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Shadows 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 07:46 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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I will start off with this early American recipe for what was called mangoes:

Recipe Name: STUFFED PICKLED PEPPERS
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 12

SOURCE OLD TIME PICLING AND SPICING RECIPES

12 Medium Green Peppers
2 Cup Cabbage,finelly-chopped
1 Cup Onion, Chopped and peeled
1/2 Cup Green Pepper,Chopped
1/2 Cup Sweet Red Pepper, chopped
1/2 Cup Celery, Chopped
1 Tblsp Mustard seeds
1/2 Tblsp Celery seeds
1/4 Cup Horseradish, fresh grated or prepared
1/4 Cup Salt
1/4 Cup Brown Sugar (packed)
1 Pint Cider Vinegar
1/2 Tsp. Cayenne Pepper
1 Tsp. Paprika
1/2 Tsp. Dry mustard
plus for pickling brine
3 Pint Cider Vinegar
1 Quart Water
1/2 Cup Salt
1 Tblsp Celery seed
1 1/2 Tblsp Mustard seed
4 Tblsp Whole Cloves
2 Tblsp Whole Allspice
1 3 inch Cinnamon stick, broken
2 Blades Mace or
1 Tsp. Ground Mace
Olive Oil, 1/2 cup per jar

A lot of trouble to make, but well worth while. Old time cooks called these and stuffed fruits "mangoes". They were favorites in English-American homes because the flavor is superb with baked ham, game, roast pork, and with baked beans.
Serve whole as a salad or slice and use as garnish.

Wash all vegetables well before chopping, drain peppers; cut off tops and save; remove seeds and membranes. Cover tops and peppers with water in a sauce pan and bring to boiling; boil gently 10 minutes, or until almost tender. Drain and let cool. Combine chopped vegetables. Mix remaining ingredients ( down to pickling brine) and pour over vegitables and mix well. Stuff into peppers , do not pack too tightly. Place tops on peppers. Tie in place with cotton string. Place peppers in wide mouth jars or stone crock. Heat together in a agate or enamel kettle all of the brine ingredients axcept the oil.

Bring this mixture to a boil; pour over stuffed peppers. Let cool. To each 3 peppers in a jar or crock add about half cup olive oil. Cover. Let stand in a cool place 10 days or longer before serving. To serve remove string, drain peppers.

Note: The remaining oil and spice mixture can be used as a salad dressing or marinade.


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Shadows 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 07:50 AM
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ZodiacHolly

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This one is a must try!!! It is best with fresh tomatoes, but home canned works well.

Recipe Name: STEWED TOMATOES JEFFERSON
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 4

SOURCE FRUGAL GOURMET

3 Tblsp butter
1 sliced yellow onion
6 whole tomatoes or
1 Quart canned tomatoes
to taste basil or oregano or both
1/4 Cup dry white wine or beer
to taste salt and pepper

Thomas Jefferson was an excellent cook. He was one of the first to use tomatoes in this country.

Melt butter in a saucepan and saute` onion until clear. Add remaining ingredients and simmer over low heat until tomatoes are very tender or to your liking. Serve hot.

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Shadows 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 07:55 AM
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This recipe is for open fire cooking at camp, but can be made at home just as well.

Recipe Name: SEARED VENISON W ROSEMARY AND CHERRIES
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 4

1 1/2 Tsp. teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
1 Tsp. coriander seeds
1 Large garlic clove
1 1/2 Tsp. teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 Pound venison tenderloin
1/4 Cup dry red wine
1/4 Cup dried tart cherries
2/3 Cup beef broth
1/2 Cup water
1 Tsp. cornstarch
2 Tblsp black-currant jelly

Grind 1 teaspoon rosemary with coriander seeds and garlic with a mortar and pestle to make a paste, then stir in 1/2 teaspoon oil (this can be done ahead of time at home).

Pat venison dry and put in a bowl, then rub with paste. Season well with pepper, then cover and chill 20 minutes.

Preheat dutch oven to 450°F ( hot ).

Add remaining teaspoon oil, tilting oven to coat evenly. Season venison well with salt, then brown, turning once, about 6 minutes total.

Roast venison ( majority of coals on lid ) until an instant-read thermometer inserted diagonally into center registers 125°F, 7 to 10 minutes. Transfer meat to a plate and keep warm.

Add wine and cherries to oven and deglaze by boiling over moderately high heat, stirring and scraping up brown bits. Stir together broth, water, cornstarch, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon rosemary in a bowl and add to oven. Simmer, stirring, until mixture is thickened, about 5 minutes. Whisk in jelly and salt and pepper to taste.

Cut venison into 1/4-inch-thick slices and serve with sauce.
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Shadows 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 08:00 AM
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Recipe Name: Pheasant Breasts in Apple-Sage Fricassee
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 4

5 Tblsp all-purpose flour
1/4 Tsp. salt
1/4 Tsp. black pepper
1/4 Tsp. paprika
4 pheasant breast halves, boneless and skinless
chicken can be used in substitution
3 Tblsp olive oil
1/2 Cup diced onion
1/2 Cup diced celery
1/2 Cup diced red bell pepper
1 Clove garlic, crushed
1/2 Cup calvados (brandy)
1/2 Tsp. sage
1 Cup cream
1 Cup chicken or pheasant stock
2 Granny Smith apples, cored and diced with the peel

In a small bowl, combine the flour, salt, pepper, and paprika. Dredge the pheasant breasts in this mixture. Heat the olive oil in a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Brown the breasts on both sides, about 4 minutes a side. Remove from the skillet and set aside on a plate.
Add the onion, celery, red pepper, and garlic to the skillet and sauté, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes or until the vegetables are soft. You may need to lower the heat to prevent the vegetables from browning.

Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of the flour mixture over the vegetables and stir for 1 minute to dissolve. Whisk the calvados, sage, cream, and stock into the skillet. Stir until the mixture is smooth and beginning to thicken.

Put the pheasant breasts and apples into the skillet and simmer on low for 10 minutes, spooning the sauce over the meat a couple of times. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve over egg noodles or rice.
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MacErca 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 10:55 AM
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Shadows
Man these are some fantastic recipes, but if I try everyone you wont be able to get me through the door. laugh.gif drool.gif


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Shadows 
Posted: 15-Dec-2003, 09:45 AM
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ZodiacHolly

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Again this one is for open fire/hearth cooking but can be adapted for the modern kitchen.


Recipe Name: BAKED ONIONS WITH THYME
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 6

SOURCE SHADOWS

6 medium red or white onions (3 1/2 lb)
3 Tblsp fine-quality extra-virgin olive oil
10 fresh thyme sprigs or
1 Tsp. dried thyme
Fine sea salt to taste
1/2 Cup Chianti or other dry red wine
1/4 Cup water

Oil and Preheat dutch oven to 400°F (hot).

Cut a slice from both ends of each onion, then halve onions crosswise. Discard outer layers from onions, leaving about a 2 1/2-inch diameter.

Arrange onions, trimmed ends down in dutch oven. Drizzle with oil.

Remove leaves from 2 thyme sprigs and sprinkle over onions. Season with sea salt and pepper, then scatter remaining 8 sprigs over onions. Pour wine over onions.

Bake, with majority of coals on lid, basting with pan juices twice during baking, 40 minutes. Add water to oven and bake until onions are browned and tender, about 50 minutes more. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Makes 6 (first course) servings

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Shadows 
Posted: 17-Dec-2003, 09:43 PM
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QUOTE (MacErca @ Dec 14 2003, 10:55 AM)
Shadows
Man these are some fantastic recipes, but if I try everyone you wont be able to get me through the door. laugh.gif drool.gif

Thanks! Do you have any you want to share?

There are 3 elements of the good life :

Sex
Good Sex
and :

Good Food!

Good Food can fill the void ! LOL laugh.gif
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Shadows 
Posted: 18-Dec-2003, 12:52 PM
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This is a quick and easy breakfast from the past.

Recipe Name: EGG IN THE NEST
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 1

1 Slice of bread
1 Large egg
2 Slice bacon

Fry the bacon in your skillet. Meanwhile cut or tear out a circle
(I use a biscuit cutter) in the center of the bread. When the bacon is
done remove it from the pan and place the bread in the pan. Crack the
egg into the hole you created in the bread. Place the cut out portion in the pan to toast. Fry egg to your liking, turn over the cut out portion to brown the other side. The egg and bread can either be turned for a few seconds or left as sunny side up. Serve with the bacon.

For some reason kids love this simple breakfast....might be the name
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Shadows 
Posted: 30-Dec-2003, 01:37 PM
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Here is one I have had at Williamsburg, it is sooo goood!!! I have substituted venison for the lamb with excellent results!


Recipe Name: Shepherd's Pie
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 8

SOURCE CHOWNING'S TAVERN - COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG

For the stew:

2 Pound lean boneless leg of lamb, cut into 1 /2­inch cube
4 Tblsp unsalted butter
1/2 Pound turnips, peeled and diced
1/3 Pound carrots, peeled and diced
3 celery stalks. trimmed and sliced
1 Medium onion, peeled and diced
1 Tsp. fresh thyme leaves
1/2 Cup all­purpose flour
2 Cup beef stock , water, or wine
1/3 Cup tomato paste
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

For the potato topping:

2 Pound white or red boiling potatoes, peeled and cut into
1­inch cubes
1/4 Pound (1 stick) unsalted butter
1 egg
1 egg yolk
1 Tsp. salt. or to taste
1/2 Tsp. freshly ground white pepper, or to taste.

1. To make the stew, melt the butter in a Dutch oven or large saucepan over medium high heat. Add the lamb and brown on all sides, making sure not to crowd the pan. This may have to be done in batches. Remove the lamb from the pan with a slotted spoon, and set aside.


2. Add the turnips, carrots, celery and onion to the pan, and saute for 3 minutes, stirring frequently, or until the onions are translucent. Return the lamb to the pan along with the thyme, and sprinkle the flour over the lamb and vegetables. Cook over low heat for 3 minutes, stirring frequently, to cook the flour. Add the cold stock or water, raise the heat to medium high, and bring to a boil. Stir in the tomato paste, and season with salt and pepper. Cook the lamb mixture covered over low heat for 40 to 55 minutes, or until the lamb is tender.


3. While the lamb is braising, place the potatoes in salted cold water and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil the potatoes until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain, and then mash the potatoes using a potato masher or hand­held electric mixer with the butter, egg, yolk, salt and pepper. Place the mixture in a pastry bag fitted with a large star tip.


4. To serve, preheat an oven broiler. Place the lamb into a large baking dish or individual dishes, and pipe the potatoes into a latticework pattern on the top. Place 6 inches from the broiler element, and brown the potatoes. Serve immediately.


Note: The lamb and potatoes can be prepared up to a day in advance and refrigerated, tightly covered. Reheat the lamb over low heat before piping the potatoes and the final broiling
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Shadows 
Posted: 30-Dec-2003, 01:43 PM
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Here is another good one!

Recipe Name: DUCK, WILD OR TAME ROASTED W/STUFFING
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 4

5 Pound duck or 2 - 2 1/2 lb ducks
1/4 tsp garlic salt
1 Cup wild rice
2 QT boiling water
2 tsp salt
1 Pound fresh mushrooms, sauted
1 tsp sage
1/4 tsp thyme
2 tbsp melted fat, (butter or wh
each ever)
3 slices bacon
1 Cup orange juice (optional)

Wash, singe and clean duck.
Season with salt and pepper and garlic salt.
Cook rice in boiling water until tender, approximately 20 minutes.
Drain and rinse rice with hot water. Add remaining ingredients and blend well.
Fill the duck with the rice stuffing; place in pan and cover with three slices of bacon.
Roast uncovered, in a slow oven at 325 degrees F or closed in a Dutch oven, allowing 20 to 30 minutes per pound. Ducks must not be overcooked or the meat will be dry and crumbly.
If desired, baste every 15 to 20 minutes with orange juice for added flavor.

Can be done on a spit over open fire also.


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Shadows 
Posted: 07-Jan-2004, 02:59 PM
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This could go in the German recipe section, but since I found this taste treat in a Colonial collection of recipes ( The Open Hearth - A colonial cookbook ) I thought I would put it here:

SCHNITZ UND KNEPP
( Dried Apples and Dumplings)

1 qt dried apples
2 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 egg, well beaten
2/3 cup milk ( approx.)
3 pounds of cured ham
2 cups sifted flour
4 tsp baking powder
3 Tbsp. melted butter

Wash apples and place in bowl. Cover with water; soak overnight. Place ham in large kettle; cover with water. Cook for 3 hours. Add apples and water in which they were soaked; cook for 1 hour. Add brown sugar. Mix well. Sift flour, salt, baking powder and pepper together in a bowl. Add butter , eggs and enough milk to make a stiff batter; mix well. Drop by spoonfuls into hot liquid with apples and ham. Cover kettle tightly. Cook for 18 minutes.

serves 8

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Shadows 
Posted: 19-Jan-2004, 10:07 PM
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This one is a motherland England recipe , but I am sure it was made here in the early days:

Recipe Name: BACON FLODDIES
Category: BREAKFAST
Serves: 4

8 Ounce potato, peeled
2 Medium onion, peeled
6 Ounce bacon, finely chopped
2 Ounce flour, self rising
salt and pepper , to taste
2 eggs, beaten
4 Tblsp oil
or
1 1/2 Ounce bacon fat

Served with sausages and eggs as a breakfast or supper dish, they can be served on their own if preferred. Floddies are traditional to the Tyneside town of Gateshead.

Grate the potatoes, squeeze out any liquid and place in a bowl.

Grate or finely chop the onions and add to the potatoes with the bacon, flour and seasoning. Mix very well together.

Stir in the eggs. Heat the oil or bacon fat in a large frying pan. Put tablespoons of the mixture into the pan and fry steadily for 5-8 minutes, turning once, until golden brown and cooked through.

Drain on kitchen paper and keep hot until ready to serve with sausages and eggs.
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Shadows 
Posted: 21-Jan-2004, 10:28 PM
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BUTTER-RUM BAKED APPLES



8 Golden Delicious apples with stems
2/3 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup dark rum
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
8 (2- by 1/2-inch) strips fresh lemon zest
8 whole cloves

Preheat dutch oven to 450°F (hot).

Cut off top third of each apple and reserve. Scoop out seeds and some of flesh from apples using a melon-ball cutter or round teaspoon measure to form a cavity (do not puncture bottoms). Stand apples in dutch oven tightly.

Heat remaining ingredients in a small saucepan over moderate heat, stirring, until sugar is dissolved. Pour some of syrup into cavity of each apple and remainder into dutch oven. Return apple tops to apples and cover oven.

Bake in oven until apples are tender, 25 to 30 minutes (place the majority of coals on the oven lid).

Makes 8 servings

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Shadows 
Posted: 07-Mar-2004, 12:15 PM
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Here is a link to a site that I found sometime ago... it is for the serious student of Early American Cookery:

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/cookbooks/genre...e.cfm?GenreNo=1

I am sorry the above link does not seem to work any more as of 8/14/2005, I will try to find out where it went and post the new link soon.

This post has been edited by Shadows on 14-Aug-2005, 07:18 AM
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Shadows 
Posted: 28-Jun-2004, 03:44 PM
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Recipe Name: RASPBERRY SUMMER PUDDING (ENGLISH STYLE)
Category: DESSERTS
Serves: 3

3 cups Raspberries fresh
1 1/2 cups Sugar
1 tables Water
6 slices Bread
Whipped cream

Place the berries, sugar, and water in a saucepan. Slowly cook, while stirring, for 3 to 5 minutes. Allow to cool slightly. Line a one-quart bowl with the bread (saving one piece for the top). Add the cooked berries to the bowl and top with the last bread slice. Loosely cover with plastic wrap. Place a weight (canned goods work well) on the pudding and refrigerate overnight. Serve chilled by inverting on a plate. Top with whipped cream.
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