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> Clan Mccullough, Mac Cullaich, Mac Cú Uladh
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Shamalama 
Posted: 29-Jun-2004, 09:53 AM
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While not in the list of the hundred most numerous surnames in Ireland, MacCullagh, MacCullough and other spelling variants such as MacCollough and MacCulloch combined constitute one of our most numerous names, with an estimated population in Ireland of nearly 5,000 persons. Together they constitute one of the fifty most common names in Ulster and eighty to ninety per cent of those of the name in Ireland are of that province, principally Antrim, Down and Tyrone.

Petty's ?census? reveals a similar position in 1659, when MacCullough and variants was listed as among the principal Irish names in the baronies of Antrim, Belfast, Carrickfergus and Toome in Co. Antrim and Lower Iveagh in Co. Down. In the previous century the Annals of Loch Cé tell us that Seamus Mac Con Uladh was killed at Dunbo (near Coleraine) in 1532. This name is given by the learned editor in his index as MacCullagh. Today in Ulster about one-third use the -agh ending and most of the remainder the -ough, although MacCullow and MacCulloch are also found. The -ough spelling is very much more common in counties Antrim and Down, but it must be remembered that the spellings do not necessarily denote the origins of any particular family.

Treating of Mac Con Uladh (son of the hound of Ulster) Woulfe gives MacAnully, MacNully, MacAnaul, MacCullow etc., but not MacCullough as a modern or early anglicised form. According to him the Irish form of MacCullough is Mac Colla (sometimes Mac Collach) derived from Colla, a personal name in use in MacDonnell and MacSweeney families. Woulfe's opinion cannot be accepted here. There is no doubt that the Irish form of MacCullough is either Mac Cú Uladh or Mac Con Uladh. The reason for the alternative forms is that in later times Cú Uladh was regarded as one word and so cú did not change in the genitive. From the later form came the pronunciation which gave the anglicisation MacCullough. Dr. Hayes-McCoy considered that the MacCollas were galloglass families.

The most exhaustive source for sixteenth century Irish surnames is the Fiants: therein we find MacAnulla (Belfast); but MacColla, MacCullo© and MacCullowe were mainly Connacht, though occasionally Ulster. The Composition Book of Connacht (1585) records Rory MacCollo of Beeklone, Co. Galway, and Rory MacHugh MacCullogh of Bollindrone, Co. Sligo, as men of substance. As the large scale migration from north-west Ulster to north Connacht did not take place until the next century it would appear that there was an independent sept of MacCullough originating in north Connacht, though it must be observed that there is no mention of such in the Tribes and Customs of Hy Fiachrach or in the Annals of Connacht, except for the 1532 death recorded in those of Loch Cé and noted above.

The name MacCulloch is also that of an important Scottish family. This name is traditionally derived from the Scots-Gaelic word culach, a boar, and in this connection it is interesting to note that in Co. Sligo, within living memory, Boar and Bower were in use as synonyms of MacCullagh. These MacCulloughs can be of two origins. MacCulloch is and was common in the province of Galloway, whence stemmed so many of the Ulster settlers. Its origins, however, are totally obscure, and although it has been suggested that it derives from the Scots Gaelic Mac Cullaich, it is possible that it too derives from Mac Cú Uladh and represents previous Irish settlers in Galloway. This theory is reinforced by the fact that the MacCulloughs of Ireland and the MacCollochs of Scotland claim similar coats of arms.

Either way, it is known that it makes its first appearance in the Scottish records in 1296, when Thomas Maculagh del counte de Wiggetone (now Wigtown) rendered homage to Edward I. His family later held castles at Gatehouse of Fleet in Kirkcudbrightshire, and Creetown and Port William in Wigtownshire. It was in Galloway that the softened form MacCully arose, though it is also found in Tyrone as a variant of the Ulster name MacCullough or MacCullagh. (Cully as a native Ulster name can derive from MacCullough, especially in Tyrone, or from O'Cully, Gaelic Ó Colla, a name from counties Armagh and Antrim.) Also in Wigtownshire, many of the Kellys and MacKellys changed their name to MacCulloch.

Yet another connection of MacCulloughs, those of Oban in Argyllshire, belonged to Clan Dougall and were originally called MacLulich. This name, in Gaelic Mac Lulaich, meant 'son of Lulach' (an obsolete personal name derived from the Old Gaelic ?lu? and ?laogh?, meaning ?little calf?). The progenitor of this family was MacCulloch Lulach, the son of Gillacomgan, Mormaer of Moray. MacCulloch Lulach became King of Scots when (notwithstanding Shakespeare's account) he succeeded MacBeth. Within a matter of months, however, he too was killed and was succeeded by Malcolm Canmore, circa 1157.

James MacCulloch of Wigtownshire was one of the fifty Scottish undertakers of the Ulster Plantation and in 1610 he was granted 1000 acres in Glenties in Donegal. Though he lost his grant four years later, he and his tenants remained.

- McColloch Family Heritage & Genealogical Research Site: http://www.mccolloch.com/
- McCullough Genealogy: http://www.fred.net/slowup/geneol.html
- McCullough Genealogy: http://www.mcculloughgenealogy.info/
- History of Clan MacCulloch: http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/Heritage/FSCNS/S...MacCulloch.html
- McCullough Genealogy: http://www.fred.net/slowup/mcculloughgenealogy.html
- Clan McCulloch: http://www.myclan.com/clans/McCulloch_267/
- My genealogy website: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users...-Mccullough-GA/
- BIG PICTURE of the McCullough tartan: http://www.tartansauthority-shop.com/tarta...n_lr/003340.gif
- The MacCulloch/MacCullogh Tartan: http://www.fred.net/slowup/drafttar.html
- Early Scottish Weapons: http://www.tartansauthority.com/Web/Site/H...ss/Weaponry.asp
- Map of old County Antrim, Ireland: http://www.ulsterancestry.com/Map-Antrim.html
- The Plantation of Ireland and the Scotch-Irish: http://www.tartans.com/articles/plantationmain.html
- Ulster Historical Foundation: http://www.ancestryireland.co.uk/
- The Ulster-Scots: http://www.motherbedford.com/Irish.htm
- Caledonia Land Deed - own a piece of Scotland: http://www.squareinchland.com/thedeed.asp
- Chester County, South Carolina, history website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~scchest2/scchester.htm


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Clan Mac Cullaich:
- Brewed in Scotland
- Bottled in Ulster
- Uncorked in America

Common Folk Using Common Sense
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Shamalama 
Posted: 29-Jun-2004, 04:33 PM
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Clan MacCulloch is listed as a sept to the Clans MacDougall, Ross, Munro, and Gunn. As a sept to the mentioned clans, members of Clan MacCulloch may wear the tartan of those clans. And, since Clan MacCulloch owned lands in the Galloway District, clan members may also wear the Galloway District tartan.

Surname variations include (whew, what a list):

Collo, Colloe, Colloh, Collough, Collow, Collowe, Collugh, Colough, Coulloch, Coulo, Couloe, Couloh, Coulough, Coulow, Coulowe, Culagh, Culla, Cullach, Cullack, Cullagh, Cullake, Cullaugh, Cullech, Culleck, Cullick, Cullie, Culligh, Cullitch, Cullo, Culloch, Cullock, Culloe, Cullogh, Culloh, Cullouch, Cullough, Cullowe, Cullox, Cullyck, Cullyke, Culoch, Lulich, MacCalaogh, MacCalaugh, MacCallaogh, MacCallaugh, MacCollo, MacColloch, MacColloe, MacColloh, MacCollough, MacCollow, MacCollowe, MacCollugh, MacColoch, MacColough, MacColugh, MacCoulloch, MacCoulo, MacCouloch, MacCouloe, MacCouloh, MacCoulough, MacCoulow, MacCoulowe, MacCula, MacCulagh, MacCulaugh, Macculey, MacCulie, MacCuligh, MacCulla, MacCullar, MacCullach, MacCullack, MacCullagh, MacCullake, MacCullaugh, MacCullech, MacCulleck, MacCuller, MacCulley, MacCullick, MacCullie, MacCulligh, MacCullitch, MacCullo, MacCulloch, MacCullock, MacCulloe, MacCullogh, MacCulloh, Maccullok, MacCullouch, MacCullough, MacCullow, MacCullowe, MacCullox, MacCully, MacCullyck, MacCullyke ,MacCuloch, MacCulock, MacCulogh, MacCulouch, MacCulough, MacCuly, MacLulich, McCalaogh, McCalaugh, McCallaogh, McCallaugh, McCollo, McColloch, McColloe, McColloh, McCollough, McCollow, McCollowe, McCollugh, McColoch, McColough, McColugh, McCoulloch, McCoulo, McCouloch, McCouloe, McCouloh, McCoulough, McCoulow, McCoulowe, McCula, McCulagh, McCulaugh, McCuley, McCulie, McCuligh, McCulla, McCullach, McCullack, McCullagh, McCullake, McCullar, McCullaugh, McCullech, McCulleck, McCuller, McCulley, McCullick, McCullie, McCulligh, McCullitch, McCullo, McCulloch, McCullock, McCulloe, McCullogh, McCulloh, McCullok, McCullouch, McCullough, McCullowe, McCullox, McCully, McCullyck, McCullyke, McCuloch, McCulock, McCulogh, McCulouch, McCulough, McCuly, McLulich
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Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 
Posted: 05-Jul-2004, 09:39 AM
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Here's a bit of info I dug out of one of my research files:
QUOTE
John McCullough married twice, in Ireland, one son to each marriage. He was  widowed twice.

John McCulloch brought his two sons, Thomas and Samuel, to America between 1728 and December 1735.

"My Grandparents told stories of the McCulloch family many times when I was growing up.  One of the stories was about how both the (McCu) llogh's and the (McCu) lloch's were both from the same family, a Lord or Baren or something of that sort, who's son had his head lopped off. I was told that one side of the family took the "ough" spelling, after having been born in Ireland of Scottish parents, to protect themselves from the law, because of some criminal activities that had been perpetrated by them.  When the various sides of the family migrated to the United States the "ough" side was supposed to have gone to Ohio, while the "och's" ended up in West Virginia.  Grandpa always said that "the "ough's" were all a bunch of cattle thieves, so ought to have done well in their new land...."  I found that my father and my uncle were told much the same stories.  It was very confusing unraveling all the Ough's and Och's but I think I've come pretty close. Note:  Delores M. McCulloch.


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Síochán leat,
Mailagnas
Clan Donald USA
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Shamalama 
Posted: 27-Dec-2004, 07:27 AM
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Brother MMD,

I had a hard drive crash last summer and a great deal of my genealogical research data was lost. I'm JUST NOW starting to get everything put back into place.

Do you have any way to contact Delores M. McCulloch? The "John McCulloch brought his two sons, Thomas and Samuel, to America between 1728 and December 1735" is almost exactly what I've been told about MY ancestors.

Be sure and tell her that us "-ough's" have quit stealing cattle. biggrin.gif
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