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Jaxom 
Posted: 18-Jan-2004, 05:48 PM
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Sometimes Beef can be a little bland after cooking.

Some of the tastiest ways of adding to the flavours are the simple ones. and often to be found in your store cupboard.

Roast Beef: grind salt and Black pepper on joint before roasting, sprinkle on some marjoram. then roast as normal.

Beef casserole.or Beef Mince. Add one large Onion, one beef stock cube, made up to manufacturers guidelines, half a teaspoon of marjoram, black pepper, teaspoon of tomato puree, dash of Worcestershire sauce, half teaspoon of horseradish sauce, a little Garlic, one teaspoon of red current jam and finally one carrot grated. DO NOT ADD SALT AS OTHER ingredients WILL HAVE ENOUGH. Cook for normal time depending on if it is cooked in oven or on top of stove in pan.

If you vary the quantities slightly you will find the blend that suits you best.

all tips are mine based on years of cooking and experimenting.
Good luck and enjoy

Jack
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maggiemahone1 
Posted: 18-Jan-2004, 06:56 PM
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I like to fix beef roast in the oven. I add salt, pepper and Mrs. Dash garlic and herb seasoning and beef broth. Occasionally I add to beef broth, onion gravy mix or mushroom gravy mix. Turns out tender, juicy and most off all delicious. I hardly ever use measurements, just a dash of this and a pinch of that.

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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 19-Jan-2004, 04:16 AM
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This is what I suggest to make T-Bone Steaks or any other kind of steak you want to broil come out very tastey and tender...What I use is very simple ingredients...salt, black pepper, and Lea & Perrin's Worcestershire sauce.

First I salt and pepper the steaks, then take a fork and poke holes into the steak until I've covered the entire steak so that the salt and pepper gets inside. Then I shake about 1/3 cup of Worcestershire sauce over the steak, as I poke it with a fork again. I do the same on the other side then place into the refrigerator and let them marinate for at least 3 hours. Heat up the broiler and watch those babies sizzle! The steaks come out great! I personally, like my steak well done.

A note: From what I've learned from Chefs it is a cardinal sin to add salt to beef before you cook it. They say it draws the juices and flavor out of the meat. What they suggest is salt the meat as you are cooking it. I've even heard one chef say never salt a steak---period. In my opinion, salt adds flavor, but you decide for yourself.

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maggiemahone1 
Posted: 19-Jan-2004, 08:19 AM
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Roisin, I think that salt shrinks the meat when you first start cooking it. Salt it when you flip it to the other side. What kind of salt do you use? I use kosher or sea salt on my meat.

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Herrerano 
Posted: 19-Jan-2004, 08:56 AM
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Hmmmm, steak.

Hard to get good steaks here, but beef tenderloin only costs $2.50 a lb so that works real well.

Cut across the grain of the tenderloin to make round pieces about an inch and a half thick. Wrap in bacon and secure with a toothpick.

Have grill fired up, and charcoal real hot and close to the grill.

In a skillet, melt a stick of butter, mix in garlic (lots of garlic, can never have too much) then add a little dry red wine, and let cool. When this mixture is cool, put the beef filets in and let stand only about five minutes on each side. Too long and the meat discolors too much and the acid in the wine affects the texture and taste.

Have a beer open and a spare handy. Put the meat on the grill, control flare ups with small amount of beer, and salt meat as desired. Grill as desired, I like mine rare so they only go about five or six minutes per side, depending on the thickness. For well done, grill over really hot spot for a few minutes on both sides then move to a cooler place on the grill and leave for about fifteen minutes.

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Keltic 
Posted: 19-Jan-2004, 09:05 AM
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It made it up to -10 C (14 F) on Saturday. Canadian barbecue weather!!! Grilled t-bone steaks and didn't need any spice to make these tasty. It was -45 C (-49 F) with windchill the night before (-33C (-29.5 F) without) so as tempted as I was to fire up the barbecue on Friday, I held off.


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Herrerano 
Posted: 19-Jan-2004, 09:30 AM
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Keltic Posted on Jan 19 2004, 09:05 AM
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It was -45 C (-49 F) with windchill the night before (-33C (-29.5 F) without) so as tempted as I was to fire up the barbecue on Friday, I held off.



A problem I don't have down here, and with the addition of a roof over the barbecue area, even those heavy tropical rains don't slow things down.

Beef here is almost all range fed, with very little fat, and almost all Brahma at that, which seems to have a stronger flavor then Angus. Hence the addition of some kind of fat helps give something to drip onto the coals and help out with that good charcoaled flavor.

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Shadows 
Posted: 19-Jan-2004, 11:23 AM
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If I am cooking steaks on the grill I add different types of wood chips to the coals to impart flavor and on occasion I add a barbeque dry rub to the meat before cooking.

As for roasts there are many things to do to add flavor, my favorite is called larding. Larding is the process of making deep small cuts into the roast with the point of a knife, then adding flavor into the slits. I slice garlic and place it into these slits every 2 inches of the meat. You can stuff herbs, spices or as the name suggests lard or bacon slices as well. This places the flavoring in the meat and not just on top.

I also use deep marinading ( this is letting the meat in marinade for 24 hours at least ).


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maggiemahone1 
Posted: 20-Jan-2004, 01:34 PM
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I do like a bit of seasoning to my beef. If it doesn't have something it taste to bland. I like it kicked up a notch. Garlic kicks anything up. Can't hardly cook without a bit of garlic.

Thanks for that bit of info on larding, shadows! I have always made slits in my roast and put seasoning, just had no idea what it was called. You learn something new every day!

Do any of you folks watch the Food Network?

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Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 20-Jan-2004, 01:49 PM
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if you pan-roast your beef, add a tomato and a few onions. I like rosemary with beef as well, I work in salt, pepper and rosemary the evening before the day I will roast it and let it all draw thru..


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Shadows 
Posted: 21-Jan-2004, 10:54 PM
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I had posted this earlier in the Scottish cooking thread.
Please be sure to use the size roast recommneded and cook covered tightly ( otherwise it will tend to be a little dry ).

Recipe Name: ENGLISH ROAST BEEF
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 8

SOURCE SHADOWS

5 Pound Beef, round cut as a roast
2 Tblsp Butter
1/2 Cup Water
1/2 Tsp. sage, dry
1/2 Tsp. mint, dry
For the Gravy
1 Tblsp Butter
1 Tblsp Flour
1/2 Cup Water, cold
1/4 Tsp. sage, dry
1/4 Tsp. mint, dry
OPTIONS:
1 Whole Onion sliced
1 Clove Garlic, minced
1/8 Tsp. seasoned salt
1/8 Tsp. crushed red pepper, hot

Salt and pepper roast well. Place the butter in your pan and melt it over medium heat. Brown the roast on all sides in this butter. After browning add 1/2 cup water to the pan. Put sage and mint on the roast. Cover pan. Roast at medium heat ( 325 -350 ) for 3 hours if you like well done or 2 hours for rare. Every hour or so look to make sure there is at least 1/2 cup liquid in the pan. When done to your liking remove roast to a plate and keep warm.

GRAVY:

Melt butter in a clean frypan over medium heat. Add flour to melted butter. Stir until well mixed with the butter. Remove from heat and add 1/2 cup cold water, The water must be cold, not hot, or hte flour and butter will become lumpy. Mix until a smooth paste is formed. Place the pan back on medium heat. Add sage and mint. Now add all the liquid from the roasting pan and mix it well. Stir all the time and let it boil slowly until thickend. Remove from heat and serve over roast.

OPTIONS:

The onion , garlic, seasoned salt and crushed red pepper are added to the roast before cooking. Red wine can be used instead of water while roasting (use water only in the gravy).


*** side note : I have been told this cooks up well in a crockpot if cooked on low for 6 - 7 hours. I have not tried that yet since I like the way this turns out in my castiron dutch oven. ***
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Shadows 
Posted: 26-Mar-2004, 07:37 PM
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More tasty beef!:

Recipe Name: BRAISED SIRLOIN TIPS WITH RICE
Category: BEEF
Serves: 8

SOURCE SOUTHERN LIVING - DINNER AND SUPPER COOKBOOK with modifications by Shadows

1 1/2 Pound mushrooms, fresh, sliced
1/4 Cup butter, melted, divided
1 Tblsp olive oil
1 Slice bacon, cut into small pieces
3 Pound sirloin , cut into 1 inch cubes
3/4 Cup beef bouillon
3/4 Cup red wine
2 Tblsp soy sauce
2 Clove garlic, minced
1/2 Large onion, grated
2 Tblsp corn starch
1/3 Cup beef bouillon
1 10-3/4 oz can cream of mushroom soup, undiluted
salt, to taste
rice

Saute` mushrooms and bacon* pieces in butter until lightly browned; spoon into a casserole.
Add remaining butter and olive oil to skillet; add meat, and brown on all sides. Spoon over mushrooms.
Combine bouillon, wine, soy sauce, garlic and onion; add to skillet, scraping bottom to salvage all particles.
Blend cornstarch with bouillon; stir into wine mixture. Cook, stirring constantly, until smooth and thickened. Spoon over the meat, stirring gently to mix. Cover and bake at 275o F for 1 hour. Add mushroom soup, stirring until smooth. Add salt to taste. Bake 10 to 15 minutes more. Serve over cooked rice.

*Original recipe did not contain bacon.
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Shadows 
Posted: 03-May-2004, 02:34 PM
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I fixed this for a brunch today, yes I grill in the morning! I cook over an open fire or coals as often as I can! This is very good and came to me in a email.


Tri-Tip in Chimichurri Sauce

2 pound tri-tip roast
3/4 cup olive oil
1/2 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon Tobasco
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

In a blender combine garlic, parsley, cilantro and basil. Blend until fine. Add olive oil, rice wine vinegar, tobasco, salt and pepper. Blend until smooth. Pour half the mixture into a resealable bag and add tri-tip. Turn to coat and refrigerate for about 4 hours. Place the remaining half of the sauce in a container and refrigerate until you need it. Preheat grill. Remove tri-tip from bag and place on hot grill. Turn after 2 minutes and grill for 2 mor minutes. Turn down heat or move to a cooler part of the grill. Grill for another 4 minutes per side then continue grilling over indirect heat. Continue cooking until done, about 15 more minutes. When done, remove the tri-tip from the grill and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Meanwhile heat the remaining sauce until just warm. Cut tri-tip into thin strips and serve with sauce over top.

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Herrerano 
Posted: 23-Aug-2004, 07:15 PM
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Well, waiting tonight for folks to load a truck so I'll take a minute and write out my Pot Roast recipe here.

Needed:

About four pounds of beef suitable for pot roast. I use Lomo or Babilla (don't know how to translate those, the Babilla is cut from the loin like a big chunk of sirloin, and the lomo is, well, lomo.)

Flour
Celery
Onions
Carrots
black Pepper
Potatoes
Beef broth or beer or some kind of tastey liquid
Salt

Clean and cut Celery, onions, and carrots into pieces about a half inch long. Set aside.

In a large heavy pot (I use a large paila (a big, round bottomed, heavy pan, sort of like a wok only heavier) heat a small amount of cooking oil. Dredge the piece of beef in flour mixed with salt, celery salt, and pepper then brown in the oil. When nicely browned remove from the pan and add about a half cup of flour. If needed add enough oil to make a medium heavy paste. (This is for the roux). Stir constantly over high heat until it reaches a nice dark brown color and has a nice toasty smell. If it burns throw it out and start over. This must be stirred constantly as it heats. (Refer to cajun cooking thread for more tips on making roux)

When the roux is nice and brown add the meat back in the pan along with the vegetables prepared above. Add enough beef broth or beer or a combination of the two to fill the pan about three quarters of the way up the piece of meat. Toss in some freshly crushed peppercorns (I crush mine with a rock since this is a third world country and no one seems to have a pepper mill.) Salt to taste, cover and lower the heat.

This should cook about two to two and a half hours. Stir about every twenty minutes to keep gravy from burning. During the last thirty minutes of cooking time add the cut up potatoes and cook until tender. When done, turn off heat and leave covered about ten minutes. Then stir well scraping the stuff up stuck on the bottom of the pan. Remove meat and cut up for serving.

Eat hearty, best with some really really cold beer.

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freekenny 
Posted: 25-Aug-2004, 07:10 PM
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QUOTE (maggiemahone1 @ 20-Jan-2004, 01:34 PM)
I do like a bit of seasoning to my beef. If it doesn't have something it taste to bland. I like it kicked up a notch. Garlic kicks anything up. Can't hardly cook without a bit of garlic.

Thanks for that bit of info on larding, shadows! I have always made slits in my roast and put seasoning, just had no idea what it was called. You learn something new every day!

Do any of you folks watch the Food Network?

maggiemahone1

O'siyo maggie,
I just love Food Network..I love to watch the different festivities/festivals they visit that always include the food judging part tongue.gif Did you see the show where the main theme was pickles? All the things that were made with pickles just blew me away blow.gif Pickle/lemon cake? sad.gif Too wild!
I agree with you about the garlic..hardly a meal that I cook that excludes garlic rolleyes.gif
Well as far as making beef tasty/tastier if all else fails, one could always douse in ketchup or A-1 sauce lol.gif
~Sty-U red_bandana.gif


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