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DesertRose 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 10:42 PM
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Tell us about your clan affiliation and what you have learned about them. If you are looking for what clan you might be affiliated with, this a good website to start out with.

http://www.tartans.com/



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DesertRose 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 11:03 PM
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Through my research, I have discovered that my Scottish ancestry come from the Macpherson clan. The most hilarious thing is so is my husband's family! hug.gif

Any of you from the MacPherson Clan?

Here is a couple of sites that you might be interested in as well as a little history of our clan.

http://www.his.com/~rory/colliergen.html

http://www.clan-macpherson.org/

Glimpses Appendix 9
GENEALOGY OF THE MACPHERSONS.


From Jeremy Collier's'Great Historical, Geographical, Genealogical, and Poetical Dictionary, London, 1701. Reprinted on pp 436-438 of Alexander Macpherson's Glimpses
What follows is taken from the Appendix of Glimpses. In that form it consists of one long paragraph; which I have broken it up into a series of smaller ones. The information it contains is to a large degree fantasy / myth as will be shown by Prof. Alan G. Macpherson¼s appraisal that follows will point out. Nevertheless it was highly esteemed by the Macphersons of its day as well as in recent times and does contains some insights that are valuable to students who seek to better understand the history of the Clam Macpherson. A similar article by Peter Fish appeared in The Urlar #39, Spring 1986 under the title 'THE ORIGIN OF THE CLAN -- Sir Aeneas Macpherson of Invereshie's Version. It is from this article that AGM's critique is derived -- Rory Mor

MCPHERSON.-The name of a Scotch Highland Clan commonly called the Clan Chattan, fam'd for antiquity and valour. They draw their original from the Chatti, or Catti, the antient inhabitants of Hessia and Thuringia, in Germany, whence they were expelled by the Hermondures, with the assistance of the Romans, in the reign of the Emperor Tiberius. Cattorum Castellum, one of the Landtgrave of Hesse's Palaces, and Cattorurn Melibceci or Catzenellebogen, which is one of the family's Titles, do still preserve the memory of the antient Catti, who being forced to leave their Country, came lower down upon the Rhine into Battavia, now Holland, where Catwick, &c., still bears their name; thence a colony of them came for Scotland, and landing in the North of that Kingdom were kindly received by the King of Scots, who gave them that part of the Country, where they landed, which from them was called Caithnesse - ie., the Catti's Corner.

Being settled here, they did many eminent services against the Picts, and other enemies of the Scots, till the time of king Alphinus, when the Chief of the Catti, called Gilly Catton Moir - ie., the great for his extraordinary conduct and valour, being married to a sister of Brudus, King of the Picts, he was in a streight how to behave himself betwixt both Kings, who in a little time after fell out, and as the best expedient resolves upon a Neutrality. In the reign of Kennethus II, who also had war with the Picts, this Gilly Catton Moir, amongst others of the Scotch nobility, was summoned to attend the King's Standard: he excused himself by reason of his age; but to evidence his loyalty, though allied to the Picts, he sent one of his sons, with half of his clan, to join the Scots, which did not a little contribute to that fatal blow that issued in the utter ruin of the Picts.

Most of the Clan Chattan, with their valiant leader, falling in the battle, the old man died for grief, and the remaining part were, by the advice of their enemies, prosecuted as favourers of the Picts, expelled Caithness, and, with much ado, obtained leave to settle in Lochaber, where they remain to this day; and the son of the Captain of the clan, who fell in the battle against the Picts, was in consideration of his father's merit created Knight Marshal, from whom the illustrious family of Keith, now great Earl Marshal of Scotland, are said to be descended.

The chief of those who settled in Lochaber was, in a little time after, made Hereditary steward of that Country, and the family, for some ages, had a standing Commission from the crown to suppress rebellions, by virtue of which, they ruined the family of the Cummins, one of the greatest in the Kingdom, but engaged in an incurable rebellion in the time of Bruce.

Muirach MIGilly Chattan, called Albanach abroad, where he travelled, because of his Country, was second son to Dermond M'Gillychattan, Chief of the Clan, and for his extraordinary piety had a church preferment, and was made Prior of Kinguishy. Celibacy having not then obtained amongst the Scotch Clergy, he married the Thane of Calder's daughter, by whom he had Dugal Ovir, or the swarthy, his eldest son, afterwards Captain of the clan ; Evan Bane, or the fair, from whom comes Clunie M'Pherson; Niel Cromb, or the stooping Smith, so called from his round shoulders and the curious works which he made in Iron and Brass, from whom comes the family of Breakoe-Smith and others. Farchard Gillybrae, so called from his swiftness and expedition, of whom are the family of M'Gillybrayes of Dunmaglash on the river of Nairn, and David Dow, or the black, from whom are descended the Davidsons of Invernahavine. These, and some others, were all Muirach's sons, and besides their petty nicknames from complexions or temper, and the Patronymicks derived by their posterity, from their several sects, they were always called Clan Wirich in memory of their father, and clan Pherson or M'Pherson from his Office.

This Muirach's eldest brother dying, he succeeded as chief of the clan, and having settled his affairs, left his eldest son, Dugal Ovir above-named, in possession of the Estate, and went in Pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and arriving there on the third of May, he kept that day ever after, and bound his family in a curse to do the like, which they observe to this day. In his return he took Rome, Spain, and Ireland in his way, and happening to come thither, when there was a contest for the crown of Leinster, and being in great reputation for his quality and piety, he was applied to, for reconciling the differing factions, in which he behaved himself with such extraordinary Conduct, that though neither of them would yield to one another, they unanimously chose him a little after, being, by this time a widower and well stricken in years, he married the daughter of O'Neal, one of the Competitors, and gained so much love from the people, that they made the Succession Hereditary to his family. He died in the 23rd of his reign, and was buried in the Cathedral of Dublin. His son Evar M'Muirach succeeded, governed well, and died in the 49th of his reign. His son Dermond M'Wirich succeeded, who for his Tyranny, and particularly ravishing the wife of Maurice O'rock,1 King of Meath, was expelled his Kingdom, and restored again by HenryII., king of England, who laid claim to the crown of Ireland afterward; so that Muirach's progeny were outed of the soveraignty, but the family of the McMuirachs, still remaining in Ireland, derive their pedigree from him.

Dugal Ovir above-mentioned, who was left Chief of the Clan in Scotland, had only one son, and he an only daughter, who marrying a stranger called M'Kintosh --ie., the Thane's son, being son or grandson to the Thane of Fife,-- the estate was transferred into another family, whence the Laird of M'Kintosh is lineally descended, and that family pretended to be chief of the clan Chattan as marrying the Heiress; but the M'Donalds, who were superiour to all the Clans, determined it often in favour of the Laird of Cluny's predecessors, and it was finally determined on his side, by the Council of Scotland, in the reign of Charles II., who declared the M'Kintoshes and M'Phersons different families, because M'Kintosh did not take the name and bearing of the Heiress's family.

Evan Bane, before-mentioned, had for his Lady a daughter of M'Leans, by whom he had Kenneth, the eldest Cluny's predecessor - and Gilly's, II., of whom the family of Inveressie, and one John, by another woman, of whom the family of Pitmean. This family has had many fewds with neighbouring clans, but more especially with the Clan Cameron's, having in one battle killed their chief, the Laird of Lochzell, with about 600 of his clan, and taking the rest, brought them to Cluny's house, where some were for cutting them off, but he generously set them at liberty, saying that his family would grow effeminate if they wanted an enemy to exercise their valour.

It was also the M'Phersons who fought that bloody combat of thirty on a side in the Inch of Perth, in presence of the King, and came off with the Victory; and it was that clan who held out the Castle of Ruthven for the Earl of Huntly against the Earl of Argile in Queen Mary's time. This family appeared in the field for King Charles I., with 600 Men, under the Marquis of Montrose, and Win. M'Pherson, Laird of Inveressie, was killed under their command at the Battle of Old Earn [Auldearn]. They also declared for King James, under the Viscount of Dundee, and six-and-twenty of them were killed at Crombdale by Sir Thomas Levingston, Commander of King William and Queen Mary's Forces -- but since that time they have submitted to the Government, and their chief hath been ordered to raise men for its service.

This clan can bring a regiment of well-armed men to the Field. In time of peace they are said to be as courteous and industrious as the lowlanders, and in time of war, can endure the fatigue of the rudest Highlanders.

Their ancient bearing was a ship, in memory of their voyage by sea; and the cross Croslet, in memory of the above-mentioned pilgrimage, and the bloody hand, in remembrance of Exterminating the Cummins. Their Chief's coat is now party par pale or and azure, in the Dexter Canton, a hand holding a dagger Saltirewise, and in the sinister a cross croslet, fitche Gules, and the supporters are two Highlanders with their slit doublets, naked from the Girdle downwards, with their shirts tied betwixt their thighs, their swords, Durks and Helmets proper, and for his crest a cat Rampant proper, with this motto, "Touch not the Cat but a Glove."

Collier adds: " This narrative was collected by a person of quality of the family, and one of its principal branches."
_________
1 [O'Rourke?]


Prof. Alan G. Macpherson's Commentary of Collier's publication.

"The document is a well-known one. It was first published in 1701 as an article under the title of 'McPherson' in Jeremy Collier's Great Historical, Geographical, Genealogical, and Political Dictionary. This was an early attempt at a one-volume encyclopedia rather than what we now understand as a dictionary. It was republished in 1893 by Alexander Macpherson, Provost of Kingussie and Factor of the Cluny estate, in his book Glimpses of Church and Social Life in the Highlands in Olden Times and Other Papers.

"What is interesting about your copy in manuscript is that Badenoch Macphersons emigrating to the New World in the 1770s knew of this paper and copied it. I suspect that the copy was made from the printed Version of 1701 rather than from the original manuscript. Your copy, apart from minor differences in the spelling of names, is identical with the 1701 version. But yours omits the technical and official description of the chief's coat of arms just before the reference to the motto (last sentence). The 1701 version includes an editorial note by Collier: 'This narrative was collected by a person of quality of the family and one of its principal branches.'

"It has always been assumed that this person of quality was Sir Aeneas Macpherson of Invereshie, author of The Loyall Dissuasive. There is a section devoted to him in my Posterity of the Three Brethren. On the other hand, the 1701 version does not include the note about the authors at the end of your copy, and this is very interesting to me because these are precisely the authorities used by Sir Aeneas in The Loyall Dissuasive. 2 It makes it pretty certain that he was the author of the article.¾


SUMMARY OF AGM'S COMMENTS ON THE LOYALLL DISSUASIVE

From The Posterity of the Three Brethren
"Highland historians have generally discounted the connections with the Chatti, with Caithness, and with the King of Leinster. Vatican records fail to reveal the papal dispensation, while the pilgrimage to Jerusalem is based upon a mistaken identification of Muriach Cattanach with Muireach Albanach, the famous O'Daly poet and progenitor of the bardic Mac Vurichs of Clan Ranald ... Sir Aeneas Macpherson's version, in fact owes practically nothing to the tradition of his own clan except for some of the personal names, and should probably be held suspect as a version heavily contaminated with material drawn from Latin, Irish and French literary sources."
___________
2 "The Authors from which this is collected are Tacitus, Liber, Paslitenssis, Irish Annals, Buchanan, Spotswood, Sir George McKenzie's heraldry."



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Keltic 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 11:26 PM
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MacPherson clan here as well. The 'a' was dropped from the name sometime between our families move from MacPherson's Mills in Pictou County, Nova Scotia to the Niagara Peninsula in Ontario.


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DesertRose 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 11:42 PM
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Well welcome cousin! wink.gif thumbs_up.gif

Here is some interesting news about our clan that happened recently.

The Clan was saddened by the death of Lady Macpherson of Cluny on the 30th October, 2003 after a courageous fight against Cancer. She was 72.
She had just recently returned from the USA with her husband Sir William of Cluny after attending one of the local Clan Gatherings.

Lady Macpherson of Cluny was born Sheila Mcdonald Brodie in Bombay, India where her father worked in banking. She attended Wellington School for Girls in Ayr and after achieving secretarial qualifications she worked in London and Edinburgh as a personal assistant. One such post as PA to the head of the National Association for the Paralysed a position of which she was rightfully proud.

It was whilst in London that she met Sir William and they were married on December 27, 1962 in Edinburgh by Canon Martineau of St. Columba?s by-the-Castle. They lived in London where Sir William pursued his career in Law but Newton Castle in Blairgowrie was always seen as their family home.

She was an accomplished cook and hostess, to which her hospitality at Newton Castle bore testament. Her skills also ranged from needlework, gardening, tapestry as well as being an avid reader, to golf. She was a member of the Blairgowrie Golf Club.

Lady Macpherson will be missed greatly by Clan members not least at the many Clan Gatherings both at home and abroad. In the words of a friend, ?She was a lady of immense energy, charm and elegance.? She was always proud to wear the clan tartan and took her duty as the Clan Chief?s wife very seriously.

She is survived by Sir William, Annie, Alan, Jamie and two grandchildren Eliza and Torquil. She also leaves her sister Margaret Leith who lives in Aberdeen. Her twin sister, who lived in Buckinghamshire, died a number of years ago.

A private cremation was held at Perth. A thanksgiving service was held in Blairgowrie Parish Church on Wednesday November 12, 2003 which was well attended and the congregation were invited back to Newton Castle to hospitality that rightfully did Lady Macpherson proud.

http://www.clan-macpherson.org/lady_macphe...n_of_cluny.html

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MDF3530 
  Posted: 15-Dec-2003, 12:21 AM
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Here's Clan #1 of 2 for me:
The Clan Maxwell


* Arms: Argent, a saltire Sable, (as displayed on the arms of the Earl of Nithsdale) viz:- Argent, an eagle displayed Sable, beaked and membered Gules, (Nithsdale), surmounted of an escutcheon of the first, charged with saltire of the Sceond (Maxwell), the escutcheon surcharged in the center with an urcheon, Or (Herries).
* Badge: A stag Proper, attired Argent, couchant before a holly bush Proper.
* Motto: Reviresco (I flourish again)
* Tartans: Maxwell
* Septs: Adair, Blackstock, Dinwiddie, Dinwoodie, Edgar, Herries, Kirk, Kirkland, Latimer, Latimore, Mackittrick, Maxton, Mescall, Monreith, Moss, Nithdale, Paulk, Peacock, Pollock, Pollok, Polk, Sturgeon, Wardlaw

Maccus Well, a pool in the River Tweed by Kelso, is claimed as the origin for this name. Maccus was believed to be a Norse chief who lived in the reign of David I. Sir John Maxwell, Chamberlain of Scotland, died without issue and was succeeded by his brother, Aymer, from whose sons sprang many branches of this family throughout the southwest of Scotland.

Sir Herbert Maxwell swore fealty to Edward I of England in the ragman Roll of 1296. His son, Eustace, held Caerlaverock Castle as a vassal of the English, but later followed Robert the Bruce to Bannockburn in 1314. His descendent, another Sir Herbert, was created Lord Maxwell around 1440, taking his seat as Lord of Parliament. From his second son descended the Maxwells of Monrieth, who were later to be created baronets in 1681. The fifth Lord intrigued with Henry VII of England, although by 1542 James V had appointed him warden of the marches. Maxwell was captured at the Battle of Solway Moss in the same year.

John, the seventh Lord, remained a devout Catholic throughout the Reformation, and his name was linked with a number of plots to restore Mary, Queen of Scots to her throne. After Mary's execution in England in 1687 and the defeat of the Spanish Armada the following year, Lord Maxwell continued to correspond with Philip of Spain, seeking support for a Catholic revolution. Maxwell was killed in 1593 during a feud between his family and the Johnstons, near Lockerbie. The feud continued, however, and the next Lord Maxwell shot Sir James Johnston, who was attempting to reconcile the two warring factions.

His brother, Robert, succeeded to the Maxwell title and additionally was created Earl of Nithsdale. His descendent, the fifth Earl of Nithsdale, was a staunch Jacobite who was captured at the Battle of Preston during the ill-fated rising of 1715. He was taken to London, tried and sentenced to death for treason. On the eve of his execution, with the assistance of his wife, he escaped from the Tower of London, disguised as a serving woman. The couple fled to Rome where the Earl died in 1744.

A number of the cadet branches rose to prominence in their own right, including the Maxwells of Cardoness, Monreith, Sprinkel and Pollok, each achieving the rank of baronet. Pollok House, the seat of the Maxwell Baronets of Pollok, was gifted to the city of Glasgow in 1967; in its grounds is the world-famous Burrell Collection of art.

James Clerk Maxwell, born in Edinburgh in 1831, was a physicist who made a fundamental contribution to this branch of science through his formulation of electromagnetic theory. Gavin Maxwell, the Scottish author and naturalist who died in 1969, was the youngest son of Sir Herbert Maxwell who descended from the Maxwells of Monreith.


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May the Irish hills caress you.
May her lakes and rivers bless you.
May the luck of the Irish enfold you.
May the blessings of Saint Patrick behold you.


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MDF3530 
  Posted: 15-Dec-2003, 12:37 AM
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And here's Clan #2 of 2:

ORIGINS OF THE MC LOUGHLIN FAMILY (Ireland)

There are two distinct branches of the Mc Loughlin family, the Northern branch descended from the Northern Ui Neill who were known as Mac Lochlainn and the Southern branch descended from the Southern Ui Neill who were known as Ua Maelsechnaill.

The first O Maelsechnaills were the sons of Flann Sionna (Flann of the Shannon) who reigned from 876 to 914 AD. His father was Maeleachlainn (Malachy), High King of Ireland from 844 to 860 AD Their territory was based in the modern counties of Meath and Westmeath stretching from the river Shannon to the East coast of Ireland.

The O Maoilseachlainn ruled Meath throughout the tenth and eleventh centuries but after the Anglo-Norman invasion of 1169, Hugh De Lacy took control over much of the modern county Meath pushing the O Maoilseachlainn back to their main power base around Moate.

The O Maoilseachlainn were still a powerful force throughout the following centuries exerting influence in the counties now known as Offaly and Westmeath. As late as the sixteenth century, they were still extracting rights from the MacGeoghegan family.

In the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century, many Irish names became more anglicized often dropping the O or Mac prefixes. Thus O Melaghlin became Melaghlin and eventually came to be spelled as McLoughlin. A Thomas Melaghlin served under the Spanish King in Flanders in the Seventeenth century.

Mc Loughlin Kings of Meath
Niall of the Nine Hostages' +405
Conal Cremthainn
Fearghus Cearbhaill
Diarmond
Colman Mor
Suibhne
Airmedeach Caech
Diermod Dian
Murchadh Midheach
Domhnall  High King +763
Donnchadh  High King  +797
Maolruanaidh  +843
Maoilseachlainn  (Malachy I)  High King   +862
Flann Sinna  'of the Shannon'  High King   +914
Donnchadh   High King
Domhnall   +952
Maoilseachlainn  (Malachy II)  Mor   High King   +1022
Domhnall
Conchobar   +1073
Domhnall    +1094 
Murchadh
Maoilseachlainn   +1155
Art   +1184
Cormac   +1239
Art na Caislen   +1283
Niall
Cormac ballach  +1362
Cormac
Conn   +1431
Art    +1468
Conn Mor O'Melaghlin
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High Plains Drifter 
Posted: 16-Dec-2003, 10:32 PM
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My Scottish roots are Clan Campbell of Cawdor and my family lived near Cawdor Castle and Nairn in the 17th Century and before. I hope to go visit the area in a few years, not so much for genealogy purposes but to visit the distilleries nearby. tongue.gif


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Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 
Posted: 17-Dec-2003, 11:01 AM
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I am a member of Clan Donald USA, as shown in my signature and avatar. Other clans and families in various lineages include: Abbott, Campbell, Dunbar, Fergusson, Frazier, Hogg, Livingston (Lowland family), and McCulloch. While Clan Donald is my senior paternal clan, I have the most complete information on the lineage to my Livingston and McCulloch maternal clans. Clan Donald is the largest of the clans, and for many centuries operated as virtually an independant kingdom. It has been said that:
QUOTE
The history of Clan Donald, more than that of any other clan, embodies the history of the Western Highlands 1200 - 1500: a threefold struggle between the Celts and Anglo-Saxons; between the Gaelic clan system and Teutonic feudalism, and between the semi-autonomous kingdom of the "Lords of the Isle" and the slow but inexorable growth in the might of the young but expansive Scottish state.

Even the celebrated (and somewhat overblown) rivalry between Clan Donald and Clan Campbell can be summarized within the context of these three struggles: Clan Donald desired to preserve the Gaelic system and the clan's independent kingdom; Clan Campbell, seeing the eventual domination of the Highlands by the Scottish state, sided with the state and took advantage of that allegiance to fill the power vacumn created by the destruction of the Lordship of the Isles. All the clans, even Clan Campbell, paid the price when England so brutally and decisively destroyed the entire clan system following the defeat at Culloden.


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DesertRose 
Posted: 19-Dec-2003, 05:21 PM
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Hope this works. It should be a clan map of Scotland.

http://www.scottishradiance.com/clanmap.htm
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Elspeth 
Posted: 19-Dec-2003, 08:20 PM
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I have not yet affiliated myself with a clan, but if I do it will be the Logan clan. None of my ancestors are of direct enough lineage to claim a place in any clan, but I do have a many great grandmother who was a Logan. I used her name in writing my last book, researching the clan in the process. Below is a little history from the Clan Logan in North America site


Historical Background:
Research has shown that the Clan LOGAN sometime in the dark past; as is the case with many of the Scottish Clans originated in Ireland. Therefore we have branchs of the Clan emigrating from Scotland and Ireland to North America and Canada.

Scotch-Irish; a term which is purely American, was used to distinguish the Presbyterian/Protestant descendents of the deported and relocated highland Scots. Who had been relocated to Northern Ireland by the English, and who emigrated to North America and Canada in the 1700's. As opposed to and distinguish them from the later Catholic immigrants from Ireland.


Ulster-Scots; another term for the Scotch-Irish, as well as the area they emigrated from. This was the part of northern Ireland in which the Scots were resettled by the English. Ulster-Scots is the name they are known by in the United Kingdom.



Clan Logan
Gaelic name: Loganaich or Macgill'innen
The Clan LOGAN is one of these Scottish groups that enmass emigrated to North America and Canada in the very early 1700's, from Ireland and Scotland. These two segments were of the same clan origins. The Clan LOGAN that emigrated from Scotland are of the Lowland Scots who originated in County Galloway. The Highland branch of the Clan claim their origins from County Ross and are closely allied with the Clan MacLennan. It was two members of this Clan LOGAN, Thomas and William Logan who were chosen to take Robert the Bruce's heart to the Holyland. To keep it from the hands of the English. While in route and in Spain they were killed in combat in 1329. The silver case containing the heart of King RObert was return to Scotland.


I believe - that there were many members of this Clan who emigrated, and therefore are directly related, by distant blood. They were all descent of the same Clan origins Logan and Mac Lennan. There is a tie therefore that in many cases is stronger than blood; the CLAN.


Prior to 1890 the Clan's had all but been forgotten; except by a few diehard Scottish Highlanders. The Caledonian District in 1890, organized a reformation of the Clan system by holding the first Highland Games. Every effort was made to restore all aspects of the Scottish Highland culture to the people.


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Compassion is the sometimes fatal capacity for feeling what it is like inside somebody else's skin. It is the knowledge that there can never really be any peace and joy for me until there is peace and joy finally for you too.
- Frederick Buechner



If society prospers at the expense of the intangibles,
how can it be called progress?

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AShruleEgan 
Posted: 20-Dec-2003, 10:52 AM
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This is the story behind Clann Mac Aodhagain.

Mac Aodhagain - MacEgan
Uniquely among Irish Families the MacEgans were distinguished for learning rather than military prowess. They became, over five centuries, Ireland's most learned literary family and have left us an enormous body of medieval Irish and Latin writing. The great codices, the book of Duniry (Leabhar Braec), the Book of Ballymote and the Book of the Dun Cow (Leabhar na hUidre) are associated with them.

To Michael O Cleirigh, principal author of Annala na hEireann Baothghalach Ruadh MacAodhagain was "the most learned Irishman that ever lived". When the annals were compiled in 1636 O'Cleirigh sought an approbation from six of the most learned men in the Country for the work, the first being Flann MacAodhagain of Ballymacegan and Redwood Castle, while Baothghalach MacAodhagain, Bishop of Elphin was third on the list.

The Brehon (Judge) and Ollave (Professor) ranked among the highest in the Irish society, and the MacEgans were the outstanding hereditary holders of these offices. Throughout the annals there are numerous references to various members of the family noteworthy for their achievements in this field. As brehons and ollaves they became attached to many Irish territories and later when the Normans adopted the Irish Language, law and custom, MacEgan brehons were retained by them.

The Family is descended from Cairbre Crom, chief of Hy Many in the 6th Century and has as its eponymous ancestor Aedhagan, who flourished in the 10th century, making the surname one of the oldest in Europe. It is derived from the root 'aedh' meaning fire and the diminutive 'an' hence 'the little bright-eyed one'.

Because they were associated with the chieftains in all parts of the country their descendants are widespread. Among the O'Kennedys of Lower Ormand in North Tipperary they became particularly string. There are a number of their castles still standing, and one of these, Redwood, where a celebrated law school flourished, has now been fully restored and is owned and occupied by Chief of the Clan.

Like other Irish Families who did not conform they lost all, but preserved the educational tradition throughout the Penal Times. After Emancipation in 1829 many of the name followed their hereditary professions of teaching, law and medicine.


Pronunciation and Spelling
Mac Aodhagàin (mock-ay-gon)
The root of this name is Aedh (ay). The son of Aedh would have been Mac (mock), and gàin (gon), being the diminutive form of any word, would have been used to indicate the lesser of, (or in this case the descendant of), the root word, so Mac Aedhgàin would have been the descendant of the son of Aedh.

In the past, the spelling was Mac Aedgàin - the h having been replaced by a dot over the D. This was also seen as Aodagàin, again with a dot over the D. The first is now very seldom seen.

In the first half of the 1900's, modern Irish spelling contracted the name to Mac Aogàin, retaining the same pronunciation as the full Mac Aodhagàin, however English pronunciation changed this to Mac Egan. We currently know of only two families, one in West Kerry and one in Australia using the Mac Aogàin spelling.

The Mac Aodhagàins began in East Gallway and gradually moved to North Tipperary, just a few miles away, settling in Redwood Castle. Once there, their power as judges (brehons), to the powerful area rulers, (including the Kennedy family), kept the clan well cared for and somewhat isolated from the rest of the country. Therefore, as one moves away from the heartland, one starts to see all the various spellings of the name, mainly because no one from outside the area knew precisely how to spell it.

The name Keegan is an understandable variation as well, as there is no K in the Irish language, but, the Irish pronunciation of Mac being mock, would prompt an Englishman to include a K, therefore Mock-ay-gon, losing the Mac, became K-ay-gon, or Keegan. It is interesting to note that in Antrim, Ireland and in parts of Scotland, there are several Mac Keegan families.

In the center of Ireland, near the original Clan area, Egan is still pronounced Ay-gon. If you imagine people arriving in the US with the name Aogàin, perhaps knowing only the pronunciation, it is easy to see the formation of the differing spellings that have survived today: Eagan, Egan, Eagen, Agen, Egen, Hegane and Hagen. Egan is the spelling now most commonly used.


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Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 
Posted: 21-Dec-2003, 07:53 AM
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Sounds very much like a clan in the Druid tradition, although I suppose the use of the term Druid itself has been very much suppressed over the centuries. Certainly, the professions mentioned in association with the McEgans are very much consistent with what little I know of the historical (as distinguishesd from the romanticized or villified) Druids. A proud history, indeed!
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Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 22-Dec-2003, 05:33 PM
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The Irish-Christian Society is nicely depicted in the "Sister Fidelma" books by Ellis Peters, which is a synonym for Peter Beresford-Ellis, Professor of Irish History.

My Irish ancestor was a Shaughnessy. Her family lived in the county clare, and were more english than irish although having an irish name.
Her family were breeders of thoroughbreds, which is how she is connected to my family. My ancestor and her met in Ireland during a hunt, while my ancestor was looking for horses to refresh the blood of his own stud.

I have no scottish ancestors but many Germans wink.gif


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Northern Lass 
Posted: 29-Dec-2003, 01:31 AM
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I am descended from the Watson Family in the Peninsula of Kintyre, Argyll County. My ancestors farmed in the area for over 400 years. My great-great grandfather emigrated to Pensylvannia in the mid 1800's. He unfortunately died not long after. His son, Robert Watson moved to the west and married Sarah Anne Cunningham in Nevada and they settled in the Tahoe City. Our family was one the founding families in Tahoe City and a museum was built in a family home along main street. My grand-father left California for the goldfields of the Yukon, Canada.. He met and married my grand-mother, Adela Stone and my mother was born as well as 3 other siblings. That's my very short version of a very interesting and difficult trek from Scoltand to the Yukon!

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Angel Whitefang (Rider) 
Posted: 23-Jan-2004, 02:01 AM
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These are the Clans I am related to according to my Mothers Geneology and according to the tartan website. there is information I have posted in here from both places. Are any of you from any of these clans??? And this was using my Fathers Sir name Not my Mothers.

Arthur Bannatyne Burnes Burness Burnett Burns Connochie Conochie Denoon Denune Gibbon Gibson Harres Harris Hawes Haws Hawson Isaac Isaacs Iverson Kellar Keller Kissack Kissock Lorne MacArtair MacArthur MacCarter MacColm MacColmbe MacConachie MacConchie MacConnechy MacConochie MacEller MacElvie MacGibbon MacEver MacGlasrich MacGubbin MacGure MacIsaac MacIver MacIvor MacKellar MacKelvie MacKerlie MacKerlich MacKessack MacKessock MacKissoch MacLaws MacLehose MacNichol MacNocaird MacOnachie MacOran MacOwen MacPhedran MacPhun MacTause MacTavish MacThomas MacUre Moore Muir Ochiltree Orr Pinkerton Taweson Tawesson Thomas Thomason Thompson Thomson Ure;

Breadalbane names: MacDermid MacDermott MacDiarmid
Cawdor names: Caddell Cadell Calder Cattell Torrie Torry

Loudoun names: Hastings Loudon Loudoun Lowdon

Posted From the Tartan web site:

The surname Campbell, most probably derived from the Gaelic cam-beul (twisted mouth), is one of the oldest in the Highland, and a crown charter of 1368 acknowledges Duncan MacDuihbne as founder of the Campbells, who were established as Lords of Loch Awe. The founder of the Argyll line was Cailean Mór (d. 1294), whose descendant, Colin Campbell (d. 1493), 1st Earl of Argyll, married Isabel Stewart of Lorne. To this day the eldes son of the family has borne the title of Marquis of Lorne, and the marriage in 1871 of the Marquis, later 9th Duke of Argyll, to HRH Princess Louise, fourth daughter of Queen Victoria, is recalled by the two tartans bearing their names.

Throughout the fifteenth century the Campbells gave steady support to the Crown in an area where royal influence was under severe pressure, first from the rival Crown of Norway and then from the descendants of Somerled, former Lord of the Isles, with the eventual emergence of the Crown's most powerful rival in the MacDonald Lordship of the Isles. The Lordship of the Isls was broken by the Crown by the end of the fifteenth century, leaving the Campbells the main power in the area. Thereafter they continued to act as the chief instrument of central authority in the region. This long struggle for supremacy, and with it, the headship of the Gael, may be said to be the real cause for the ancient enmity between the Campbells and the MacDonalds.

Campbell support for central government brought rewards. In 1607 Archibald, seventh Earl of Argyll, was granted former MacDonald lands in Kintyre, while in 1615 Campbell of Cawdor was allowed to purchase Islay and most of Jura which had previously belonged to the Macleans of Duart.

Sir John Campbell (1635-1716), 11th Laird of Glenorchy, was created Earl of Breadalbane in 1681. Described as being "cunning as a fox, wise as a serpent, and supple as an eel... [who] knew neither honour nor religion but where they are mixed with interest", he was involved in the scheming which resulted in the Massacre of Glencoe, but no evidence of his guilt could be produced. His line was founded by the colourful crusader "Black" Colin Campbell (d. 1498), who received Glenorchy in 1432 from his father, Sir Duncan Campbell, who had ejected the MacGregors from the lands. The commander who actually carried out the infamous Massacre of the MacIan MacDonald's of Glencoe was a Campbell Chieftain of Glenlyon. The founder of the Cawdor branch, another Sir John Campbell (d. 1546). An orphan who had inherited her father's title of Thane of Cawdor, she was kidnapped in 1499 by Campbell?s father, Archibald (d. 1513), 2nd Earl of Argyll, and married to his son in 1510. The Campbells of Loudoun are descended from Sir Duncan Campbell, second of the first MacCailean Mór, who married a Crauford of Loudoun. The Earldom of Loudoun, created for John Campbell (1598-1663), politician, has since the eighteenth century descended through the female line.

Arguably the most famous Campbell of them all, Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863), commander of the Highland Brigade at Balaclava, Commander-in-Chief during the Indian Mutiny, the hero of Lucknow and Cawnpore, was not strictly a Campbell at all, being born Colin MacLiver, son of a Glasgow carpenter. His mother was a Campbell, though, and when her brother, Colonel John Campbell, took the fifteen-year-old boy to be interviewed for the Army by the Duke of York, the Duke wrote his name down as Campbell. And Campbell it remained.

The Clan Campbell is now organized world-wide in several associations and societies connected to the Clan Campbell Federation. The current Chief is the twelfth Duke of Argyll and twenty-sixth Chief. Inveraray Castle is still his family home.




What a history! and that's only part of it!!!!!

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