Scotland, and England being some of the youngest. Then you had the Romans who came in and slapped their name on everything except for Ireland. Again, the Isles being the last, they had less time before the fall. Also, since Rome never decided to take Eire, that remained as a refuge for Celtic culture under a Celtic name until the Normans came along later.

As a result of all this, The isles may have out Celtic associations by virtue of being the last on both ends. It seems the Celts themselves can be traced backwards from the isles, south east across Europe (possibly to Messopitamia) However, for the research I've found so far, any claims further back than Germany are speculation. It was when I started seeking the question of where the Celts came from, that I found history and mythology mixing, leading back to the Thutha de Danann, and from there indicating devine creation, Atlantis, or a couple other ideas.


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Viriato 
Posted: 06-Jun-2005, 05:58 PM
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Ta dfilpus for your "filte" and the information.

I've got the message.

Hi aaediwen

Yes... Your comments seems to be in line with the link of my post, but more I read -and since I am in UK I have managed to build up a substantial library- more messy becomes, what makes it more appealing.

Perhaps one of these days we find something...
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ImmortalAvalon 
Posted: 07-Jun-2005, 11:56 PM
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From what I've read, the first culture that can verifiably be labelled "Celtic" was the Halstatt Culture which flourished around 700 BC and was succeeded by the La Tene Culture which lasted from about 500 BC until the coming of the Romans. Both of these cultures thrived in Austria, Switzerland, parts of Germany, the Czech Republic, and the Slovak Republic.

Before the Iron Age Halstatt Culture, there was a Bronze Age culture in that area called the Urnfield Culture (c. 1200 BC). There is much debate as to whether or not the Urnfield people can be termed "Celtic" or not. From archaeological evidence, it has been determined that the Halstatt Culture evolved in peaceful succession from the Urnfield, which, in turn, had evolved from the preceding culture.

So, generally, the homeland of the Celtic peoples was located, approximately, at the headwaters of the Rhine and the Danube, both of which have Celtic names. From the there, the Celts spread out across Europe in all directions, advancing, though sparsely, even into parts of Poland and the Ukraine.
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bigjimhainey 
Posted: 08-Jun-2005, 12:18 AM
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Everything that i have read about the celts also starts about the area that is now germany. Ive never seen anything that says where it came from before they moved to germany, but it hinted that they might have come from further east or southeast ,but there was no actual proof of it.


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DesertRose 
Posted: 26-Jun-2005, 03:16 AM
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Thank you everyone for your feedback! Gosh! there are so many different versions to study from.

Gabby, thanks for the link. I copied that as well. Somehow I had missed that. Thanks!
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TheCarolinaScotsman 
Posted: 26-Jun-2005, 07:00 AM
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I've read that the Beaker people (same as Urnfield, I think) were spread across Northern Europe. A new culture, the Battle Axe people, (I'm not kidding, that is their name) migrated into Europe from the Russian steppes. These two cultures merged in central Europe (the areas of Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Czech Republic, and the Slovak Republic) to form the Celtic people. The Celts then developed (as mentioned by Immortal Avalon) the Halstatt Culture and then the La Tene Culture. These cultures then spread throughout Europe in an arc from the British Isles to Galatia.

The ancient Celts were noted for their high level of learning. Most tutors employed by Greeks for the benefit of their children were Celtic. Then with the rise of the Roman Empire, the Celts were conquered. What Celtic culture did survive was at the fringes of Europe where the Romans did not conquer. It is important to remember that the Celts were never a nation or empire as such, but a large grouping or loose association of tribes and peoples who shared the same culture and language. There is some debate as to whether or not they were all the same genetic grouping. (I would say "race", but that term has become very pejorative.)

Please understand also that these two paragraphs are condensing one to two thousand years of history and development. A good site for background is http://members.aol.com/_ht_a/skyelander/menu14.html .


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Viriato 
Posted: 03-Aug-2005, 05:30 PM
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I've just found this link...

http://www.gallica.co.uk/celts/timeline.htm
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DesertRose 
Posted: 04-Aug-2005, 04:54 PM
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Pretty interesting info there to all of you. thanks so much! thumbs_up.gif
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Maddie 
Posted: 13-Aug-2005, 08:26 PM
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Celts belong to the indogermanic tribes means they came from the East. The race were called the "Keltoi" (later "Celts") and they inhabited much of central Europe. Over the centuries branches of these "Keltoi" made incursions into surrounding regions. Central Turkey was one such and they are identified as the "Galatians" in the New Testament - a modification of "Keltoi". Another group, moving westward, crossed the sea and established itself in Ireland. Their tribal name was "Goidal", from which "Gaelic" has emerged. Afterwards they crossed over to Scotland and the Hebrides. Unfortunaltely the Picts drove the Scottish group back. Later, another group, called the "Brythons" (giving "Britons") secured domination over much of the north-west (later known as "Strathclyde"), Wales and the South-West. The Romans who occupied most of this Island, naming it Britannia - the Brythons being the first Keltoi they encountered. They were, however, unable to get far into Scotland and made negligible process in Ireland. In 500 A.D. the Romans abandoned Britain, which soon after fell under the domination of Anglo-Saxon invaders from northern Europe. Around the same time the Scottish groups managed to re-conquere Scotland.
The Germanic tribes pushing before Christ from the East had named the Celts Welshe = strangers. Again later when the Anglo Saxons met Brythons and called them Welsh = aliens.

Well, in Scottish Gaelic the Lowlands are Galldachd = land of Strangers.
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Aaediwen 
Posted: 15-Aug-2005, 05:52 PM
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some interesting tidbits smile.gif
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