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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 08:10 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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Recipe Name: GREEN PLATE SPECIAL -- JERKY STEW
Category: SOUP
Serves: 4

SOURCE MARY BELL'S COMPLETE DEHYDRATOR COOKBOOK.

4 Cup water
1 Cup dried tomato pieces (about 20 slices)
1 Cup beef jerky pieces (in 1/2-inch chunks)
1 Cup dried peeled potato slices
1 Tblsp dried bell pepper pieces
1 Tblsp dried onion pieces
1/2 Tsp. dried basil
1/2 Tsp. dried oregano
1/2 Tsp. dried garlic
salt and pepper to taste
1 fresh carrot, sliced (optional)
1 Cup cooked and dried short-grain rice

In a large saucepan, combine 3 cups of the water and all ingredients except carrot and rice. Let sit for 30 minutes to rehydrate.

Place pan over medium heat and bring to a boil. Add carrot, if using. Simmer for 30 minutes to an hour, until jerky is tender. Meanwhile, combine rice with remaining water and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover, and let sit for 15 minutes to rehydrate. Return to boil, partially cover and simmer until rice is tender, about 15 to 30 minutes.

Serve hot stew over cooked rice. Serves 2 to 4, depending on how far you hiked.


--------------------
I support the separation of church and hate!

IMAGINATION - the freest and largest nation in the world!


One can not profess to be of "GOD" and show intolerence and prejudice towards the beliefs of others.

Am fear nach gleidh na h–airm san t–sith, cha bhi iad aige ’n am a’ chogaidh.
He that keeps not his arms in time of peace will have none in time of war.

"We're all in this together , in the parking lot between faith and fear" ... O.C.M.S.

“Beasts feed; man eats; only the man of intellect knows how to eat well.”

"Without food we are nothing, without history we are lost." - SHADOWS


Is iomadh duine laghach a mhill an Creideamh.
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MacErca 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 12:27 PM
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this recipe is great for backpacking, mix all the ingrediants before you leave then mix with the water at campsite.


Bannock Bread

6 Cups of flour
1 Cup of lard
3 Tablespoons of baking powder
1 Tablespoon of salt
2 Cups of currants or raisins
3 ˝ Cups of water
You?ll also need a medium sized mixing bowl.
In the bowl, mix the flour and lard together by hand. Then add the baking powder, salt and the currants or raisins. Once this is done, add water and work ingredients into a dough.
This can be cooked in the camp fire in a covered dutch oven or in a conventional oven, I have done both, and both work well.
If you are going to cook it in or over the camp fire, divide the dough into four portions and firmly wrap each lump around the end of a green four foot stick and prop securely over the fire until golden brown or place dough in a greased dutch oven, and bury it in the coals for about 30 minutes or soor until golden brown.
To cook in an oven, spread the dough out into a 16" square cake ir jelly roll pan. Bake at 425 degrees for about 20 minutes or until golden brown.
this recipe is from
Julie Spotted Eagle Horse Cooper



--------------------
"Cuimhnich air na daoine o'n d'thaining thu"
Remember the men from whom you are descended.


I am Wolf.
It is my cry you hear in the night,
My eyes that gaze at you from the shadows.
It is my heart that beats in your Soul,
My strength that makes you whole.
I am Wolf. I am in you.
You are in Me. We Are Wolf.
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Shadows 
Posted: 15-Dec-2003, 09:56 AM
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ZodiacHolly

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Recipe Name: THE ULTIMATE TRAIL MIX
Category: APPETIZER
Serves: 6

SOURCE MARY BELL'S COMPLETE DEHYDRATOR COOKBOOK

2 Cup jerky, cut in 1/2-inch pieces
2 Cup salted beer nuts
1 Cup dried sweet or dill pickle, cut in 1/4-inch pieces
1 Cup salted sunflower seeds
1 Cup pumpkin seeds
1 Cup dried shredded coconut
1/4 Cup sesame seeds (optional)


What more could you want--jerky, beer nuts and pickles? This combination was a unanimous hit. Sweet and/or dill pickles are cut into small (1/4 - 1/2-inch) pieces and dried until chewy. Ground meat jerky is my first choice for this recipe because it's easier to chew. Vary the ingredients depending on your personal preferences.



Mix together all ingredients. For short-term storage, use sealable plastic bags. For long-term storage, place in refrigerator or freezer.

Makes 6 cups.
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 12:57 PM
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This one is more for a camp that you can carry alot of gear into:

Recipe Name: BACON - SPINICH PIE
Category: DUTCHOVEN
Serves: 8

SOURCE DUTCH OVEN COOKING - THIRD EDITION - JOHN G. RAGSDALE

1 9-inch pie crust
1/2 Pound bacon
1 Cup cheese , grated
1 10-oz pkg or 1 can spinich , drained
1/2 Cup cracker crumbs
3 eggs
1 1/2 Cup milk

Prepare pie crust, bake for 5 minutes and set aside. Cook bacon until crisp; drain and crumble. Mix bacon, cheese, spinach, and cracker crumbs. Beat eggs; combine with milk, and add to mixed imgredients. Pour mixture into pie crust.

Bake pie 50 to 60 minutes in dutch oven. Remove pie from oven and allow to cool 15 minutes.
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 05:14 PM
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QUICK SPINACH

Make this recipe with spinach or chickweed or lamb's lettuce or lamb's quarters or nettles, all can be found growing wild. With spinach wash and shake off as much water as posslble because a great deal of water will come out of the spinach itself during cooking. Do not cut the spinach. With the other plants, add a half cup of water after washing, and again, do not cut the leaves. After cooking, the dish can be kept in pot or pan for a few minutes. It will retain its green colour and flavour. If you dislike "spinach", you will enjoy a new, favourful taste.
This recipe is not so much a take along meal but one that can be made from forage.

· 1 full tsp salt
· 3 tbsps oil or
· 2 heaping tbsps lard


1. Heat oil or lard in skillet until hot.
2. Add spinach or other greens and salt,
3. Stir and turn for 3 minutes and it is done.
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 05:25 PM
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Wilderness Sandwich

Not sure when but it came to the great lakes area with the Swedes and Fins.

Take and fry a large pancake in a generous amount of bacon grease. Remove from the pan and cover the top with a generous amount of raw sugar. Break up pieces of cooked bacon and sprinkle over the sugar. Roll up in a tight roll and tie up the roll with a piece of cloth or leather. Then wrap the pancake tightly in paper, leather, or cloth and bind securely. Put in your pocket or pack.

The sugar gives you energy. The grease the pancake was cooked in and the bacon satisfies the craving for grease that all folks have that exercise a great deal. The pancake itself gives you proteins to keep up your general strength.

You can go twice as far on one of these sandwiches than on three chocolate bars.

SOURCE: Herter's Bull Cook and Authentic Recipes and Practices
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greenldydragon 
Posted: 28-Jun-2004, 04:03 PM
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Hmmmm...

This post has been edited by greenldydragon on 28-Jun-2004, 06:56 PM


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May dragons bring you wealth
and guard your treasures
May they banish darkness and enlighten you
May female dragons grant you inner power
May the Dragon Queen
neutralize your enemies
May Dragon Spirits
give you power over Elementals
May weather dragons
bring rain at your request
May Ti'amat effect the changes you command
May Ishtar grant you Dragon Power
May Ishtar grant you Dragon Power
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Shadows 
Posted: 28-Jun-2004, 04:11 PM
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Yonka Pins - Water Lily Roots

The yonka pin is the root of the water lily. It is rich in B vitamins and protein. They are gathered in late autumn. Find where the flower was, with its seed pod on a stem. The roots will go out from the main stem. Along the root there will be a clump about the size of a small potato. This is what you will gather

Scrap the roots clean as you would carrots. Cut it into thick slices. Cook in boiling meat and broth until tender.

These can also be strung on a heavy cord to hang and allow to dry. The taste is a little like beans.
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Kamchak 
Posted: 04-Jul-2004, 03:07 PM
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Bayouside Catfish

2 Catfish Fillets 1/4" to 1/2" thick
4 Slices Potatoe 1/4" thick
4 Slices Onion 1/4" thick
1 Sprinkle of seasonings (Cajun or Creole Seasoning)or Salt and pepper to your taste
Place all ingredients in foil bag or wrap in heavy duty aluminum foil and seal air tight. Place over hot coals and cook for 5-7 minutes (foil will puff up like the old Jiffy Pop popcorn). Take off coals and let sit off heat for 10 minutes.
Unwrap and enjoy!


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Kamchak 
Posted: 08-Jul-2004, 08:14 PM
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I am posting this here per special request. cool.gif

Camp Side Stew


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Offered by Bill Weatherman

~ Choctaw - My Grandfather told me he was also from Arkansas. ~


... my father taught me on one of many camping trips we made

Ingredients:
1 lb. Ground red meat (I prefer ground beef)
1 - 2 onions or many green onions
Salt & pepper
2 - 3 potatoes
1 - 2 carrots

Preparation:


Of the 1 lb. Of meat get a handful ( approx. 1/4 to 1/3 lb.) Put it on a sheet of aluminum foil ( approx. 14 in long)
Lightly salt it and pepper it.
Add chopped potatoes thin slices of carrot to both sides of the meat pepper it add onion chopped up wrap it all up in the aluminum foil (making sure it is sealed good)

Note: wrapped just the one time will work if you are oven baking it. (350 degrees for 35-45 minutes) but at campsite wrap one more time in aluminum foil and toss into the campfires edge. moving it every once in a while to cook all the way through. about 30- 60 minutes depending on fire size and size of meal.


Servings: Three - Four

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maisky 
Posted: 11-Jul-2004, 05:57 AM
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The early fur trappers in the Rockies tended to live on rabbit, venison and trout, besides whatever beans and such they packed in. The need for fat in their diet led to the rule of thumb: once a month eat a beaver. The high fat content of the beaver met the fat requirement nicely.


--------------------
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe."
Carl Sagan
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Shadows 
Posted: 11-Jul-2004, 10:11 AM
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This recipe was given to me by a good friend and fellow Celt. It is one of the best sources of fat and protein on the trail.


Recipe Name: PEMMICAN
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 1

SOURCE SWANNY

1 part bison (buffalo) burger
1 part fat. Bison or game fat is best
pork lard from the store is o.k.

Pemmican is historically authentic for those portraying "Nor'westers" after the year 1786 or so. Apparently Peter Pond discovered it while exploring the brand new Athabasca region of Canada. Maybe not, but in any event it's a grea.... well, it's a reasonably concentrated source of protein and fat. Here's how I make mine.


Brown the bison burger pretty crisp, and crumble it up. Pour the fat into a small dish of water an allow it cool so you can salvage the tallow. Dry the meat crumbs bone dry in your dehydrator or home oven.

Melt down your critter fat, including the bison tallow.

Mix the dried meat and fat in a ration of roughly 50/50. If you prefer, you can add some dried berries for flavor.

Pemmican isn't all that tasty, but it is a good source of protein and fats which are very valuable on the winter trail. If you're starving you can eat it raw, but it's better if used as an ingredient in soups or stews (rubaboo) or fried (micheaux??)
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Shadows 
Posted: 17-Jul-2004, 10:40 PM
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Dutch Oven Beans


Ingredients
4 cups dried pinto beans
4 cups minced yellow onions, plus 1-1/2 cups diced
1/2 cup pure chili powder
1/4 cup kosher salt
1/2 bunch fresh cilantro, stemmed and chopped
4 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups diced red bell peppers
2 cups diced green bell peppers


Preparation
Wash the beans and sort through them to remove any foreign particles or broken beans. In a stockpot, cover the beans with cold water by 6 inches and soak them for 6 hours or overnight. Be sure the beans remain covered with water during the soaking process. Drain the beans and return them to the same pan. Cover them with fresh water by 1-1/2 inches. Add the minced onions, chili powder, salt, and cilantro. Stir to blend. Bring the beans to a boil over medium heat. Reduce the heat, cover, and cook until the beans are tender, about 2-1/2 hours. From time to time, check and stir the beans, adding water if needed. Near the end of the cooking time, the liquid should be almost absorbed. Close to serving time, heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan. When the oil is very hot, add the diced onions and peppers and cook them quickly, about 6 minutes, stirring and tossing, until crisp but tender. Stir this mixture into the beans.


Serve at once.
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Shadows 
Posted: 05-Dec-2004, 12:44 PM
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These could also go in the Early American cooking section. I have made these and used them when hunting and on the trail.

To make a White Portable Soup.


Take a leg of veal, bone it, and take off all the skin and fat; take likewise two dozen of fowl or chickens feet, washed clean, and chopped to pieces; put all into a large stoving-pot, with three gallons of soft water, and let it stove gently, till the meat is so tender as to separate. You must keep your pot tight covered, and a constant fire during the time of its stoving; in about seven or eight hours, try your jelly in a cup, and when quite cold, if it so stiff as that you can cut it with a knife, take it off, and strain it through a sieve, and take off all the fat, and scum first with a spoon, and then with a filtering paper: Provide china cups, and fill them with the clear jelly; set them in a gravy pan, or a large stew-pan of boiling water over a stove; in this water boil your jelly in the cups, till it is as thick as glue. After which, let them stand in the water till they are quite cold: Before you turn them out of your cups, run the edge of a knife round to loosen them; then turn them upon a piece of new flannel, which will draw out all the moisture gradually. Turn them every six or eight hours, till they are perfectly dry, and like a piece of glue; keep them in as dry a place as you can, and in a little time they will be so hard, that you may carry them in your pocket, without the least inconvenience. When you want to use it, take a piece about the bigness of a walnut, and pour a pint of boiling water on it, stirring it till it is dissolved; season it with salt to your taste, and you will have a bason of strong broth. If you want a dish of soup, boil vermicelli in water; then to a cake of your soup, pour a pint of water, so that four cakes will make two quarts; when it is thoroughly melted, set it over the fire just to simmer; pour it into the dish, put in thin slices of bread hardened before the fire, and the vermicelli upon them. Thus you have a dish of soup in about half an hour. Whilst this is doing, you may have any thing dressing to follow, which will not only be a good addition to your dinner, but saving time.

Note. Season it to your palate, as there is no salt or seasoning in the preparation.




To make a Brown Portable Soup.

Take a large leg of beef, bone it, and take off the skin, and what fat you can; put it into a stoving pot, with a tight cover; put to it about four gallons of soft water, with six anchovies, half an ounce of mace, a few cloves, half an ounce of whole white pepper, three onions cut in two, a bunch of thyme,sweet marjoram and parsley, with the bottom crust of a two-penny loaf that is well baked; cover it very close, and let it have a constant fire to do leisurely for seven or eight hours; then stir it very well together, to make the meat separate; cover it close again, and in an hour try your broth in a cup, to see if it will glutinate; if it does, take it off, and strain it through a canvass jelly bag into a clean pan; then have China or well glazed earthen cups, and fill them with the clear jelly; put them into a broad gravy pan, or stew-pan, with boiling water; set in the cups, and let them boil in that till they are perfectly glue. When they are almost cold, run a knife round them, and turn them upon a piece of new flannel, to draw out all the moisture; in six or seven hours turn them, and do so till they are perfectly hard and dry; put them into stone jars, and keep them in a dry place.

This is very good for soups, sauces, and gravies. When you intend to make it into soup, shred and wash very clean what herbs you have to enrich it, as celery,endive,chervil,leeks,lettuce, or indeed what herbs you can get; boil them in water till they are tender, strain them off, and with that water dissolve what quantity of portable soup you please, according to the strength you would have it. If you are where you can get it, fry a French roll, and put it in the middle of your dish, moistened first with some of your soup; and when your cakes are thoroughly melted, put your herbs to it, and set it over the fire till it is just at boiling; then dish it up, and send it to table.


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Shadows 
Posted: 29-Apr-2006, 08:28 AM
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Even though I dislike using charcoal briquttes for direct cooking, the use in this recipe is not as invasive to the flavors and makes using your camp dutchoven easier:

Recipe Name: HAM & POTATOES AU GRATIN
Category: HAM
Serves: 6

11/2 cups cooked ham diced
1 cup grated cheese
2 cups milk
1 onion minced
3 cups potatoes diced
2 tables fine bread crumbs
1 teaspo salt
3 tables flour
1 teaspo pepper
vegetable spray
4 tables butter

In the lid of your Dutch Oven over medium heat ( use 10 or 11 briquets for medium heat ) melt butter and saute onion. Blend in flour to make a light rue. Gradually add milk and cook; stirring until thickened. Add pepper and seasoned salt. (Set aside) spray your Dutch Oven with non-stick vegetable spray. In the bottom of your Dutch Oven cook over medium heat ( use 10 or 11 briquets for medium heat ) the ham and potatoes. After potatoes are ˝ cooked and half is browned remove from heat. Pour rue over the potatoes and ham and sprinkle cheese and bread crumbs over top. Cook over medium heat ( use 27 briquets for 350 degrees.) Place 2/3 of the briquets on top of your Dutch Oven and 1/3 underneath (i.e.: 18 briquets on top and 9 briquets underneath) for 30 minutes or until potatoes are tender.


This can be cooked in an oven indoors using your Dutchoven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.
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