Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )



Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> Cajun And Creole Cooking, A Taste of N'Awlins (New Orleans)
Bookmark and Share
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 05-Feb-2004, 01:14 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





I want to share a New Orleans original and favorite... "Pralines". New Orleans produces more praline candies than any other city in the world.
The Praline is a confection tradition that originated in 17th-century France by the cook of The Duke of Plessis-Prasline who supposely devised the method for coating almonds with sugar. By the 18th century, recipes for the sugar-coated nuts began appearing in English cookbooks. By the 19th century, if not earlier, pralines were a New Orleans specialty, but they differed markedly from the French version. "The Picayune's Creole Cook Book" (1901) contains a recipe for pralines that resembles the candy we know by that name today. The ingredients are brown sugar, pecans, butter, water. There are also recipes for coconut pralines, in white and pink versions, as well as pralines made with almonds and peanuts. The book notes that pralines were sold by old Creole black women called "pralinieres" on the streets of the French Quarter or in schoolyards during noon recesses. **

I want to share a few traditional recipes that are still being used in New Orleans today. I just recently bought a praline at the local corner store and boy was it delicious.

Buttermilk-Pecan Pralines
(The late Virginia Hine of New Iberia was renowned for her pralines. The buttermilk provides a tang that offsets the sweetness.
This is her recipe).

1 cup buttermilk
2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
Pinch of salt
1 tablespoon butter
2 cups pecan halves
1 tablespoon vanilla extract

In a heavy pot at least 4 1/2 inches deep, mix buttermilk, sugar, baking soda and salt until sugar is dissolved. Place pot over medium heat and cook, stirring constantly, until mixture turns brown and almost reaches the soft-ball stage of 232 F., about 35 minutes. Remove pot from heat. Add butter, pecans and vanilla extract and beat until mixture is glossy and thick. Spoon onto buttered wax paper. Let cool until harden. Makes 36 small pralines.

Caramel-Pecan Pralines
(These pralines are made with a portion of caramelixed sugar, which gives them an appealing golden color and a mellow sweetness. Adapted from Bill Neal's Biscuits, Spoonbread and Sweet Potato Pie).

1 1/2 cups pecan halves
1/2 cup whole milk
1 1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon water
3 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon vanilla extract

Place pecans on a baking sheet and toast in 325 oven for 10 minutes. Set aside. In a saucepan bring milk and 1 cup sugar ta boil. Meanwhile, in a heavy saucepan, cook the 1/2 cup sugar and water, stirring occasionally, until sugar caramelizes. Remove from heat and, while stirring, add milk mixture in a slow stream. Return pan to heat and cook, stirring until the mixtue reaches 230 F. Remove from heat and beat in pecans Add butter and vanilla and beat until mixture thickens. Spoon with a tablespoon onto buttered wax paper. Let cool and harden. Makes about 24 pralines.

Brown Sugar Pecan Pralines
(Brown sugar gives these pralines an assertive flavor and a dark color. Adapted from Louise Hanchey's How We Cooked, published by the Lafayette Natural History Museum).

1 1/2 cups pecan halves
2/3 cup water
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup light brown sugar
4 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon vanilla extract

Place pecans on a baking sheet and toast in a 325 F. oven for 10 minutes. In a saucepan, bring water, sugar and pecans to a boil and cook until mixture reaches 234 F. Remove from heat and add butter and vanilla. beat until candy thichkens and looks creamy. Drop by tablespoonfuls on buttered wax paper. Cool and let harden. Makes 24 pralines.

Rich Pecan Pralines
(Because of the heavy cream and butter, these pralines are exceptionally rich, though not as sweet as some versions).

1 cup pecan halves
1 cup pecan pieces
1 cup heavy cream
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
4 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon vanilla extact

Place pecans on a baking sheet and toast in a 325 F. oven for 10 minutes. In a saucepan bring cream, sugar and pecans to a boil and cook until the mixture reaches 234 F. Remove from heat and add butter and vanilla. Beat until candy thickens. Drop by teaspoonfuls on buttered wax papers. Makes about 30 small pralines.

**All information and recipes Cited from: Dry, Stanley, "Louisiana Life Magazine" Winter2003/04. (pg 21-22).


--------------------
Roisin-Teagan

"There, in that hand, on that shoulder under that chin---all of its lightness delicately balanced and its strings skillfully bowed---it becomes a voice."---Rich Mullins

"At 18, if you have oversized aspirations, the whole world sees you as a dreamer. At 40, you get the reputation for being a visionary." ---Rich Mullins

"God gives the gifts where He finds the vessel empty enough to receive them."---C.S. Lewis

Éire go Brách!
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 12-Feb-2004, 02:10 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





Seafood Bienville

Category: Creole
Serves: 4 to 6

2 dozen oysters
1/2 lb. crabmeat
1lb. boiled shrimp
1 cup of fresh mushrooms (your favorite), chopped
5 cloves garlic, finely diced
1 large onion, chopped
1 stick of butter (about 1 cup of butter)
1 teaspoon olive oil
4 Tablespoons flour
1 cup milk
1/2 cup cream
1/2 cup chicken broth (stock)
1/4 cup sherry or white wine
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
Fresh Parmesan cheese, grated
Fresh breadcrumbs
Paprika

Ahead of time boil the shrimp in your favorite seafood boil seasoning. Remove the head, shell and tail from the shrimp. Cook the shrimp, mushrooms, garlic, onions in 1 teaspoon of olive oil until translucent and limp. Place on the side. Meanwhile, in another saucepan melt butter, stir in flour, add milk, cream, broth and wine. Stir until thickened. Add crabmeat, sauted onions, garlic, mushrooms, shrimp, and salt and white pepper, then simmer slowly for 15 minutes. Drain oysters, bake on cookie sheet at 300 F. until edges curl, drain. Chop oysters and mix with other seafoods. Place in small serving shells or ramekins and top with breadcrumbs, cheese, paprika, and broil for 3 minutes. Serve while bubbling.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 12-Feb-2004, 02:22 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





Creole Fried Oysters

Category: Hence the title
Serves: 2 to 4

1 egg beaten
3/4 tomato ketchup
2 Tbls. Worcestershire sauce
1 1/4 Hot sauce or Tabasco
1 tsp. celery salt
1/2 tsp. each black and red pepper
1 to 1 1/2 quart oysters, drained
Corn meal
Oil for deep frying

In a deep bowl mix well the egg, ketchup, Worcestershire, Tabasco, celery salt, and ground peppers. Soak oyster in this sauce for 1 hour in refrigerator. Roll oysters in corn meal and fry, uncovered, in deep hot oil.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
DraconisMajore 
Posted: 15-Feb-2004, 11:31 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Servant
**

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 41
Joined: 17-Jun-2003
ZodiacHazel

Realm: Mass

male






* Exported from MasterCook *

Vintner's Chicken

Recipe By :Submitted by Depot House at Madame Julia's, New Orleans, LA
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Chicken Main Dish
Poultry

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2 tablespoons plain flour
1/4 teaspoon basil -- crumbled
1/4 teaspoon dried tarragon -- crumbled
1/4 teaspoon paprika
4 chicken breast halves -- boned, skinned
1 tablespoon safflower oil
1 tablespoon butter
2 small garlic cloves -- minced
1/2 cup white wine (dry)
1 cup red seedless grapes -- halved
1/2 cup chicken broth
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
Salt -- to taste
Freshly-ground black pepper -- to taste
1 tablespoon chopped freshly-picked parsley -- garnish

Mix flour, basil, tarragon, paprika, salt and pepper in large bowl. Add chicken and toss gently to coat. Heat oil and butter in large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in garlic, cook only a few seconds before adding chicken. Saute on both sides until golden brown. Pour in wine. Cover and cook until chicken is done, about 5 minutes.

Add grapes, broth and lemon juice and heat through. Transfer chicken and grapes to a platter using slotted spoon. Reduce by about half. Pour over chicken, garnish with parsley and serve.

This recipe yields 4 servings.

Source:
"1st Traveler's Choice Internet Cookbook at www.virtualcities.com/ons/recipe.htm"
S(Formatted for MC6):
"11-21-2000 by Joe Comiskey - [email protected]"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 313 Calories; 20g Fat (58.4% calories from fat); 31g Protein; 1g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 101mg Cholesterol; 216mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 4 1/2 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1 1/2 Fat.

NOTES : Specialty Recipe from Depot House at Madame Julia's, New Orleans, LA
The following recipe is from Iler Pope, owner of the famous New Orleans neighborhood restaurant, Cafe Atchafalaya on Louisiana Avenue at the edge of New Orleans' Garden District. Iler is the best Southern/Creole cook in this region. She's from the Mississippi Delta region and her food is renowned for its quality, freshness & gourmet taste.

Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


--------------------
If there were no more virgins, what would dragons have for lunch then ?
PMEmail Poster               
Top
barddas 
Posted: 18-Feb-2004, 11:53 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Offical sacrifice to the guitar gods-Play til you bleed
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 2,030
Joined: 06-Nov-2002
ZodiacWillow

Realm: second star to the right, straight until morning

male





Pralines!!!!! Roisin yer trying to make me fat!!!
There was a great little place near the French Market( By the river) that had the most scrumptious pralines.....
I will have to surprise m'wife with these.. and the couple that went down to your lovely city with us...

Thank ya deary wink.gif


--------------------
BARDDAS BLOG/WEB SITE

Co Founder/Member of the KDC

Music is holy, art is sacred, and creativity is power

Everyday is EARTH DAY to a farmer

"Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much."
Oscar Wilde

Some men are drawn to oceans, they cannot breathe unless the air is scented with a salty mist. Others are drawn to land that is flat, and the air is sullen and is leaden as August. My people were drawn to mountains- Earl Hamner Jr.

PMEmail Poster                
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 20-Feb-2004, 12:47 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





QUOTE (barddas @ Feb 18 2004, 10:53 AM)
Pralines!!!!! Roisin yer trying to make me fat!!!
There was a great little place near the French Market( By the river) that had the most scrumptious pralines.....
I will have to surprise m'wife with these.. and the couple that went down to your lovely city with us...

Thank ya deary wink.gif

barddas,
Let me know how they came out. I've never made them myself, but have tried many homemade pralines before from fellow classmates in high school and other friends who sold them for extra money.

If you didn't notice when you were down here, most locals are pushing the fat scale. As for myself, with all these different tastey delights it's hard to stay on Dr. Atkins. But I'm doing it (I've lost 30 lb. so far).

Roisin
angel_not.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 05-Mar-2004, 04:57 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





Crab Gumbo
Category: Creole
Serves: 4

4 slices bacon
1 large bell pepper, chopped
1 large onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 to 2 cups sliced frozen okra
1 large can stewed tomatoes
1 can tomato puree
salt and pepper to taste
2 1/2 cups fresh crab meat and 10 crab claws
1 cup of rice
1 Tbls. cayenne pepper or chili powder
1 Tbls. file
1 bay leaf or 1/2 teaspoon crushed sweet basil
1/3 cup of fine extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup chopped parsley

Cut bacon in small pieces, onion and bell pepper in small cubes. Cook bacon until crisp adding onion and bell pepper. Simmer 15 minutes. Add okra, minced garlic, and olive oil, and cook at low temperature 30 minutes. Add tomatoes and tomato puree. Add as much water as you will need depending upon amount of gumbo desired. Usually a gumbo consistency is a bit watery like a bisque in texture. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add cayenne pepper or chili powder, file, and bay leaf or basil cooking 15 minutes more. Add crab meat and cook on med heat for 15 minutes, then add rice and do not stir around pot, just crossways. Cook at very low heat at least 2 hrs. The longer cooked, the better. Add hot sauce if you like hot seasoned gumbo. At the last 5 minutes of cooking add chopped parsley. Enjoy!!
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 05-Mar-2004, 05:30 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





Stuffed Artichokes with Crab Meat
Category:Creole (Creole and Italian fusion)
Serves: 4

1/4 lb. butter
1/2 cup chives, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 1/2 cups rich cream sauce
1/2 tsp. Tabasco
1 tsp. Lea & Perrins Worstershire
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
1 pinch freshly ground nutmeg
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 cup Italian bread crumbs
1 1/2 lbs. lump crab meat
1/2 cup freshly cooked artichoke meat, chopped
1/2 cup freshly graited parmesan cheese
1/2 lemon
fine extra virgin olive oil
4 cooked artichokes *

In browned butter, saute chives and garlic. Add cream sauce, seasonings, bread crumbs, and mix thoroughly. Add crab meat and the cooked artichoke meat (boil 1 artichoke until falling apart, remove the flower center and discard. Next take the center and ends of the tender artichoke meat and roughly chop) and cook 2 minutes. Stuff artichokes with crab meat stuffing. Broil stuffed artichokes for 4 minutes or until slightly browned on top. Next, drizzle some extra virgin olive oil over the top of each artichoke. Garnish all four artichokes lightly with the juice from the wedge of a lemon and freshly graited parmesan cheese. Serve hot. When eating, pull out a artichoke leaf with the crab stuffing and bite down with your teeth and pull while raking in the tender artichoke meat and crab meat stuffing. Enjoy!!

*note: You can steam the artichokes until tender, but not falling apart. The core should be very tender.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 07-Mar-2004, 12:53 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,169
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Here is a page from an Old Creole cookbook... the candied orange is grand!!!

Attached Image. Works with IE only! (Click thumbnail to expand)
Attached Image (Works with IE Only)


--------------------
I support the separation of church and hate!

IMAGINATION - the freest and largest nation in the world!


One can not profess to be of "GOD" and show intolerence and prejudice towards the beliefs of others.

Am fear nach gleidh na h–airm san t–sith, cha bhi iad aige ’n am a’ chogaidh.
He that keeps not his arms in time of peace will have none in time of war.

"We're all in this together , in the parking lot between faith and fear" ... O.C.M.S.

“Beasts feed; man eats; only the man of intellect knows how to eat well.”

"Without food we are nothing, without history we are lost." - SHADOWS


Is iomadh duine laghach a mhill an Creideamh.
Religion has spoiled many a good man.

The clan MacEwen
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 07-Mar-2004, 03:15 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





Very interesting Shadows. I found it curious that there were no mention of measurements in those recipes. I'll try some of them out.

Roisin angel_not.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 08-Mar-2004, 02:55 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,169
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





There were plenty of measurements in those recipes, just not what we are used to today, that cookbook dates back to circa 1800.
lol
See the link I posted in Early American Cooking ...lots more good old stuff!
PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 08-Mar-2004, 06:31 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





Oh...I see. I guess I wasn't really looking or I didn't notice them. unsure.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 15-Mar-2004, 07:28 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,169
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





Oh me Gads, this one will make you sweat going in and pucker coming out, as me grand dad used to say!

I made this one for supper tonite, It is premo, jusy be warned it is spicey!!!


Recipe Name: BLACKENED CHICKEN
Category: CAJUN
Serves: 8

16 each 3 oz skinless chicken breast
****** SEASONING MIX
2 tbsp Salt
1 1/2 tsp Garlic powder
1 1/2 tsp Ground black pepper
1 tsp White pepper
1 tsp Onion powder
1 tsp Ground cumin
1/2 tsp Gound cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp Sweet paprika
****** OTHER INGREDIENTS
3/4 Pound Melted unsalted butter

NOTE: Recipe calls for 16 (3-ounce) skinless boned chicken breasts,
about 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick, or 8 (10-ounce) bone-in leg-thigh
pieces, or a combination of these. Skin the leg-thigh pieces, then
bone each piece along the length of the two bones, leaving meat in
one piece. Trim off excess fat. Pound each breast or leg-thigh
fillet to 1/2 inch thick.

Let the chicken come to room temperature before blackening.
Thoroughly combine the seasoning mix ingredients in a small bowl.
Heat a large cast-iron skillet over very high heat until it is
extremely hot and just short of the point at which you see white ash
or a white spot forming in the skillet bottom, about 8 minutes. (the
time will vary according to the intensity of the heat source.)
Heat the serving plates in a 250F oven.
Just before cooking each piece of chicken, dip it in the melted
butter so that both sides are well coated, then sprinkle each fillet
evenly with the seasoning mix, using about a rounded 1/2 teaspoon on
each, and patting it in with your hands. (If you lay the fillet on a
plate or other surface to season it, be sure the surface is warm so
the butter won't congeal and stick to the surface instead of to the
meat. Wipe the surface clean after seasoning each fillet. Use any
remaining seasoning mix in another recipe.)
Immediately place the fillet skinned side down in the hot skillet,
making sure all meat folds are opened up and the meat is lying flat.
Pour about 1 teaspoon butter on the top of the fillet (be careful, as
the butter may flame up). If you cook more that 1 fillet at a time,
place each fillet in the skillet before buttering and seasoning
another one.
Cook uncovered over the same high heat until the underside forms a
crust, about 2 minutes. (The time will vary according to the
thickness of the fillets and the heat of the skillet or fire; watch
the meat and you'll see a white line coming up the side as it cooks.)
Turn the fillets over and pour about 1 teaspoon more melted butter on
top of each. Cook just until meat is cooked through, about 2 minutes
more. Serve the chicken fillets crustier side up while piping hot.
Clean the skillet after cooking each batch and repeat the
blackening procedure with the remaining chicken fillets.
To serve, place 2 breast fillets or 1 leg-thigh fillet on each
heated serving plate. If you use a large serving platter, do not
stack the fillets.

Paul Prudhomme warns, "Blackening should be done either outdoors or
in a commercial kitchen. The process creates an incredible amount of
smoke that will set off your own and your neighbors' smoke alarms.
People with really well-installed commercial hood vents at home have
gotten away with blackening in their own kitchens. They are
privileged! Don't push your luck."

From The Prudhomme Family Cookbook


PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Shadows 
Posted: 21-Mar-2004, 10:49 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline





Reader of souls, vision seeker, TROLL
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 4,169
Joined: 20-Jun-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: The frontier of Penn's Woods

male





This is authentic Andouille!!!

Recipe Name: ANDOUILLE-CHEF FOLSE
Category: CAJUN
Serves: 1

5 Pound Pork butt
1/2 Pound Pork fat
1/2 Cup Chopped garlic
1/4 Cup Cracked black pepper
2 Tblsp Cayenne pepper
1 Tblsp Dry thyme
4 Tblsp Salt
6 Each Feet beef middle casing (see
-butcher or
Specialty shop)


Andouille is the Cajun smoked sausage so famous
nationally today. Made with pork butt, shank and a
small amount of pork fat, this sausage is seasoned
with salt, cracked black pepper and garlic. The
andouille is then slowly smoked over pecan wood and
sugar cane. True andouille is stuffed into the beef
middle casing which makes the sausage approximately
one and a half inches in diameter. When smoked, it
becomes very dark to almost black in color. It is not
uncommon for the Cajuns to smoke andouille for seven
to eight hours at approximately 175 degrees.
Traditionally, the andouilles from France were made
from the large intestines and stomach of the pig,
seasoned heavily and smoked. In parts of Germany,
where some say andouille originated, the sausage was
made with all remaining intestines and casings pulled
through a larger casing, seasoned and smoked. It was
served thinly sliced as an hors d'oeuvre. It is
interesting to note that the finest andouille in
France comes from the Brittany and Normandy areas. It
is believed that over half of the Acadian exiles who
came to Louisiana in 1755 were originally from these
coastal regions.

Cube pork butt into one and a half
inch cubes. Using a meat grinder with four one quarter
inch holes in the grinding plate, grind pork and pork
fat. If you do not have a grinding plate this size, I
suggest hand cutting pork butt into one quarter inch
square pieces. Place ground pork in large mixing bowl
and blend in all remaining ingredients. Once well
blended, stuff meat into casings in one foot links,
using the sausage attachement on your meat grinder.
Tie both ends of the sausage securely using a heavy
gauge twine. In your homestyle smoker, smoke andouille
at 175-200 degrees F for approximately four to five
hours using pecan or hickory wood. The andouille may
then be frozen and used for seasoning gumbos, white or
red beans, pastas or grilling as an hors d'oeuvre.
Recipe by: Chef John Folse Louisiana's Premier
Products 2517 South Philippe Avenue Gonzales, LA 70737
(504) 644-6000

Recipe by: : Chef John Folse- Louisiana's Premier
Products



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -





PMEmail PosterUsers Website My Photo Album               
Top
Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 05-Apr-2004, 07:31 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



a ragamuffin of Eireann
Group Icon

Group: Ireland
Posts: 735
Joined: 25-Jul-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: South Louisiana

female





Stuffed Flounder

Category: Cajun
Serves: 4

4 small flounders
1/2 cup green onions, chopped
1/4 cup celery, diced
1 small clove garlic, minced
1 small can shrimp, drained or 1/2 cup of fresh sm. shrimp
1 small can lump crab meat with liquid or 1 cup of fresh crab meat
1/2 cup bread crumbs
Salt and pepper
Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Lemon juice
Paprika

Prepare flounder by making slit along backbone on dark side of fish; then cut a pocket by sliding knife along ribs on both sides of backbone. Mix green onions, celery, garlic, shrimp, crab meat, bread crumbs. Salt and pepper to taste. Add enough oil to moisten and stuff 1/4 of mixture into each flounder. Sprinkle with lemon juice. Rub skin with paprika, salt, and pepper. Wrap flounders individually in alumnium foil, slit side up. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes; open foil and brown 15 minutes longer. Serve with lemon butter sauce. Enjoy!
PMEmail Poster               
Top
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

 








Celtic RadioTM broadcasts through Live365.com and StreamLicensing.com which are officially licensed under SoundExchange, ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and SOCAN.
©2014 Celtic Radio Network, Highlander Radio, Celtic Moon, Celtic Dance, Ye O' Celtic Pub and Celt-Rock-Radio.
All rights and trademarks reserved. Read our Privacy Policy.
Celtic Graphics ©2014, Cari Buziak


Link to CelticRadio.net!
Link to CelticRadio.net
View Broadcast Status and Statistics!

Best Viewed With IE 8.0 (1680 x 1050 Resolution), Javascript & Cookies Enabled.


[Home] [Top]

Celtic Hearts Gallery | Celtic Mates Dating | My Celtic Friends | Celtic Music Radio | Family Heraldry | Medival Kingdom | Top Celtic Sites | Web Celt Blog | Video Celt