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> Fall Recipes, Fall is here, share the recipes!
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dragonboy3611 
Posted: 08-Nov-2004, 03:52 PM
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ZodiacBirch

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All these recipies sound great! I am gonna try a bunch of them!!!


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freekenny 
Posted: 10-Nov-2004, 02:09 PM
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QUOTE (Sekhmet @ 04-Nov-2004, 02:10 AM)
Kuwe, Freekenny...

Don't suppose you have a good recipe for frybread offhand? I'm gonna go nuts if I don't get some made pretty soon...

Niyawe (I'll see your Cherokee and raise you some Mingo. tongue.gif )

O'siyo Sekhmet,
~ This recipe is relatively simple and really delicious! wink.gif chef.gif

2 cups flour
2 tablespoons baking powder
2 tablespoons sugar (or less, if you prefer your bannock less sweet)
2 pinches salt
water, at room temperature
1. Mix flour, baking powder, sugar and salt together.
2. Mix with enough water so that the mixture becomes a dough.
3. Form into 4-6 large, thick patties.
4. Fry on lightly oiled frying pan, turning when the bottom is golden.
5. (You may also bake in the oven.) Good served warm.
6. If desired, spread with honey, jam, butter, or peanut butter.
7. Traditionally bannock would have been made with whatever ingredients were on hand.
8. For example, adding blueberries if they're in season

~Sty-U red_bandana.gif
P.S. Okay, I'll raise you Cherokee/Navajo and see your Mingo wine.gif


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Sekhmet 
Posted: 10-Nov-2004, 11:23 PM
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ZodiacAlder

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Yay! I've got frybread recipes to try out now. I haven't made it in years, and the one that I *did* have disappeared when we moved to this house. It very well could be that it never got unpacked. My husband's family makes something called "doughballs" that are similar, but not quite the same thing. For them it's an Amish dish (yes, my father in law's mother's side of the family were all Amish) that they do in the winter.

...hm...now to dig out the meat pie/bridie recipe for you guys...



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maryellen 
Posted: 13-Nov-2004, 08:59 PM
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Nothing like fresh baked bread from the oven. I love this when I want something warm and quick.

White Bread

3c. flour
1/4 c. sugar
1T yeast
1/4c. warm water
1c. hot water
1 1/2T butter
1 1/2t. salt

1. Mix 1/4c. water and yeast. Add sugar.
2. Mix butter and hot water until butter is melted.
3. Add flour and salt. Add butter mix. Knead. Let rise for 1 hour. Punch. Let rise 15-30 minutes. Bake 350 degrees for 30 minutes.
Yummy with butter and honey.


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capttrk1 
  Posted: 15-Nov-2004, 12:20 PM
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Tried the stuffed pumpkin last Sunday and it was GREAT . I will again make it to include on thanksgiving day as a side dish .This time i wil try adding some apple chunks to the dish . Thank you it made Sunday dinner something to tell friends about. God Bless
Capttrk1


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Herrerano 
Posted: 15-Nov-2004, 03:21 PM
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ZodiacIvy

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Talking about fry bread, here is the Panamanian version called Hojaldres. They are eaten normally for breakfast here. You can even buy them prepared in the store to take home and fry.

Translation follows:

HOJALDRES

INGREDIENTES:
2 3/4 tz. harina
1/4 tz. aceite
2/3 tz. leche o agua
1 1/2 ct. polvos de hornear
2 ct. sal
1 ct. azucar
3 tz. aceite
PROCEDIMENTOS
Una el aceite con la leche, sal y azucar. Agregue el polvo de hornear a la harina y luego les va agregando el liquido, poco a poco, uniendo con ayuda de tenedor. Deje reposar por una o dos horas. Estire porciones individuales y fria en aceite bien caliente. Reciba sobre plato que tenga papel absorbente. Puede rociar azucar granulada o en polvo por encima



HOJALDRES
INGREDIENTES:
2 3/4 cup wheat flour
1/4 cup. oil
2/3 cup milk or water
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp salt (I would cut this a little depending on your taste)
1 tsp sugar
3 cup oil (for frying)
PROCEDURE:
Mix oil with milk salt and sugar. Add the baking powder to the flour and then little by little add the liquid mixing with a fork. Let rest one to two hours. Form patties about one quarter inch thick, about four inches in diameter. Fry in hot oil until slightly browned. Collect over paper towels. Serve with powdered sugar or honey.






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Shadows 
Posted: 16-Nov-2004, 12:41 PM
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Smoked Beef Brisket with Sauerkraut and Dumplings
from Shadows


This recipe is a combination of cool smoking and good old Pennsylvania Dutch cooking! The smoke flavoring blends well with the kraut and the dumplings. It is one of my family's favorite fall meals.

INGREDIENTS:

2 tablespoons Carolina BBQ Rub
2 tablespoons butter or other fat
1 large onion, sliced
3 pound brisket of beef
salt and pepper to taste
1 1/2 quarts sauerkraut
For Dumplings:
2 cups flour
1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter milk

PREPARATION:

Rub the brisket with the Carolina BBQ Rub and let sit for 1 hour. Prepare smoker for a 2 hour smoke with cherry and maple woods. Smoke Brisket for 2 hours.
Melt butter in a large pan and brown onion slices.
Add brisket and sauerkraut. Cover with boiling water and put in the oven at a low temperature for 2 hours or until the meat is tender.

To prepare dumplings, sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Using a pastry blender or two knives cut in the butter. Quickly stir in enough milk to make a soft dough. On a floured surface, roll dough 1/2 inch thick. Cut into 12 squares. Put the squares on top of the simmering beef and kraut.

Cover tightly and simmer 20 minutes without removing the cover. Serve immediately.


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Shadows 
Posted: 16-Nov-2004, 12:50 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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Carolina BBQ Rub for above recipe:

2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons chili powder
2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper or more to taste.
1/4 cup paprika

PREPARATION:

Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and mix well; rub on meat of choice and let sit for atleast 1 hour before smoking or cooking.
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Sekhmet 
Posted: 17-Nov-2004, 12:56 AM
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You people are evil. Eeeeeeeevil, I tell you. I'm gaining weight reading these things, nevermind cooking like a madwoman now.
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Shadows 
Posted: 17-Nov-2004, 09:52 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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If one can't enjoy the culinary pleasures of life what is left???

Oh! I guess that is just for us older folks LOL!!!!
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Shadows 
Posted: 19-Nov-2004, 10:36 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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This one is from Weber also:

Smoked Barbecued Turkey



Indirect/Medium


1 turkey, 11 to 13 pounds, fresh or defrosted
Extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
3 cups chicken stock
1 stick unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces
1 tablespoon dried marjoram
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon granulated garlic


3 handfuls hickory chips, soaked in water for at least 30 minutes



Remove the neck and giblets from the turkey cavity and reserve for another use. If your turkey has a metal or plastic trussing clamp, leave it in place. Lightly brush or spray the turkey all over with oil. Season the inside and outside generously with salt and pepper.

In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, cook the chicken stock, butter, marjoram, thyme, garlic, and 1/2 teaspoon of pepper until the butter has melted. Pour 1 cup of the chicken stock mixture into a small bowl. Draw the mixture in the bowl into a kitchen syringe. Inject the syringe into the drumsticks, thighs, and breast of the turkey, refilling the syringe each time. Pour the remaining 2 cups of the chicken stock mixture inside a heavy-duty roasting pan. Place the turkey, breast side up, on a roasting rack, and set inside the pan.

Follow the grill's instructions for using wood chips. Grill the turkey over Indirect Medium heat, using wood chips for the first 30 minutes. Check the turkey after the first hour. If any parts are getting too dark, wrap them tightly with aluminum foil. Check again after another hour and cover any dark areas with foil. The turkey is done when the internal temperature reaches 160°F in the breast and 170°F in the thickest part of the thigh, about 2-1/4 to 3 hours. Transfer the turkey to a cutting board and let rest for 20 to 30 minutes before carving (the internal temperatures will rise 5°F to 10°F during resting).

Makes 11 to 13 servings

This recipe requires a kitchen syringe.
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Shadows 
Posted: 19-Nov-2004, 10:42 PM
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This recipe is of Scottish origin:


FINE FLAVOUR TURKEY

Turkey presents three problems; the length of time needed to cook it; getting it to taste of anything; and preventing the white meat from drying out while cooking the dark meat thoroughly. This method solves all those problems but creates a new one; it involves cutting the turkey into four large pieces, which means you cannot present the bird in its traditional form at the table. However, it is easier to cut up and the major difference is that the results are extremely juicy and flavourful. Many families to whom this method has been shown now use it and children definitely prefer it. You should try it at least once.

Cut turkey into four large pieces, or have it cut at the market. The best cuts are:
(1.) Along the breastbone to separate in halves, then
(2.) Diagonally down and forward on each half, following the line of the breast meat to separate the breast from the leg part.
Follow your traditional turkey recipe, omitting salt, using the new times below and adjusting cooking times for accessory dishes, such as stuffing, vegetables, etc.
1 dressed turkey, 15 - 20 lb.
6 - 8 tbs. of salt, heaped



Two days before serving day, rub salt all over the pieces.
Let stand in a pan or tray in cool place, but not refrigerated for 30 hours.
On the serving day, wash turkey lightly with clear water.
Place turkey in deep pot with cold water to cover.
Boil tender turkey for 20 minutes; older turkey for 30 minutes.
Preheat oven to 325°F (165°C) Place turkey pieces in oven.
If using stuffing, add at same time. If not, consider Bread Sauce.
Roast at least 7 minutes per lb if turkey weighs less than 16 lb.
Roast at least 6 minutes per lb if turkey weighs more than 16 lb.
If cooking with a meat thermometer, turkey is ready when:
Breast registers 170°F (77°C).
Thigh registers 185°F (85°C).
Test by piercing with fork to see if juices run clear.
When done, remove from oven; cover loosely with towel or foil.
Let rest 15 minutes before carving.
If you wish to eat the turkey unroasted, it is equally good hot or cold and much juicier and more savoury than regular left-over turkey. Prepare it as follows:
Two days before serving day, rub salt all over the pieces.
Let stand in a pan or tray in cool place, but not refrigerated for 30 hours.
On the serving day, wash turkey lightly with clear water.
Place turkey in deep pot with cold water to cover.
Boil tender turkey for 40 minutes; older turkey for 60 minutes.
Serve sliced, hot or cold. Keep the boiling liquid for soup.
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freekenny 
Posted: 29-Nov-2004, 04:14 PM
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QUOTE (Sekhmet @ 17-Nov-2004, 12:56 AM)
You people are evil. Eeeeeeeevil, I tell you. I'm gaining weight reading these things, nevermind cooking like a madwoman now.

O'siyo Sekhmet,
~ You did remember to ask Santa for a treadmill and some workout equiptment right?? sport.gif lol.gif
~Sty-U and happy eatin'! red_bandana.gif
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ghost 
Posted: 08-Sep-2005, 04:46 PM
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Venison with Leeks

Serves 4

1 1/2 pounds loin of venison, trimmed and cut into 1 1/2 inch wide strips
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
1/2 cup dry sherry
1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
3 garlic cloves, minced
4 large leeks(about 2 pounds), coarsely chopped
3/4 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro

1. Marinate the venison in the ginger, soy sauce, vinegar, sherry, and oil for 1 hour. Drain. Reserve the marinade.

2. In a large nonstick saute pan, saute the venison over medium-high heat until lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Do this in batches if necessary in order not to overcrowd the pan. Transfer the meat to a bowl. Add the garlic and leeks to the pan. Saute, stirring, for 3 minutes, until the leek is softened. Add the reserved marinade, the chicken broth, and the tomato paste. Return the venison to the pan and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes, until the liquid has reduced a bit and thickened. Add the cilantro and serve on a bed of mixed wild/regular rice.

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Shadows 
Posted: 09-Oct-2005, 06:35 AM
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ZodiacHolly

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This recipe is supposed to be of Mayan origin, but with the modern directions I will place it here instead of in the Native thread:

Pumpkin Soup
In early pumpkin soup recipes, the pumpkin would have been baked whole in hot ashes. Peeled and chopped pumpkin would then have been thinned with broth from wildfowl or game.

1 small pumpkin, about 12"
2 tbs palm oil
3 tbs honey
1/2 tsp ground allspice
4 c turkey broth
Salt to taste
Thinly sliced wild onions
Roasted pumpkin seeds, for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place pumpkin in a baking dish and roast until easily pierced with a knife, about 1 hour. Allow pumpkin to cool, slice off top and scoop out seeds. Clean pumpkin fibers from seeds and discard. Toss seeds with oil and salt to taste. Spread out on a baking sheet and return to oven 15-20 minutes, until crisp and golden. Reserve for garnish.
Scrape the pumpkin flesh from shell and mash, or puree if a smoother mixture is desired. Place the pumpkin in a large saucepan and season with salt, honey and allspice. Gradually stir in enough broth to make soup with thin or thick consistency, as desired. Simmer over medium heat about 5 minutes, until hot. If desired, serve soup in small pumpkin or squash shells. Garnish with onions and pumpkin seeds.
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