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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 11:45 AM
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Chicken and Sausage Gumbo
Catogory: CREOLE
Serves: 4 to 6


2-3 lbs. of Chicken
1-2 lbs. of smoked sausage (Andouille if you can find it)
3 stalks of celery, chopped
1 extra large yellow onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
3 cloves of garlic chopped fine
1 cup of green onion tops, chopped
1 cup of Italian parsley, minced
1 cup of drained diced stewed tomatos
2 cups of fresh or frozen sliced okra
5 cups of chicken stock
4 cups of water
1/4 cup of olive oil
1/2 cup of flour
1 stick of butter
2 teaspoons of salt
1/2 teaspoon of white pepper or black
1/2 teaspoon of dried Sweet Basil or Rosemary
1/2 cup of white wine (drinking wine not cooking)
1 tablespoon of Hot sauce (if you want it hotter add more)
Gumbo File

Boil chicken in a 4 qt. pot until cooked. Saute bell pepper, onion and celery in butter until tender, next add minced garlic and saute for about 1 minute then add white wine and stir until wine is reduced. Remove sauted vegtables from heat and set aside. Next make a roux with oil and flour in another 4 qt. pot. This stage is very important. On low heat brown your flour as you constantly stir. Be careful not to burn. When the roux is a nice medium (peanutbutter in color according to Herrerano) brown it is done. Then whisk in 5 cups of hot chicken stock, 4 cups of hot water, add your sauted vegtables and butter wine sauce. Next add cooked chicken, sliced sausage, stewed tomatos, salt, pepper, dried herbs, hot sauce, and okra. Your broth should have a bisque consistency. Add another cup of water if needed. Cover and bring to a boil. Stir and reduce to medium-high heat and let boil for 25 minutes. Stir often. Now add in your parsley and green onion tops and let cook for additional 5 minutes. Serve over a hot bed of cooked rice and sprinkle a litte Gumbo file over the top. Eat with a piece warm French Bread...Enjoy! biggrin.gif

Edited by Roisin Jan 8th 7:20 pm. Sorry I forgot some things.


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Shadows 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 08:17 PM
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OOOHWEEE now we talking good food!!!


Recipe Name: RED BEANS AND RICE
Category: CAJUN
Serves: 6

1/2 Pound red beans, small
1/2 Pound ham hocks or smoked ham
1 Large yellow onion, peeled and chopped
3 celery stalks, chopped
1 Tblsp parsley, chopped
1/2 green pepper, chopped
2 bay leaves
3 Large garlic cloves, crushed
1/8 Pound butter or margarine
pepper, to taste
1 1/4 Tblsp Worcestershire sauce
tabasco, to taste
salt, to taste
3 Cup white rice, cooked

Soak the beans overnight in water to cover. Drain and place in a heavy kettle. Add the ham,onion,celery,parsley, bay leaves, and garlic, and add water to the pot barely to cover contents. Bring to a boil, and then turn to simmer. Simmer uncovered for 2 hours. You may need to add a little water to keep from sticking.
After the first 2 hours of cooking, add the butter, pepper, Worcestershire, and tabasco to the pot. Cover and cook on very low heat for 1 more hour.
Serve over white rice.

I have substituted sausage ( andouille ) for the ham with good results.


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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 08:45 PM
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Shadows,

Your recipe for Red Beans and Rice is very similar to ours down here. The only things that are different are that we don't add worcestershire sauce or Bay leaf, but we do add 1 lb. of sliced chunks of smoked sausage in the last 30 min of cooking along with fresh chopped Italian parsley.

I think Emeril the famous chef puts in Bay leaf in his Red Beans and Rice, but the locals I've come across never have. I'm sure some do add the Bay leaf, but I've never seen it.

Just noting the differences and the similarites. This was going to be my next recipe after Seafood Gumbo. biggrin.gif
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Herrerano 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 08:47 PM
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Hi Roisin-Teagan, Shadows. (sheesh, I came back to edit this cause I just noticed the recipe was from Roisin,.........sorry)

I make the gumbo pretty frequently when I have okra, and the recipe is almost exactly as you have it above with one slight exception in the order of ingredients. I make the roux first, (by the way, the brown color would be a color close to peanut butter or a little darker. The darker it is the more flavorful, but DON'T burn it, and be careful. The best thing with this stuff is to carry two (2) beers to have close to the stove so you won't have to make a trip to the fridge while the roux is browning but have a spare close at hand.) Anyway, as the roux nears completion (which means that it will be almost, but not quite brown enough) (sheesh, I guess your way is less complicated after all, so just ignore this, tongue.gif ) I go on and add the onion, and vegetable stuff directly to the roux and let it finish browning with that stuff cooking inside it. It won't take too long and seems to help cut down a little on the time it takes for the roux to finish up, oh yeah, after adding the vegetables and the other ingredients, I add a beer then if more liquid is required add a little water.

Good Grief Shaddows, sorry buddy Roison, this doesn't add anything to your recipe at all and if I hadn't worked so hard to write it I would just erase it. biggrin.gif

Leo


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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 08:54 PM
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Hey Herrerano,

I read over your additions to the Gumbo recipe and you are right about the roux going first. I amended the recipe in order to cut down on time. wink.gif
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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 08:56 PM
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So I thought...?

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Herrerano 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 09:04 PM
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Gee Roison, sorry about getting you confused with Shadows good lord! rolleyes.gif

Well, as I was laboring over the keyboard with that post, I realized that in the end it probably wouldn't make much difference taste wise, but if someone has never made a roux before, it would be less of a problem in the manner you had described it since if it burns you would just lose a little flour and oil. By the way, we use olive oil as well since it has such a nice flowery aroma and taste in the roux, although it seems to make it somewhat thicker then other oils do. We also have those scotch bonnet peppers growing in the yard so if they are added its best to chop finely and add while the roux is making, only watch out for your eyes.


Ok, when ya gonna get to the gator and stuff. Bunches of caimen live up in Lake Gatun, that the canal passes through, but down here on the Pacific side we have the American Crocodile which grow quite a bit bigger and more aggresive. Fixed one in a Sauce Piquant the other year and it was really tasty.

Usually start seeing them out on the road not long after dry season starts, traveling I suppose, only never noticed what kind of luggage they carry. biggrin.gif

Leo
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Shadows 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 09:05 PM
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QUOTE (Roisin-Teagan @ Jan 8 2004, 08:45 PM)
Shadows,

Your recipe for Red Beans and Rice is very similar to ours down here. The only things that are different are that we don't add worcestershire sauce or Bay leaf, but we do add 1 lb. of sliced chunks of smoked sausage in the last 30 min of cooking along with fresh chopped Italian parsley.

I think Emeril the famous chef puts in Bay leaf in his Red Beans and Rice, but the locals I've come across never have. I'm sure some do add the Bay leaf, but I've never seen it.

Just noting the differences and the similarites. This was going to be my next recipe after Seafood Gumbo. biggrin.gif

I got that recipe from a long time resident of "Na lins" about 25 years ago, it goes over well with my family and I never had reason to question it... I know bay is a northern seasoning and have made this with "file" instead. It is good no matter how you make it. Waiting for your Seafood gumbo.. sounds good!

Herrerano, no problem! When I make a roux it is normally peanut butter brown for dark dishes and only lightly brown for lighter colored dishes.

S
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Elspeth 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 10:30 PM
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QUOTE (Shadows @ Jan 8 2004, 09:05 PM)
Waiting for your Seafood gumbo.. sounds good!


I'm waiting for you guys to cook this stuff and invite me over. biggrin.gif I'm free next Tuesday. laugh.gif


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barddas 
Posted: 09-Jan-2004, 11:06 AM
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I need to post in this forum more.... I never seem to have time on the weekends to post, when I'm at home. LOL! That's where all of my recipes are.... I will make a better effort, and Cajun is a specialty of mine... I LOVE IT!

BTW thanks Shadow for starting this forum. It's nice to have this one along with Catriona's Scottish Cooking forum.!!!! I can feel the weight gaining just thinking of all the food from both forums......


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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 09-Jan-2004, 03:22 PM
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Before I get to the Gator dishes like Gator meat balls, Fried Alligator, Barbie Gator let me first put in the Seafood Gumbo recipe. This recipe is very similar to the Chicken and Sausage Gumbo I posted earlier but with some obvious changes.

Seafood Gumbo
Catagory: Creole (but some Cajuns would argue it's a Cajun dish)
Serves: 4-6 (depending on the appetite it could only feed 2 smile.gif )

2-3 lbs. of medium shrimp or crawfish pealed and deveined
8-10 Gumbo crabs and crab claws *(see below for tips and instructions)
1 lb of oysters (optional)
1-2 lbs. of smoked sausage (Andouille if you can find it)
3 stalks of celery, chopped
1 extra large yellow onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
3 cloves of garlic chopped fine
1 cup of green onion tops, chopped
1 cup of Italian parsley, minced
1 cup of drained diced stewed tomatos
2 cups of fresh or frozen sliced okra
5 cups of chicken stock or shrimp stock
4 cups of water
1/4 cup of olive oil
1/2 cup of flour
1 stick of butter
2 teaspoons of salt
1/2 teaspoon of white pepper or black
1/2 teaspoon of dried Sweet Basil or Rosemary
1/2 cup of white wine (drinking wine not cooking)
1-2 tablespoon of Hot sauce (if you want it hotter add more)
Gumbo File

*Prep your shrimp ahead of time by cleaning and removing the heads, outer shells and deveining them. Gumbo crabs are simply cleaned crabs that have their claws removed and have been gutted and cleaned by removing the outer top shell, lungs and fat. What you will be left with is the bottom portion that contains the meat and legs. Cut these crabs in half down the middle and place in refrigerator in a bowl of Iced-water along with the crab claws and shrimp until your ready to add them to your Gumbo.

To start the Seafood Gumbo: Saute bell pepper, onion and celery in butter until tender, next add minced garlic and saute for about 1 minute then add white wine and stir until wine is reduced. Remove sauted vegtables from heat and set aside. Next make a roux with oil and flour in a 6 or 8 qt. pot (depending on how much Seafood you want to add). This stage is very important. On low heat brown your flour as you constantly stir. Be careful not to burn. When the roux is a nice medium to dark brown (peanutbutter in color according to Herrerano) it is done. Then whisk in 5 cups of hot chicken stock or shrimp stock, 4 cups of hot water, add your sauted vegtables and butter wine sauce. Next add sliced smoked sausage, stewed tomatos, salt, pepper, dried herbs, hot sauce, and okra. Your broth should have a bisque consistency. Add another 1 or 2 cups water if needed. Cover and bring to a boil. Stir and reduce to medium-high heat and let boil for 25 minutes. Stir often. Now add in your Seafood, parsley and green onion tops, bring back to rolling boil for 3 to 4 minutes, turn heat off and let stand covered for at least 30 minutes or longer. If oysters are desired, add when you turn the heat off. Serve over a hot bed of cooked rice and sprinkle a litte Gumbo file over the top. Eat with a piece warm French Bread...Enjoy!

A lot of Cajuns crack couple of raw eggs open and drop them in during the simmering stage, which is like poaching them.
Instead of using hot sauce a lot of Cajuns use "Tony Chacheres Creole Seasonings" then add hot sauce at the table if needed. You would also think "Tabasco" would be the favorite around here but it isn't. Yes you will find it in the restaraunts in New Orleans for the tourists, but most locals use "Louisiana Hot Sauce", "Louisiana Gold" (my favorite) or "Crystal Hot Sauce" in their kitchens.

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Shadows 
Posted: 10-Jan-2004, 12:05 AM
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QUOTE (barddas @ Jan 9 2004, 11:06 AM)

BTW thanks Shadow for starting this forum. It's nice to have this one along with Catriona's Scottish Cooking forum.!!!! I can feel the weight gaining just thinking of all the food from both forums......

You are most welcome and don't forget there is an Irish forum that has recipes in it also!!!

This forum was not meant to compete with those other food sources, but rather to enhance the quest for good food from around the world. I hope all of you are finding recipes that fit your tastes . Feel free to start a food topic that might not be covered here.

I have tried and enjoyed many of Cat's recipes from the Scottish forum, as well as a few of the Irish. Visit all of them friends... !!!
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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 10-Jan-2004, 08:52 AM
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Shadows,

I forgot to thank you for starting this forum. Plenty of times I've visited Catriona's Scottish food thread and have learned so much. So all you guys be sure to go over there and give a peek.

Oh Shadows, earlier what I wrote about the Red Beans recipe...I wasn't trying to disprove you wrong. Sorry. BTW: your weren't wrong and I wasn't wrong---I did some checking out of curiosity...A lot of restaraunts in the city do use the Bay leaf, but most locals don't. Go figure---it's all about personal taste. One thing though, most Master Chefs that work in the city aren't orignally from New Orleans, so I think some of our dishes here have been blended with some outside flavors. For instance, Emeril LaGassi he is from up North and his family is from Portugal, so he has added his own twist to some of our unique recipes.

But as I post these recipes, I'll try to stay true to New Orleans tradition.

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Shadows 
Posted: 10-Jan-2004, 10:25 AM
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Did not take your post as a challenge.... wink.gif Just filling you in on the source of my recipe. Looking forward to more from you... I still have a few also.
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Shadows 
Posted: 10-Jan-2004, 10:45 AM
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Recipe Name: SMOTHERED ROUND STEAK
Category: CAJUN
Serves: 4

2 Pound Round steak
2 ts Salt
1/2 ts Ground black pepper
1 ts Ground red pepper
1 ts Ground white pepper
1 as req All-purpose flour (dredging)
1/2 Cup Vegetable oil
3 each Medium onions, chopped
2 each Bell peppers, chopped
1 each Celery rib, chopped
1 Cup Beef stock or water

Alex Patout says, "Smothering is a multipurpose Cajun
technique that works wonders with everything from game
to snap beans. It's similar to what the rest of the
world knows as braising--the ingredients are briefly
browned or sauteed, then cooked with a little liquid
over a low heat for a long time." Season the roast
with one half of the salt and peppers. Dust with
flour on all sides. Heat the oil in a Dutch oven or
other large heavy pot over medium-high heat, add the
steak, and brown well on all sides. Remove the meat
and pour off all but 1 teaspoon of the oil. Add half
the onions, bell peppers, celery, and the other half
of the seasonings, and the stock or water. Stir well
and reduce the heat to the lowest possible point.
Return the roast to the pot and cover with the
remaining vegetables. Cover and let cook until the
meat is very tender, about 1 hour and 15 minutes.
Serve the meat in slices, with rice alongside and the
gravy over all.
When you try this recipe with other kinds of meat, be
sure to adjust the cooking times accordingly--let
tenderness be your guide. For extra flavorful roasts,
try larding with slivers of garlic before smothering.
Serves 4-6
From Alex Patout's "Cajun Home Cooking" Random House
Inc. ISBN 0-394-54725-X

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