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> About Galicia, For those who didn't know... like me!
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WizardofOwls 
Posted: 30-May-2004, 09:23 AM
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Hello all!

I know absolutley nothing about Galicia except that it is in Spain and is one of the seven Celtic nations. since it is one of the new groups needing a moderator, I thought I'd do a little research about it. Here's what I found on the Internet:

Galicia is known in Spain as the "land of the 1000 rivers". Those rivers cross all the region from the mountainous inland to the coast, where they form the characteristical "Rias". The coast itself offers great contrasts, from the smooth beaches of As Mariñas to the dangerous cliffs of Costa de la Muerte, the "coast of death".

The climate of Galicia is tempered, and specially in winter, with minimal temperatures of about 5 degC, quite rainy. During the summer season, maximum temperatures are around 20 degC. Galicia's richdom in water and its Rias are characteristical for its nature. At the area of Rias Altas you will find magnific beaches, impressive towns and beautiful fishing villages. Rías Baixas are worth a visit for their natural preserves and balnearies, as A Toxa. The inland shows green landscapes and romantic villages.

The first cultures which left their tracks in Galicia were Celtic, while Romans left as a legacy the walls of Lugo, the bridge of Ourense, and the Tower of Hercules. Middle Ages were marked by the discovery of the tomb of the Apostle Santiago (Saint James). Thousands of pilgrims made their way to the cathedral of the newly founded town Santiago de Compostela, and the world-famous Way of Santiago (also known as Way of Saint James or Camino Jacobeo), which is flanked with numerous churches, monasteries and chapels of high historical-artistical value, was formed.

Galicia's folklore clearly shows its Celtic and Gaelic origins, and the most characteristical musical instrument is the Gaita (bagpipe). Regional gastronomy is of great reputation for its excellent fish, Empanada Gallega (a typical pie of fish or meat), traditional sweets prepared in some monasteries (where the recipes are kept in secret jalously), and the Ribeiro wine.


Major attractions:

Santiago de Compostela
The capital of Galicia and final destination of the famous pilgimage way is certainly among Spain's most beautiful cities.

A Coruña
This city, of high economical importance, is located at a peninsula. Major attractions include the Romanesque churches, the synagogue and the old quarter which offers an interesting contrast between almost fragile buildings and massive stone palaces.

Vigo
Galicia's most populated city, with the most important port. The historic quarter is very charming and well preserved.

Lugo
Lugo is surrounded by Roman walls which are perfectly preserved, and has a beautiful Romanesque cathedral.

Ourense
Located inland, also has a beautiful Romanesque cathedral.

Pontevedra
This province is said to be one of the most beautiful of Spain, thanks to the marvelous landscapes of Rías Baixas. The city itself offers an outstanding monumental center.

Fascinating place, no? Hope this was as informative to you as it was for me!

I'm in the process of teaching myself Scottish Gaelic, but someday I would also like to learn Spanish!


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Slàn agus beannachd,
Allen R. Alderman

'S i Alba tìr mo chridhe. 'S i Gàidhlig cànan m' anama.
Scotland is the land of my heart. Gaelic is the language of my soul.
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Catriona 
Posted: 30-May-2004, 10:08 AM
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Galicia is a wonderful area.

The old pilgrimage route to Santiago Compostela (in honour os Santiago, aka St James) is an amazing route to take. There are many old 'pilgrim' hotels along the route - which have been inns since the early middle ages... A fascinating area to visit.
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wardrumplayer 
  Posted: 31-May-2004, 07:41 PM
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Just some more info and the suggestion of a group from the region named Brenga Astur. Great Celtic/Iberian/Flamenco/Moorish mix. They have three CD's but I can't find a retailer. walkman.gif

Info is:

The earliest Celtic culture and people known as Protocelts, seem to have originated in a far Eastern zone, The Kurganes, located in between the European Continent and India. This is the reason why all these tribes are identified under the denomination of "Indo-Europeans".
This original area, in the southern part of Russia, stretched by both, the mountainous zones of the Caucasian Mountain range and by the lower parts of extensive steppes located at their bottom (feet) in between the Caspian and the Black Seas. These Indo-European roots of Celtic culture and language are still evident in the oldest Celtic music, which carries a distinct Middle-Eastern flavor.
Along with other Indo-European tribes, and from this zone, the barbarian Celtic tribes invaded Europe around the 2000 B.C. In that moment they are still identified as Protocelts (by the current experts), and will not become the Celts we know until they well settled in Central Europe. They settled first in the areas of Eastern Europe now known as Hungary, Bulgaria, Rumania and the Balkans. During the Bronze Age they continue to spread westward again. By the Iron Age (around 8th to 5th BC), these tribes were firm settled in what is now southwest Germany, eastern France and parts of Switzerland. This is known as the Hallstat period, and is the point at which historians begin calling these people "Celts". After that, in the La Tene period, the Celts spread out into most of Europe, invading much of Germany, France, the Iberian Peninsula (most of Spain and Portugal), and the British Islands and Ireland. Later, Celtic branches turned back eastward again, moving into northern Italy, Bohemia, Silesia, the Balkans and the Eastern European Countries, into Eastern Asia (the Gaulatians). Therefore, at the height of their power in the 1st century BC, the Celts were the dominant ethnic group in much of Europe, and were even dominating the Germanic tribes.
Some of the Celtic groups were the Gauls that fought long and hard against the Roman Empire.
The Celtic Culture also spread over much of the Iberian Peninsula, except for its Southern and Mediterranean coasts. The main Celtic groups in this area were the Celtiberians or "Celts of Iberia" (located in the two plateaus of Central Spain), the Lusitanians who settled in what we know today as Portugal, and the Galaicos, the Ástures and the Cántabros in the Northwest and along the northern coast of Spain.
After its splendor until the 1st century BC, the Celtic culture gradually experienced its decline under the pressure of two fronts: from the south, the powerful Roman Empire and, then, from the north the Germanic tribes. They began to erode the Celt's hold on their territory. Hence, the Celts began to lose their independence and Celtic cultural identity in most of their historic domains. As the invaders moved into Celtic lands, the inhabitants were dispersed, or Romanized, Germanized or, latter, Christianized and vikingized. But in the more remote or less accessible regions that the invaders did not reach or could not conquer, the Celts were able to hold on to their culture and keep it strong.

The people living in those regions, where many Celtic cultural aspects are still very alive today, are considered the inheritors of the ancient Celtic culture. They feel fiercely proud of their Celtic traditions and heritage. The citizens of Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Mann, Wales, Cornwall, Brittany, Asturies, and Galicia are the Celts of modern Europe. They belong to what is today known as the "Celtic Atlantic Arch", and representatives from these eight countries and regions participate in the "Interceltic Festival of Lorient" in Brittany every year.
In all these areas, the Romanization and feminization was little or none, and the Christianization was less intense or more flexible, overlapping with pagan religious aspects. Though the Roman Empire conquered most of the Iberian Peninsula (what is now Spain and Portugal), it could never dislodge two Celtic ethnic groups, the Ástures and the Cántabros, from their wild and unreachable mountain stronghold of Northwestern Spain. They were described by the chronicles of Roman historians as "the most powerful and wild tribes of Hispania." They were very little Romanized (only along the coastal areas) but still Christianized some centuries later. Similar phenomenon happened in some of the other countries that belonged to the historic "Celtic Civilization."

There are many ancient Celtic archeological sites in Asturies today. Many of its churches and buildings incorporate pre-Christian Celtic designs and motifs in their architecture, and many of the rural folk still hold fast to pagan Celtic beliefs.
Just listen to the stirring music of Asturies to hear its obvious Celtic roots!

More information about Asturias: http://www.infoasturias.com

More information about Asturias' pipe: http://www.asturies.com/viesca/gaita


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Wardrumplayer

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Herrerano 
Posted: 01-Jun-2004, 02:28 PM
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Here is the URL for the Xunta de Galicia, a triligual site, english, spanish and galego.

http://www.xunta.es/index.htm


Leo cool.gif


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Ita erat quando hic adveni.

Time is a great teacher, but unfortunatley it kills all its pupils. - Hector Berlioz

"No matter where you go, there you are." - R. Young




¡Visté! ¡Te lo dijé!
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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 03-Jun-2004, 12:04 AM
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Leo, Why don't you think about moderating the Galicia forum...you seem to be the best choice--knowing Español and all. Just a thought!

Cheers,
Roisin angel_not.gif


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Roisin-Teagan

"There, in that hand, on that shoulder under that chin---all of its lightness delicately balanced and its strings skillfully bowed---it becomes a voice."---Rich Mullins

"At 18, if you have oversized aspirations, the whole world sees you as a dreamer. At 40, you get the reputation for being a visionary." ---Rich Mullins

"God gives the gifts where He finds the vessel empty enough to receive them."---C.S. Lewis

Éire go Brách!
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Herrerano 
Posted: 03-Jun-2004, 05:11 PM
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Interestingly, Galicia has been in the news this week. I realize that this may not be of earth shattering importance, but still, maybe it is prophetic in some way.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor.../mad80306021652

Here is a late addition, the URL to the story in La Voz de Galicia http://www.lavozdegalicia.es/inicio/notici...TO=100000050349

(There are some rather interesting comments at the tail of the article which I will not get into here. If any one cares to remark on them then the appropriate place would probably be in the political forum. Still, if you can read Spanish the viewpoint is interesting and the comments exemplify the sort of wordy, commentary enlaced method of reporting which is really fun to read.)


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This post has been edited by Herrerano on 03-Jun-2004, 05:23 PM
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greenldydragon 
Posted: 10-Jun-2004, 04:31 PM
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Oddly, I'd never heard of Galicia until looking at these posts. I find this expectially interesting since I am half hispanic, I should ask my grandma where our family farm is in spain. But, since people in Galicia speak spanish, shouldn't it be in the gaelic language thing, teach people spanish? Herrerano, you could do that. I speak some of it from school and need a refresher course before september.


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May female dragons grant you inner power
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neutralize your enemies
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May weather dragons
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May Ti'amat effect the changes you command
May Ishtar grant you Dragon Power
May Ishtar grant you Dragon Power
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Herrerano 
Posted: 10-Jun-2004, 05:46 PM
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Hi greenldydragon,

Galicia has two official languages, Spanish and Galician (Español y gallego). There is a little more info here.
http://www.celticradio.net/php/forums/inde...?showtopic=3963

It appears that Galician is more closely akin to Portuguese then Spanish.

Sí quiere practica tu español, esta bien, pero yo tambien necesito ayuda con mi gramatica. biggrin.gif

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greenldydragon 
Posted: 10-Jun-2004, 08:21 PM
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I actually understood what you just said! Okay, I haven't forgotten it all...but my computer won't allow me to write in spanish..
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Viriato 
Posted: 06-Jun-2005, 08:54 PM
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Here is a pretty good site about Galiza

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galicia_(Spain)

Even includes the National Anthem in wording and mp3 file!


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Tino, àn Gaileach

"It is better Honour without ships than ships without Honour"
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Viriato 
Posted: 06-Jun-2005, 09:10 PM
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And this one is a touristic one but quite good (In English)

http://www.galinor.es/galicia-e.html
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Viriato 
Posted: 28-Jul-2005, 10:43 AM
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This a quite good report from a couple of travellers...

http://worldandi.misto.cz/_MAIL_/article/clapr99.html
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Viriato 
Posted: 28-Jul-2005, 04:18 PM
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Not bad resume of the history of Galicia.

Actualy fails to say that the Romas did manage to conquer Galicia because the leader who was keeping them at bay -Viriato- was betrayed by his generals the same that did happen to Boudicea and later on to William Wallace. That has been the history of our race... Put down by betrayals since we couldn't be put down by fight. Very sad...

It has been stated that when the traitors went to catch they reward, all that they got was a reply by the Romans that "Rome don't pay traitors" and they were killed.

http://www.celticleague.org/history_6-05.html
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Viriato 
Posted: 28-Jul-2005, 04:32 PM
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This is even better and it talks about the betrayal of Viriato, thought not by his generals (???) but one of his relatives... Well... It is not what my history book in the school did say but, Who knows?

http://alternativemarketplace.com/cgi-bin/....pl?article=347
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Viriato 
Posted: 28-Jul-2005, 05:12 PM
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