Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )
   Mobile App






Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> For The Grill, charcoal, propane, or wood cooking
Bookmark and Share
Shadows 
Posted: 07-Sep-2004, 01:53 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male








Weber Recipes
Cornish Hens with Garlic-Mint Butter

A little seasoned butter nestled between the skin and flesh keeps these beauties savory and succulent.





For the butter:

1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh mint
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon grated lime zest
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

4 Cornish hens, 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 pounds each, wingtips removed


To make the butter: Place the softened butter in a small bowl. Combine the garlic and salt on a cutting board. Finely chop them and, using the side of the knife, crush the mixture into a paste. Add the paste to the bowl along with the remaining butter ingredients.

Remove the giblets from the hens and discard. Rinse the hens, inside and out, under cold water and pat dry with paper towels. Working from the cavity end of each hen, run your fingers between the skin and flesh of the breasts and legs to loosen the skin without tearing. Push half of the butter mixture under the skin and massage from the outside to spread the butter mixture evenly over the breasts and legs. Spread the remaining butter over the entire surface of the hens.

Truss the hens with cotton string. Grill over Indirect Medium heat until the juices run clear and the meat is no longer pink at the bone, 35 to 45 minutes. Transfer the hens onto a cutting board. Loosely cover with foil and allow to rest for about 5 minutes. Using poultry shears or a sharp knife, remove the strings. Serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings.



--------------------
I support the separation of church and hate!

IMAGINATION - the freest and largest nation in the world!


One can not profess to be of "GOD" and show intolerence and prejudice towards the beliefs of others.

Am fear nach gleidh na h–airm san t–sith, cha bhi iad aige ’n am a’ chogaidh.
He that keeps not his arms in time of peace will have none in time of war.

"We're all in this together , in the parking lot between faith and fear" ... O.C.M.S.

“Beasts feed; man eats; only the man of intellect knows how to eat well.”

"Without food we are nothing, without history we are lost." - SHADOWS


Is iomadh duine laghach a mhill an Creideamh.
Religion has spoiled many a good man.

The clan MacEwen
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 06-Oct-2004, 10:02 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Recipe Name: Chipotle Poblano Sauce
Category: GRILL
Serves: 6

SOURCE BARBEQUE AND GRILLING WEB PAGE - ABOUT.COM

1 Large onion, chipped
6 chipotles
8 Clove garlic, minced
1 poblano
1/2 Cup water
1 Tblsp olive oil
1/2 Tsp. oregano
1/2 Tsp. cumin seed
pinch salt

Soak chipotles and poblano pepper in the 1/2 cup of water for about 15 minutes or until they have softened. Meanwhile saute onion and garlic in a pan over high heat. Let them get good and brown. Pour into a food processor with the oil. Remove chiles from water and pour the water into the food processor (or blender). Remove stems and seeds from chipoltes and poblano and place in food processor with remaining ingredients and blend into a thick sauce.

Serve as is or use as a basting sauce from grilling most anything
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
freekenny 
Posted: 03-Nov-2004, 05:07 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 724
Joined: 07-Jul-2004
ZodiacWillow

Realm: Beaches of North Carolina & Mountains of Kentucky

female





O'siyo,
~ Anyone else going to do their Turkey or other meat on the grill/smoker this Holiday Season? chef.gif I'll be smokin' a turkey and a duck..it is divine and is so easy wink.gif
~I 'stand' my turkey up with an aluminum container of beer, red merlot, sage, onion and orange mint~ While the turkey smokes the liquid evaporates and 'cooks' into the turkey..gives it a marvelous flavour and keeps it tender!
~ When I smoke my duck, I make certain its fresh or completely thawed by the day before I am going to put it in the smoker~ I use orange marmalade warmed in a saucpan over low heat as a marinade~ I rub the entire duck in the warmed marmalade and let it sit in the fridge over night~ It forms a wonderful glaze as it smokes and the taste is unmatched! tongue.gif An apple marinade is good too! Stuff cavity with fresh mandarine oranges or fresh apple chunks mixed with apple sauce..Yummy! chef.gif
~~Sty-U red_bandana.gif


--------------------
I always knew one day I would travel this road;I just did not know that today would be the day....

'Each man is good in his sight. It is not necessary for eagles to be crows' --Sitting Bull

'Why do you take by force what you could obtain by love?'
--Powhatan

'HeartAches mend, HeartBreaks are everlasting'-- my own quote, seeker
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 15-Oct-2005, 10:42 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Recipe Name: GRILLED STEAK WITH OLIVE-STILTON CHEESE
Category: GRILL
Serves: 4

4 6 oz beef tenderloin steaks cut 1-1/4-inches thick
1 cup canned beef broth
1/2 cup thinly sliced shallots (or chopped onion)
1/2 Cup sliced black or green olives
1/2 Cup port wine
1/4 Cup crumbled Blue Stilton cheese
1 tables butter
1 tables chopped fresh thyme
1/2 teaspo salt
1/2 teaspo freshly ground black pepper

Heat butter in a heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add shallots and saute 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add broth and wine and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until sauce has reduced to 1/2 cup, about 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, season steaks* with salt and pepper. Grill or broil until cooked to desired doneness.

Remove sauce from heat and stir in olives**, cheese and thyme. Arrange steaks on warm plates and top with the sauce.

** I have used garlic stuffed olives for this to add a kick to the flavor.

* I have used this recipe with venison with great results.
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 15-Apr-2006, 09:27 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Grill time is here again ( I never stopped, LOL! ) as well as spring...

This recipe is one of my favorite early season grill recipes...

Recipe Name: BALSAMIC MARINADED SIRLOIN AND ASPARAGUS
Category: BEEF
Serves: 4

AN ELEGANT DINNER FROM THE GRILL.

1 bonele beef top sirloin steak
cut 1-inch thick (about 1-1/4 lbs.)
1 lb. fresh asparagus trimmed
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
2 Tbsp. olive oil
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh basil
1 1/2 tsp. Dijon-style mustard
1 clove garlic crushed
1/2 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper

In a small bowl, combine vinegar, oil, basil, mustard, garlic and sugar
to make marinade. Place steak and 1/3-cup of the marinade in
a sealable plastic bag. Close bag securely, turn to coat steak and
marinate in refrigerator 15 minutes to 2 hours, turning occasionally.

Cover and refrigerate remaining marinade. Meanwhile, bring 1-inch of
water to a boil in a large skillet. Add the asparagus and reduce heat to
medium-low. Cover and cook 2-3 minutes or until asparagus is just
crisp-tender. ( I personally would place a steamer basket over the boiling water and stem, less soggy ). Drain asparagus and combine with the reserved marinade
tossing to coat.

Remove the steak from the marinade and discard the marinade. Place steak on
grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill uncovered for 17-21 minutes for
medium rare to medium doneness, turning occasionally. During the last 3
minutes of grilling, arrange asparagus on grid around the steak. Grill 3 minutes,
turning once. Season steak and asparagus with the salt and pepper.
Carve steak crosswise into slices and serve with the asparagus.
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 20-May-2006, 10:05 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Grilled Blue Cheese Stuffed Tomatoes

serves 4 ( down sizes nicely for 2 )

These grilled tomatoes are rich in flavor, yet simple to prepare. Remember to look for large ripe tomatoes for this recipe.


4 large tomatoes, cut in half crosswise and seeded
3/4 cup crumbled blue cheese
1/4 cup parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh basil or oregano, chopped


Preheat grill for medium heat. Scoop out seeds from tomatoes. Combine cheeses, and basil in a small bowl. Fill tomatoes with mixture. Top each tomato off with olive oil. Place tomatoes skin side down on a disposable foil pan or triple thick foil sheet. Cook for 12-15 minutes, until tomatoes begin to soften and cheese has melted. Remove from grill and serve.
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 23-Jun-2007, 06:05 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Note this is NOT mine. I got this via email from a friend. And since at least two of the folks on this forum are BBQ impared... Dang.. I should have had this up for Father's Day.

~~~~~~~~~~~~
M. L. McLemore's Lone Star Baste
Serving Size : 1 servings.


For those of you who like barbecue, I offer one of my late father's concoctions for basting, which I learned today is also called the mop (thanks, Richard).

M. L. McLemore's Lone Star Baste
(as remembered by his daughter, Martha)

2 6-packs of Lone Star beer, one on ice, the other one doesn't matter
1 quart of cheap vinegar (better to scrimp on the vinegar than on the beer)
1 small bottle Tabasco, no substitutes
1 large head of garlic, peeled and finely minced
1 4-ounce can black pepper
1 small jar French's yellow mustard (baby cr*p, he called it, but he ate it on almost everything - go figure!)
6 dried jalapeno peppers, crushed, seeds and all (firecrackers, he called them)
1 pound of butter, melted (none of that greasy margarine, for crissake!)
1 more 6-pack of Lone Star, on ice
1 50 pound bag of ice
1 side of beef or one h*lluva big pig
2 young'uns with fly swatters, on rotating shifts (there were 6 of us at the time)
1 wheel of cheddar, the kind that smells like work socks at the end of the day
2 boxes of crackers
1 case of Pik coils
2 lawn chairs, one for his butt, one for his feet
1 Stetson; his cookin' hat, not the one he wore to the rodeo
1 pair of shades, made out of welder's glass
2 cartons Lucky Strikes or Camels (filters?! Real men don't smoke filtered butts, what's the matter with you, FOOL?!) [Ahem I will speak up here.. It should be Marlboro]
1 Zippo lighter, circa 1943, extra flints and fluid
1 more 6-pack of Lone Star, on ice
1 loud, wind-up alarm clock, the one he called "The Voice of God"
2 50-pound bags of mesquite or pecan chips, soaked in water overnight in the dogs' washtub, which was actually one of those galvanized cattle troughs - nothing was too good for his 'dawgs'. (Jealous of his dogs, you say? Dam right, I was! He never hit his dogs and they didn't have to swat flies for him!)
1 6-pack of Pabst Blue Ribbon, ice optional (Never give the good stuff to the neighbors who wandered over, but always have something to give them! M. L.'s personal Code of the West.)

Empty one 6-pack of Lone Star into a 3 gallon stock pot. Add the vinegar, mustard, Tabasco, butter, peppers, garlic and a fifth of water. Bring to a high, rollin' boil to melt the butter; keep hot on the cool end of the grill.

Fire up the cooker when you get home on Friday night. Burn a couple or three mesquite logs (his preference) to get a foot-thick bed of cherry-red coals. Close the grill to keep in the heat. Add sufficient wet chips to produce enough smoke that the new neighbors call the fire department, but not so much that you put out the fire. (Long-time neighbors just bring in the wash, close their windows and wait him out.)

When the smoke dies down so you can get near the grill, unearth the beast of honor from the washtub, rub it dry, sprinkle with the lightest coat of salt and brown sugar, lay the carcass on the grill. Quick, close the lid and prepare for the rest of the event.

Ice down the rest of the beer in the washtub. (H*ll, yes, in the same water! Just add more ice; eventually the water won't be pink anymore. Besides, you don't drink the water, now, do you?)

Set up "camp," as it were. Send the kids after whatever you forgot, like the Coleman lantern, your long-sleeved shirt and the TV-trays. And the pie-screen, to keep the bugs off the cheese. Those tiny sweet pickles and another jar of mustard. And that little portable transistor radio, don't forget the extra batteries.

Every half-hour or so, check the coals and the beast. Add chips to the one and baste the other. In the beginning, it's easy to keep which is which straight, but by Saturday afternoon, when this repast is *supposed* to be ready, the longs hours of no sleep and Lone Star have taken their toll. It was not uncommon to find wood chips charred to the carcass and the favorite basting brush singed beyond recognition. (They loved my father down at the paint store; sold him more 3" bristle brushes than any other two stores' customers combined.)

After around 3 am, those of us not on bug patrol were no longer awakened by the "Voice of God", M. L. having tossed it across the highway into the oil field. I think it gave him no end of joy to imagine that clock coming to rest next to some aged rattlesnake, vibrating the old viper out of its last 6 buttons, at least.

In the morning, the rest of us would enjoy a good breakfast then wander out to see how the sacrifice was coming along. Daddy's breakfast empties were neatly placed back into the wooden case, courtesy the second shift bug patrol, or my mother. I guess she didn't object to his drinking in public, as long as he didn't appear to be a slob about it.

He hardly ever used the full case of Pik coils. After midnight or so, no self-respecting mosquito or fly came with 100 yards of M. L. or the grill. If the beer didn't do the trick, there was always that marvelous baste simmering on the back of the grill.

Although the bugs gave Daddy's barbecue a wide berth, he had to quietly let only a few trusted friends know when he was planning to cook because his was the absolute best barbecue for miles and miles around. Even his enemies acknowledged his expertise: "That McLemore is one sorry s.o.b., but god-almighty, can that man cook!"
Around noon, the friends who were invited and the dogs' pals began to gather. You know how it is said that dogs and their owners often resemble one another after a few years of cohabitation?

Well, you could certainly tell which of the 20 or so mutts criss-crossing our yard on barbecue day belonged to Daddy. They were the ones lapping up spilled Lone Star, wolfing down stinky cheddar loaded with mustard, and the only ones all the other dogs refused to sniff.

There's a recipe somewhere in all of this, but danged if I remember where I put it.

wink.gif tongue.gif biggrin.gif unsure.gif
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
blackcloud1129 
Posted: 23-Jun-2007, 11:50 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Celtic Guardian
Group Icon

Group: Founder
Posts: 528
Joined: 20-Jun-2005
ZodiacElder

Realm: Hudson Valley

male





That is a fun story
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 11-Apr-2008, 06:15 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





(BUMP)

It is that time of year again!
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 16-Jul-2008, 06:29 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Bumping again!

Anyone have some new stuff to share for BBQ and Grill cooking?
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
stoirmeil 
Posted: 15-Aug-2008, 07:00 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 3,581
Joined: 07-Nov-2004
ZodiacBirch

Realm: New York







Stuffed peppers as a side dish, to go with chicken grill:

--ripe sweet red peppers, cored and seeded, blanched in hot water to soften, one big pepper per person
--enough rice to loosely fill them (I like brown rice), cooked but still firm, and still warm
--the livers, hearts, etc. from the chickens you are grilling, washed
--ground chipotle pepper, some fresh or dried thyme and oregano, to taste
--couple of big onions, semi-fine chopped
--several cloves of garlic
--fresh mushrooms, sliced
--bit of salt to taste
--olive oil for the frying pan


Now, this sounds weird and looks gross before it's cooked, but it works really well with the rice as a stuffing. Put the livers etc., garlic, salt and herbs in the blender and liquefy. Heat the fry pan with several tablespoons olive oil; when it is moderately hot, pour the liver puree in, add the chopped onions and mushrooms, and stir while sauteeing. (Rinse the blender well, immediately, or you will regret the cleaning later when the liver goo sets). The liver mix will cook to a soft crumbly texture like very finely ground meat. Toss this with the rice, stuff the peppers, wrap them loosely in foil, and set on the side of the grill to cook for 20 minutes or so. A minute or two before serving, take off foil and move the peppers closer to the centre of the grill to get the nice charred stripes on them, and also the smoke flavor, turning them once. Try to keep the dogs away -- they love this stuffing enough to burn their fool mouths on it.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 06-Jun-2009, 09:35 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Bump
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
MDF3530 
Posted: 06-Jun-2009, 10:53 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Madman with a box
Group Icon

Group: Scotland
Posts: 7,287
Joined: 30-Jul-2002
ZodiacAlder

Realm: Midlothian, IL

male





I've posted this before.

I got this out of the Better Homes & Gardens Grilling Cookbook.

NAME: CINNAMON PORK CHOP RUB
CATEGORY: SPICES, RUBS & MARINADES

1 tablespoon cinnamon
1/2 tablespoon of dried thyme
1/4 tablespoon of onion salt
1/4 tablespoon of dried mustard
Pinch of sugar if desired

Mix ingredients together in a small bowl. Spoon onto pork chops and rub it on. Save some to add as extra flavoring later.


--------------------
Mike F.

May the Irish hills caress you.
May her lakes and rivers bless you.
May the luck of the Irish enfold you.
May the blessings of Saint Patrick behold you.


user posted image
PMEmail PosterMy Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 03-Apr-2010, 09:56 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





It is that time of year again!

Bumping this topic back to the top.
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 25-Jun-2012, 12:53 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,157
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





We have been grilling for some time already this year...

Has anyone else been enjoying one of the best forms of cooking yet this year?

Share your recipes for the grill or smoker here.
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

 








Celtic RadioTM broadcasts through Live365.com and StreamLicensing.com which are officially licensed under SoundExchange, ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and SOCAN.
©2014 Celtic Radio Network, Highlander Radio, Celtic Moon, Celtic Dance, Ye O' Celtic Pub and Celt-Rock-Radio.
All rights and trademarks reserved. Read our Privacy Policy.
Celtic Graphics ©2014, Cari Buziak


Link to CelticRadio.net!
Link to CelticRadio.net
View Broadcast Status and Statistics!

Best Viewed With IE 8.0 (1680 x 1050 Resolution), Javascript & Cookies Enabled.


[Home] [Top]

Celtic Hearts Gallery | Celtic Mates Dating | My Celtic Friends | Celtic Music Radio | Family Heraldry | Medival Kingdom | Top Celtic Sites | Web Celt Blog | Video Celt