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> Native American Foods, From the Alutes to the Zuni, put it here
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Shadows 
Posted: 17-Dec-2003, 09:54 PM
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I will start with this one:

Recipe Name: WAS-NAH CORN AND CHERRY SNACK
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 6

SOURCE FRUGAL GORMET - modified by SHADOWS

2 cups cornmeal
1 cup seeded Bing cherries **
1/2 pound soft butter
2 cups brown sugar

Place the cornmeal on a cookie sheet and toast in a 325° oven until it begins to brown. Careful - this will not take long.
Drain the cherries well and chop coarsely. Mix all ingredients together well and chill in refrigerator. To serve, simply dish out by the tablespoonful. It is eaten like candy.


** Options:
Use dried fruit, cranberries, walnuts, raisins, or fresh fruit in place of the cherries if desired.


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Richard Bercot 
Posted: 17-Dec-2003, 10:22 PM
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The one I would like to submit is called Three Sisters Stew.

This is taken from "Food Fit For a Chief - Favorite Recipes of the Family of Chief Tukemas/Hawk Pope"

1 1/2 lb. cubed stewing beef ( buffalo or venison is better when available)
2 cups fresh corn (or 1 lb. can)
2 cups lima or green beans (or 1 lb. can)
2 cups butternut squash (peeled and diced)
1 medium onion
1/2 cup flour
2Tbsp. butter
3 cups water
beef bouillon flavoring to taste
salt and pepper to taste

Coat meat with flour. Melt butter in a large stew pot on medium heat. Place coated meat in melted butter, stirring frequently to sear. Do on all sides. Add onions and water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer on low heat for 20 minutes, or until meat is tender. Add the corn, beans and squash. Return to boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes or until vegetables are done, but not mushy.
(Serves 6-8)


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Shadows 
Posted: 17-Dec-2003, 10:48 PM
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This also is of the Three Sisters:


Squash and Corn with Tomatoes

1 ½ tablespoons unsalted butter
¾ pound zucchini cut into ½ inch slices
1 ¼ pounds summer squash cut into ½ inch slices
¾ pound corn kernels (thawed if frozen)
1 ¼ pounds tomatoes, seeded and chopped
3 ounces canned green chilies, drained and thinly sliced
1 ½ tablespoons minced cilantro or parsley

Melt butter in a heavy nonstick skillet over medium heat. Sauté zucchini, summer squash and corn 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, chilies and pepper to taste. Cover skillet and simmer 5-6 minutes or until zucchini is tender. Remove from heat. Stir in cilantro and serve.



Yield: 6 servings


Many more can be found at :

[url] http://oneida-nation.net/FRAMESfood.html[/url]


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RavenWing 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 10:29 AM
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I'm surprised yellowjacket soup hasn't been posted yet wink.gif


I will have to ask my mother-in-law for some recipes.



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barddas 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 10:33 AM
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Great TOPIC!!!! I have several Native American recipes at home. I will have to post them!
MMMmmm fry bread!


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myriad 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 10:36 AM
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Here are a couple of wonderful Cherokee recipe's. Rather than type them out, I have copied and pasted from the Cherokee Nation website:

http://www.cherokee.org

Yummmmm! I love Kanuchi
Kanuchi

Kanuchi is considered to be a real delicacy. The nuts are gathered in the fall and allowed to dry for a few weeks before the kanuchi making begins. It is a simple process, but that does not necessarily mean that is easy. The hickory nuts are cracked and the largest pieces of shell removed either by shaking the pieces through a loosely woven basket, or picking them out by hand.

Traditionally, a log was hollowed out on one end into a bowl like shape. The shelled hickory nuts are placed in the hollowed log and pounded with a long heavy stick with the end rounded to have the same contour, more or less, as the cavity in the log. The nuts are pounded until they are of a consistency that can be formed into a ball that will hold its shape. Kanuchi balls are usually about three inches in diameter and must be stored in a cold place. Today kanuchi is usually preserved by freezing.

To prepare kanuchi for the table, place a kanuchi ball in a saucepan with about a quart of water and bring it to a boil to dissolve the ball. Allow the kanuchi to simmer about ten minutes and then poor it through a fine sieve. (A colander lined with cheese cloth works very well for this.) All the remaining shells are left in the sieve. If you have the time and patience you can pick the larger bits of nut meat from the shells in the sieve and add them to the liquid kanuchi. The kanuchi should be about as thick as light cream. Most traditional cooks will add about two cups of homemade hominy to a quart of kanuchi. Some cooks prefer hominy grits, which are prepared according to package directions and added to the kanuchi. Others add cooked rice. Such things as consistency and how much hominy or hominy grits to add are, of course a matter of taste, as is the addition of salt or sugar.

Serve kanuchi hot as soup.

The John Howard Payne papers, a document from 1835 where elders were interviewed for their knowledge, states that a thick drink was made from hickory nuts which had been pounded, but it was made with cold water and allowed to thicken without the addition of hominy or rice.
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myriad 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 10:39 AM
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My mom has made these with possom grapes... yumieee.
Again, this is copied from the Cherokee Nation website at

http://www.cherokee.org/

Grape Dumplings

* Grape Dumplings 1 cup flour
* 1 ½ tsp baking powder
* 2 tsp sugar
* ¼ tsp salt
* 1 tbsp shortening
* ½ cup grape juice

Mix flour, baking powder, sugar, salt and shortening. Add juice and mix into stiff dough. Roll dough very thin on floured board and cut into strips ½" wide (or roll dough in hands and break off pea-sized bits). Drop into boiling grape juice and cook for 10 - 12 minutes.


Some Cherokee cooks continue to make their grape dumplings by gathering and cooking wild grapes, or 'possum grapes' instead of grape juice.

The John Howard Payne Papers, a document from 1835 where the elders were interviewed for their knowledge of the old ways, tells us that around 1800, a grape dessert was made from boiling the grapes and mashing them and then adding corn meal to make a thick consistency. This seems to be the origin of what has been enjoyed for the last one hundred years or so as "Grape Dumplings."
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 12:44 PM
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Berry Soup, Sioux
Ingredients:

1 1/2 lb Chuck steak, 1" thick, boned and trimed of excess fat (or optional buffalo)
3 tbs Peanut oil
1 Medium white onion, peeled and sliced
2 cups Beef stock
1 cup Fresh blackberries
1 tbs Light honey
Salt to taste

Instructions:
Broil or grill the meat until browned on both sides, allow to cool. In a Dutch oven, heat the oil and brown the onions. Cut the meat into bite-sized pieces and add to the pot. Add the blackberries and
enough beef stock to barely cover the meat. Stir in the honey and simmer the meat, covered, until
it is very tender, about 1 hour. If the berries are too tart, add honey to taste, add salt and serve in bowls.
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 05:08 PM
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Yonka Pins - Water Lily Roots

The yonka pin is the root of the water lily. It is rich in B vitamins and protein. They are gathered in late autumn. Find where the flower was, with its seed pod on a stem. The roots will go out from the main stem. Along the root there will be a clump about the size of a small potato. This is what you will gather

Scrap the roots clean as you would carrots. Cut it into thick slices. Cook in boiling meat and broth until tender.

These can also be strung on a heavy cord to hang and allow to dry. The taste is a little like beans.
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 05:20 PM
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Apache Acorn Soup

Source The COHT Cookbook, submitted by Clyde B.

* 3 lb Stew beef or jerky to equal fresh meat.
* 2 qt Water
* 1 tsp Pepper
* 1 tsp Salt
* 1 cup Ground acorn meal

Cover beef with water and bring to boil in a heavy pot. Simmer until done; add salt and pepper as meat cooks tender. Remove beef and chop on a flat stone until split in shreds. The meat broth continues to cook vigorously while meat and acorn flour (meal) are mixed together. Apaches stress that their food is always well done; no instant cooking. Broth, meat and meal simmer together until the broth bubbles creamy white with yellow flecks, pleasantly acorn scented and flavored.
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RavenWing 
Posted: 19-Dec-2003, 09:12 AM
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QUOTE (myriad @ Dec 18 2003, 03:39 PM)
Some Cherokee cooks continue to make their grape dumplings by gathering and cooking wild grapes, or 'possum grapes' instead of grape juice.

Some of you may know of these as "muscadines"
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myriad 
Posted: 19-Dec-2003, 04:37 PM
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wink.gif Thank you RavenWing.
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Shadows 
Posted: 05-Jul-2004, 10:16 AM
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Recipe Name: CHEROKEE PEPPER POT SOUP (AI)
Category: SOUPS/STEWS
Serves: 1

1 Pound Venison or beef short ribs
Or shanks
2 Quart Water
2 lg Onions, quartered
2 Each Ripe tomatoes, seeded and
Diced
1 lg Sweet bell pepper, seeded
And diced
1 Cup Fresh or frozen okra
1/2 Cup Diced potatoes
1/2 Cup Sliced carrots
1/2 Cup Fresh or frozen corn dried corn (rehydrated can be used )
Kernels
1/4 Cup Chopped celery
Each Salt and ground pepper to
Taste

Put meat, water, and onions in a heavy soup kettle. Cover and bring
to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 3 hours.
Remove meat, let cool, and discard bones, returning meat to pot. Stir
in remaining vegetables and simmer, partially covered for 1 1/2
hours. Season with salt and pepper. Serves 4 to 6.

SOURCE: "Spirit Of The Harvest, North American Indian Cooking" by
Beverly Cox and Martin Jacobs

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Kamchak 
Posted: 05-Jul-2004, 10:53 AM
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APACHE

FRY BREAD

5 lbs. of flour

1 ½ cups of dry powdered milk

2 T. of baking powder

1 T. salt

Add enough water until flour mixture is all mixed, is soft, and will form into a firm ball. Knead very well and form into large egg size balls. Cover and let stand for 20 minutes. Take one ball of dough and flatten between your hands. Pull and stretch, keeping as round as possible. Flip from hand to hand until dough is about 1/4 inch thick. Cook both sides in hot oil until puffy and golden brown. Lift from pan allowing excess oil to drip into pan. Lay on paper towel in a dish until ready to serve. Best when served hot. They can be filled with meat and salsa as tacos or with honey or powdered sugar for dessert.


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Kamchak 
Posted: 05-Jul-2004, 10:59 AM
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Camp Side Stew


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Offered by Bill Weatherman

~ Choctaw - My Grandfather told me he was also from Arkansas. ~


... my father taught me on one of many camping trips we made

Ingredients:
1 lb. Ground red meat (I prefer ground beef)
1 - 2 onions or many green onions
Salt & pepper
2 - 3 potatoes
1 - 2 carrots

Preparation:


Of the 1 lb. Of meat get a handful ( approx. 1/4 to 1/3 lb.) Put it on a sheet of aluminum foil ( approx. 14 in long)
Lightly salt it and pepper it.
Add chopped potatoes thin slices of carrot to both sides of the meat pepper it add onion chopped up wrap it all up in the aluminum foil (making sure it is sealed good)

Note: wrapped just the one time will work if you are oven baking it. (350 degrees for 35-45 minutes) but at campsite wrap one more time in aluminum foil and toss into the campfires edge. moving it every once in a while to cook all the way through. about 30- 60 minutes depending on fire size and size of meal.


Servings: Three - Four



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