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> Native American Foods, From the Alutes to the Zuni, put it here
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Shadows 
Posted: 05-Jul-2004, 02:31 PM
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QUOTE (Camchak @ 05-Jul-2004, 10:59 AM)
Camp Side Stew


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Offered by Bill Weatherman

~ Choctaw - My Grandfather told me he was also from Arkansas. ~


... my father taught me on one of many camping trips we made


I would like to see this recipe in the Camping, survival topic area.

I do not question the integrity of the native american this came from, but I do question the use of foil. I am trying to keep this section to cooking methods used by the Native Americans prior to taking on the whitemans convienences.



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Kamchak 
Posted: 05-Jul-2004, 05:01 PM
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You are most welcome to move this to the thread of your liking. smile.gif


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Shadows 
Posted: 06-Jul-2004, 07:29 AM
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Yellowjacket soup

Although the mention of "yellowjacket soup" immediately raises an
eyebrow on those unaccustomed to such a food, it was actually a delicacy
and should not be criticized until tried. Only the bravest dare venture
into the preparation of this exotic Eastern Woodland Indian food.

Secure an entire nest of ground-dwelling jellowjackets when it is full
of grubs. Loosen all the uncovered grubs by heating and remove them.
Heat the nest with the remaining grubs over a fire until the thin
paper-like covering parches. Pick out the yellowjackets and brown them
over a fire. Cook the browned yellowjackets in boiling water to make
soup and season to taste.
Good luck and good eating!!
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Shadows 
Posted: 06-Jul-2004, 07:32 PM
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QUOTE (Camchak @ 05-Jul-2004, 05:01 PM)
You are most welcome to move this to the thread of your liking. smile.gif

I will leave it here, but I think you should post it in the other topic as well.
Sometimes folks don't look in all the topics and miss what they might be looking for... this would be one example of that. This topic is not visited as much as some of the others.
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freekenny 
Posted: 16-Jul-2004, 03:08 AM
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It is sometimes difficult to have recipes that aren't 'customized' to our kitchens and allow us to use readily convenient items and ingredients without the worry of someone claiming they aren't authentic NativeAmerican dishes...well, here is one that my Papa Bluefeather and Nana as well as myself make:

Cherokee Bean Balls
Serves: 6
2 cups brown beans
4 cups cornmeal
1/2 cup flour
1 teaspoon soda
Boil beans in plain water until tender. Put cornmeal, flour and soda in large mixing bowl. Mix well. Add boiling beans and some of the juice to the cornmeal mixture to form a stiff dough. Roll in balls and drop in pot of boiling hot water. Let cook for 30 minutes at slow boil.


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Shadows 
Posted: 16-Jul-2004, 10:28 PM
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QUOTE (freekenny @ 16-Jul-2004, 03:08 AM)
It is sometimes difficult to have recipes that aren't 'customized' to our kitchens and allow us to use readily convenient items and ingredients without the worry of someone claiming they aren't authentic NativeAmerican dishes...well, here is one that my Papa Bluefeather and Nana as well as myself make:


The authenticity is not a question... it is the vessels used to cook that made me question the one post... show me a native equalivalant to aluminum foil in the 18th, 19th, or even early 20th centuries ... the type food mentioned would not be good cooked in mud. I am trying to keep this section as pure to traditon as it can be... heat sources and cooking pots of today can be used, but foil was my question. The author of that recipe had no problems with posting it else where and I did leave it here also. I only ask that tradition be looked at and considered when posting to this topic area.
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Kamchak 
Posted: 16-Jul-2004, 11:06 PM
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OK, so lets say they layed it on tree bark and wrapped it with a leaf. The ground beef might be our next problem so we can change that to shredded beef or thinly sliced with a sharp rock. I'm not real sure if Native Americans used salt and pepper at that period in time.
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Shadows 
Posted: 17-Jul-2004, 01:05 AM
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salt was a commodity that was has been used since the beginning of mans history, it was often the reason for the placement of settlements, but let us not make light of methods of cooking... if you have reason to believe that bark and leaves were used then document it.
I am a living historian that believes that methods and practices should be documentable if calling them accurate; as I said before.... I can allow for modern heat sources and some vessels, but foil is not Native nor historic. Work with me not against me.
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Kamchak 
Posted: 17-Jul-2004, 07:31 AM
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Ooh aye sairrr keptin!
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freekenny 
Posted: 18-Jul-2004, 12:33 AM
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O'siyo,
I have made this several times and it always 'hits' the spot ~smile~ Tasty when served with corn sticks!

Cheese and Green Chili Soup
2 tbs. butter
2 onions, diced
4 cloves fresh garlic, chopped
15 freshly roasted green chilies. You may use 1 large can (28 ounces) roasted diced green chilies if roasting your own is not an option
5 ripe tomatoes, diced
6 medium white potatoes, peeled and cut into 1" cubes
16 cups water
2 pounds Longhorn Colby or Cheddar cheese, shredded
Salt to taste
In a large soup pot, melt butter and saut? onions and garlic over medium heat. When onions are soft, add green chilies and tomatoes. Simmer 10 minutes, stirring every minute or so.
Add potatoes and water. Cook over medium heat until potatoes are done, 10 to 20 minutes.

Add cheese. On very low heat, simmer about 30 minutes.

Add salt to taste.

For best results, allow to cool overnight and serve the next day.

Makes 6 servings.


Recipe used can be found at:
http://waltonfeed.com/peoples/navajo/
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Jul-2004, 09:48 AM
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That sounds really good!
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freekenny 
Posted: 19-Aug-2004, 10:32 PM
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O'siyo,
This is really yummy!~ eat.gif

~Butternut Squash stuffed with apples and sausage~
2 (1 lbs) butternut squash, halved and seeded
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
8 ounces fresh bulk sausage
2 apples, peeled and cubed into 1/4 inch cubes
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup chopped pecans
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground sage
salt and pepper
1 tablespoon butter, cut into bits
1 tablespoon brown sugar

~1. Preheat oven to 375.
2. Lightly oil baking dish.
3. Half squash lengthwise and remove seeds.
4. Arrange squash cut side up on the baking dish.
5. Brush lightly with oil and cover.
6. Bake until almost tender, 30-40 min.
7. Keep the oven on.
8. Meanwhile, crumble the sausage into a skillet and cook over medium heat until no longer pink.
9. Add apple.
10. Cook, stiring until crisp-tender.
11. Let cool slightly.
12. Scoop out the squash, leaving 3/8 inch thick shells.
13. Lightly mix the squash pulp into the sausage mixture breaking up squash as little as possible.
14. Mix the butter, brown sugar,pecans, sage, salt and pepper.
15. Pile the stuffing into the squash halves.
16. Dot with bits of butter and brown sugar.
17. Bake uncovered until piping hot and brown and crusty on top, 20-25 min.
18. Let cool for several minutes before serving
~~ENJOY!
Sty-U red_bandana.gif
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freekenny 
Posted: 10-Nov-2004, 02:28 PM
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O'siyo,
~ Here is a recipe from the Alogonquin tongue.gif

Algonquin Wild Nut Soup

~24 ounces hazelnuts, crushed
~6 shallots, with tops
~3 tablespoons parsley, chopped
~6 cups stock
~1 teaspoon salt
~1/4 teaspoon black pepper
~1. Place all ingredients in a large soup pot& simmer slowly over a medium heat for 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally.

~Sty-U & happy eatin' red_bandana.gif
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freekenny 
Posted: 10-Nov-2004, 02:36 PM
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O'siyo,
~ As you can tell I just love soups in the fall and winter so here is another soup from the Cherokee~ wink.gif

~Cherokee Pepperpot Soup~
1 lb short rib of beef
2 quarts water
2 large onions, quartered
3 ripe tomatoes, peeled and chopped in large chunks
1 large sweet bell pepper, seeded and diced
1 large turnip, peeled and cubed
1/2 cup potatoes, diced
1/2 cup carrots, sliced
1/2 cup corn kernels
1/4 cup celery, minced
salt & freshly ground black pepper

8-10 servings

1. Put meat in a large soup kettle and cover with water until it is about 1 inch higher than the meat.
2. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat.
3. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 1/2 hours.
4. Remove meat, let cool.
5. Discard bones, returning meat to pot.
6. Put in all vegetables, cover and simmer for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
7. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
~~Sty-U red_bandana.gif
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Shadows 
Posted: 15-Jan-2005, 12:27 AM
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This has been adapted to modern kitchen.

Recipe Name: CRANBERRY-PUMPKIN CAKE
Category: CAKES
Serves: 12

SOURCE 3 SISTERS COOKBOOK

1/2 cup chopped walnuts
3 tables brown sugar
1 1/2 tables toasted wheat germ
1/4 teaspo pumpkin-pie spice
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup toasted wheat germ
2 teaspo baking powder
1 teaspo pumpkin-pie spice
3/4 teaspo salt
1/4 teaspo baking soda
1 cup plain fat-free yogurt
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
2 tables vegetable oil
1 large egg
1/2 cup sweetened dried cranberries (example: Craisins)
1 teaspo grated orange rind
cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. combine first 4 ingredients in a small bowl; stir and set aside. Combine flours and the next 5 ingredients in a medium bowl; make a well in center of mixture. Combine yogurt, pumpkin, 1/2 cup brown sugar, oil and egg; stir well with a whisk. Add to flour mixture, stirring just until moist. Fold in cranberries and orange rind. Spoon batter into a 13x9 inch cake pan coated with cooking spray. Sprinkle with walnut mixture. Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

Yield: 12 servings
Nutrition per serving: calories 210, percent calories from fat 28% (6.6 g.), sodium 199 mg.,cholesterol 19 mg.
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