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Cabbagehome 
  Posted: 27-Nov-2002, 08:38 PM
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::viking Gee, we're into rice pudding now. We kids always said mom put flys in it. What a great breakfast it made. Mom would put it in oven after she made a roast, and turn the oven off at the end of supper.  It would be perfect in the morning. She used black raisins.  
Well I got yellow raisins, currants, raisins, almonds and the wiskey, (note) hi ho, hi ho, it's off to Dundee I go.
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maggiemahone1 
Posted: 27-Nov-2002, 11:19 PM
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I fix rice pudding with raisins and cinnamon.  I always think I'll have enough for a couple of days, but for some reason my hubby thinks he has to eat all of it in one day. ;) My oldest daughter likes it too.  

Cabbagehome, sounds to me like you been dipping into the cooking sherry or could it be some other kind of 'spirits.'  Just joshing ya!   :D

I forgot to look for the sultanas when I was Krogering.  It was so crowded, I just got what I needed and got out of there.   :rolleyes

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Cabbagehome 
Posted: 02-Dec-2002, 10:11 AM
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::viking COOKING SHERRY!!! Go sit on the couch for 10 mins. How many time have you been told, not to use any wine that says COOKING on the lable?  
I was not into the 'spirits'. I haven't had any of the wiskey, that is for the Dundee Cake, though Jolly Green had some with tea, lemon, and honey, claimed he had a sore through. I didn't get any of the Elderberry wine.  The gallon of Chianti is 1/2 gone, though JG complains it is awful.  Guess I'll have to put the marinate on the meats and stick them in the frezzer. I haven't even had a chance to taste it. (It is a new brand for us, but on sale, even ripple is good marinate.)
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Cabbagehome 
  Posted: 11-Dec-2002, 09:30 AM
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::viking ok I finally got to do some baking. Now I have questions.
1. Why did I need unsalted butter, when I turned around and used a big pinch of salt? (since a pinch is an 1/8 of a tsp a big is more, but less than  a1/4?)
2. Could any nut have been used?
3. What is in your mixed spices?
4. Where does the Whiskey come in? (is cake wraped in whiskey soaked cheese cloth?)
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Catriona 
Posted: 11-Dec-2002, 10:13 AM
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Quote (Cabbagehome @ Dec. 11 2002,09:30)
::viking ok I finally got to do some baking. Now I have questions.
1. Why did I need unsalted butter, when I turned around and used a big pinch of salt? (since a pinch is an 1/8 of a tsp a big is more, but less than  a1/4?)
2. Could any nut have been used?
3. What is in your mixed spices?
4. Where does the Whiskey come in? (is cake wraped in whiskey soaked cheese cloth?)

The whisky is added to the black bun along with the egg/milk mixture, I have checked and it is in the instructions - I thought I might have missed it out!

Unsalted butter is ALWAYS used in Europe when making sweet cakes.... !  The salt which is added to the flour is kind of an 'improver' I think.  MY big pinch is the amount of salt I can hold between my thumb and the first to fingers of my hand - sorry, I can't be more scientific than that!

Mixed spice is a mixture of ginger, nutmeg and cloves - but in what proportion, I have no idea.  We buy it in small canisters here.
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MDF3530 
  Posted: 11-Dec-2002, 05:50 PM
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At my house, we have our big dinner on Christmas Eve. We have prime rib and/or either lobster tail and/or shrimp. My mom also makes nut roll and eastern European pastries called colachis (ka-LACH-ees). For the colachis, she takes some bread dough and rolls it flat. Then, she cuts it up into little squares and puts either orange, strawberry, grape or prune (my favorite) filling, then folds them up and bakes them in the oven. Her colachis always are popular with everyone, so she makes about 4 or 5 batches.


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maggiemahone1 
Posted: 11-Dec-2002, 06:32 PM
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MDF3530, maybe I'll come to your house for dinner on Christmas Eve, your menu sounds wonderful, I love shrimp and the colachis sounds really yummy.   :D  I'm just funnin ya!  I plan on serving shrimp for our family get together on Christmas Eve.  I really haven't gotten my menu planned out yet, but I am slowly getting it together.  Have fun!

BTW: you can spell really well, my hubby is always asking me how to spell something and then when I tell him, he says,"that doesn't sound right."  To prove myself correct, I have to get the electronic dictionary out and show him.  :rolleyes

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MDF3530 
  Posted: 12-Dec-2002, 06:22 PM
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Quote (maggiemahone1 @ Dec. 11 2002,5:32)
BTW: you can spell really well, my hubby is always asking me how to spell something and then when I tell him, he says,"that doesn't sound right."  To prove myself correct, I have to get the electronic dictionary out and show him.  :rolleyes

I guessed on how to spell colachi <:D.
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MDF3530 
Posted: 23-Dec-2002, 05:48 PM
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BTW, my mom made her colachis today. Prune (yummy) and apricot (yucky).
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Catriona 
Posted: 09-Oct-2003, 06:02 AM
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I had just started a new thread for Christmas/hogmanay recipes, then I found this old one I started last year - it seemed silly to have two, so I've 'bumped' this up to the top again!

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Catriona 
Posted: 09-Oct-2003, 06:03 AM
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MULLED WINE FROM DELIA SMITH'S CHRISTMAS BOOK

The following recipe has been donated by the wine writer Alice King. Alice says that the great thing about mulled wine is that you can keep adding to it. If unexpected guests arrive and you've no wine left, simply add some more water and fruit. Use the recipe below as a basic guideline, adjusting the quantities of wine if you want it stronger and adding more sugar or honey if you like it sweeter.

Serves 12

2 x 75 cl bottles medium to full-bodied red wine (Bulgarian Cabernet Sauvignon is ideal)

1 orange stuck with cloves

2 oranges, sliced

2 lemons, sliced

6 level tablespoons granulated sugar or honey

2 inch (5 cm) piece cinnamon stick

2 level teaspoons finely grated fresh root ginger or ground ginger

2 tablespoons fruit liqueur such as Cointreau, Grand Marnier or cherry brandy (optional)


Put all the ingredients in a saucepan with 21/2 pints (1.5 litres) water then heat to simmering point, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Keep it barely at simmering point for at least 20 minutes ? but do not boil or all the alcohol will evaporate.

This can be made in advance, then re-heated just before the party. Serve it warm in half-pint mugs (in which case there will be 12 servings) or else in 24 sturdy wine glasses

This post has been edited by Catriona on 28-Jul-2004, 05:48 PM
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Catriona 
Posted: 09-Nov-2003, 07:08 PM
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I'm 'bumping' this to the top again, as Barddas has started a thread about Hogmanay, and some might find the posts here of interest!
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Shadows 
Posted: 10-Nov-2003, 09:02 AM
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This is a traditional Hogmanay drink.

Recipe Name: HET PINT (SPIRITS)
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 6

SOURCE ORIGINAL SCOTTISH RECIPES
4 Pint mild ale
1 Tsp. grated nutmeg
1/2 Cup (4 oz) sugar
3 eggs
1 Cup (1/2 pint) Scotch whisky

The het (hot) pint was a traditional form of punch, bought at the public house and carried home through the streets at Hogmanay (New Year's Eve) in large copper toddy kettles several hours before midnight to help family and friends "bring in the New Year".


Put ale into a thick saucepan
Add nutmeg, bring to just below boiling-point. Do not boil! *
Stir in sugar, let it dissolve.
Beat eggs very well, add gradually to beer, stir all the time to avoid curdling.
Add whisky, heat up. Do not boil! *
Pour liquid from saucepan into heated tankards, back and forth.
Serve when pouring drink back and forth enough makes it clear and sparkling.
Het pint can also be made with white wine and brandy instead of ale and whisky.


* If you boil liquor, the alcohol vaporizes into thin air...





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Catriona 
Posted: 10-Nov-2003, 09:49 AM
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It's funny, Shadows. I know of this recipe - but I can honestly say that I have never tasted it - nor seen it made or even seen it served in any pub/restaurant at Hogmanay. Obviously it's fallen totally out of fashion!

It would appear that the slightly more effete 'mulled wine' has taken over as a way of serving a large number ofpeople with a drink!
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Shadows 
Posted: 10-Nov-2003, 01:09 PM
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It is funny that it was the poorman's family drink many centuries ago, might acount for it's lack of favor in the modern society, there are those who so much want to forget the past if it concerned the common person. This drink has gone the way of a lot of old tradition associated with the poor.

It still is a wonderfull elixir for the season, try it you will like it!!!!

I served it this weekend at an 18th century encampment and it got wonderful reviews!

Don't let the eggs scare ya... they are what make it clear and sparkle!

I too like my mulled wine, but often look for those things out of the ordinary, they keep life from becoming boring!
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