Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )



Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> Learning Scots Gaelic, anybody want to try?
Bookmark and Share
Knightly Knight 
Posted: 04-Jan-2004, 09:28 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



King of the Kowboys
Group Icon

Group: Scotland
Posts: 260
Joined: 10-Oct-2002
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Saint Louis, Missouri

male





Halo Celticrose. Tha mi gu math, tapadh leibh. Ciamar a tha shibh fhein?
Is mise Darrell Tha mitoilchte ur coinneachadh. Tha mi Amaireaga.

Hello CelticRose I am fine thank you. How are you?(yourself) My name is Darrell
I'm pleased to meet you. I come from America.


CelticRose I too am a beginner. Ive never gotten much past the first few pages of any language book unless I have someone to practice with. I dont even know how to change my keyboard to get the right accent marks yet.

Let do write back and forth in Gaelic as much as possible. Im absolutely sure those who would have us learn can correct and encourage us.

Today my wife and I were shopping. She might say something i agreed with so I'd reply with "Tha sin ceart" (That is right) sounds like" ha shin charst" Shes perfectly ok with me practicing with her as long she understands What I am saying.
She says someone with Irish blood shouldnt be trusting someone with Scottish blood too far

CelticRose you mentioned singing in this language. I write songs on the side. Think about all the songs which have I Love You as the title and main theme of the songs? Well Im thinking if all you knew was Ciamar a that shibh? , It would be enough to start your own song. So Id say you have have enough vocablulary already

thumbs_up.gif Slainte mhor agad
LOL

Lets continue and have fun thumbs_up.gif


--------------------
If Jimmy cracked corn and no one cares, Why is there a song about it?
PMEmail Poster               
Top
DesertRose 
Posted: 04-Jan-2004, 10:01 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 6,913
Joined: 09-Nov-2003
ZodiacAlder

Realm: The desert of Arizona

female





Halo a-rithist! Is mise Rosemary. Tha mitoilchte ur coinneachach, cuideachd. Tha mi gu math anis tapadh leibh. Tha mi a Arizona. Tha mi posda, cuideachd.

(Hello again. I am Rosemary. I am pleased to meet you also. I am doing good now, thank you. I am from Arizona. I am married also.)

Thanks Darrell for writing out the English too. That is the only way I can learn and put it all together right now. You I posted pages and pages of lessons for us and then afterwards it kind of all blew my brain, there was so much information!

At least you have someone to practice with the pronunciation as well. Sounds like your wife is going to be learning the language as well! biggrin.gif

It would be nice if we could this for awhile until we get to where some of the Gaelic speakers are now. So I appreciate you helping me out too. And like you say people that come in here can correct us and maybe teach us more!

I know how to change my keyboard to do the accents but for some reason it will not work when I try to reply to a post! Don't ask me why! unsure.gif

That is really neat that you could write songs in Gaelic. I would just like to be able to sing along with my Runrig and Capercaillie CDs!

Beannachd leihb!
Blessings to you or Goodbye! thumbs_up.gif


--------------------
Fine art & photography by DESERT ROSE IMAGES
http://www.desertrose-images.com
PMEmail PosterUsers WebsiteMy Photo Album               
Top
C Dubh 
Posted: 05-Jan-2004, 03:55 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 321
Joined: 15-Dec-2003
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Alba

male





Hal Knightly knight agus Celtic-Rose.

'S e Albannach a th' annam agus...
I'm Scottish and...
Tha mi s a' Ghalltachd.
I'm from the Lowlands.
Tha mi ag ionnsachadh Gidhlig cuideachd, ach...
I'm learning Gaelic also, but...
Chan eil deagh Ghidhlig agam idrir an-drsda, tha eagal orm.
But I don't have good Gaelic at all at the moment, I'm afraid.
Chan eil fhathast co-dhi!
Not yet anyway!
Chi mi a dh'aithghearr sibh.
See you soon.

Oidhche mhath. beer_mug.gif


--------------------
Bruidhinnibh Gidhlig Rium.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Knightly Knight 
Posted: 05-Jan-2004, 07:28 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



King of the Kowboys
Group Icon

Group: Scotland
Posts: 260
Joined: 10-Oct-2002
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Saint Louis, Missouri

male





Well Cu Dubh, thats easy for you to say LOL

thanks so much - I just got your reply, now im trying to learn the pronunciation.

How do I set up my keyboard so I can get the correct accent marks?

Im afraid your Gaidhlig is much better than my English LOL. Im breaking out my

map to find out just where the Lowlands are located. Thanks again
thumbs_up.gif



PMEmail Poster               
Top
Aaediwen 
Posted: 05-Jan-2004, 08:55 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
Group Icon

Group: Super Moderator
Posts: 3,061
Joined: 09-Oct-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: Kentucky

male





300 192 C0 A LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH GRAVE

310 200 C8 E LATIN CAPITAL LETTER E WITH GRAVE

314 204 CC I LATIN CAPITAL LETTER I WITH GRAVE

322 210 D2 O LATIN CAPITAL LETTER O WITH GRAVE

331 217 D9 U LATIN CAPITAL LETTER U WITH GRAVE

340 224 E0 a LATIN SMALL LETTER A WITH GRAVE

350 232 E8 e LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH GRAVE

354 236 EC i LATIN SMALL LETTER I WITH GRAVE

362 242 F2 o LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH GRAVE

371 249 F9 u LATIN SMALL LETTER U WITH GRAVE

Num lock off, hold the left ALT key and type the second number listed on the number pad
ex: LALT+242 == . With this technique, you can type any character on any Keyboard. I've found it to work well in Windows and in Linux console, but X trapps the Meta (LALT) key and I have yet to learn how to get around it. I don't have a MAC to see how well it works there. I pulled this from one of the keycode man pages in Linux, I forget which one, but I could look it up if desired. I've got a file where I saves the ones needed for German, Spanish, and Gaelic from which I copied the above.


--------------------
Poet and seeker of knowledge



Mountain Legacy -- Born in the isles, raised in Appalachia
PMEmail Poster My Photo Album               View My Space Profile.
Top
DesertRose 
Posted: 06-Jan-2004, 02:57 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 6,913
Joined: 09-Nov-2003
ZodiacAlder

Realm: The desert of Arizona

female





Hello everyone! I just got my "Teach Yourself Gaelic? in the mail! I am soooooo excited! It came with audio tapes as well.

The one thing I noticed in looking in the book is that it spells Halo with 2 L's as in Hallo! so I am confused which is right!

Cu Dubh! Thanks so much for translating in English for us very beginners. I hope that isn't a pain for you. I wrote some stuff down that you said to help me out further.

The other thing I noticed in this book it spells Is mise as 'S mise! So now I am confused on that too as to which is correct!

Anyway, sorry I am not speaking Gaelic today, but have been battling with my computer all day that got attacked with spyware and am a bit tired from that but wanted to write you all.

Chi mi rithist thu
see you again, bye
PMEmail PosterUsers WebsiteMy Photo Album               
Top
C Dubh 
Posted: 06-Jan-2004, 04:54 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 321
Joined: 15-Dec-2003
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Alba

male





I'm so glad your book has come CelticRose, it should really help you master the basics. Hall/Hal isn't really a Gaelic word. No truly Gaelic words begin with 'H'. I've seen both spellings of hello & I think that both are correct. You won't find them in a Gaelic dictionary anyway. Is mise/'S mise again both are correct, as in English the apostrophe denotes a missing letter. In this case the missing 'I' of 'Is' . Sorry to hear about you computer problems. Hope they get sorted soon.
Knightly Knight, the Scottish Lowlands is everything south of the Scottish Highlands. I suppose for many non-Scots Scottishness & Highland culture are synonymous. Kilts, the Highland bapipe, the Gaelic, The Clans etc. But most of these things are quite alien to the Lowlander except maybe at weddings or the New Year. I love Highland culture, but i realise it is not mine & alas I am only now learning Gaelic.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Knightly Knight 
Posted: 06-Jan-2004, 05:49 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



King of the Kowboys
Group Icon

Group: Scotland
Posts: 260
Joined: 10-Oct-2002
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Saint Louis, Missouri

male





Knightly Knight, the Scottish Lowlands is everything south of the Scottish Highlands. I suppose for many non-Scots Scottishness & Highland culture are synonymous. Kilts, the Highland bapipe, the Gaelic, The Clans etc. But most of these things are quite alien to the Lowlander except maybe at weddings or the New Year. I love Highland culture, but i realise it is not mine & alas I am only now learning Gaelic.


I understand Cu Dubh. im sure its like looking for everything youve ever heard about in America and trying to see it in one place. It just doesnt happen.LOL
I was quite surprised to find that maybe 70 percent of Scots are not associated to a Clan, but thats why we need the education to dispel all they myths. LOL
The one common denominator Ive seen within these posts are Scottish natives who are educated and ready to help. Thanks a bunch thumbs_up.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
C Dubh 
Posted: 07-Jan-2004, 05:08 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 321
Joined: 15-Dec-2003
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Alba

male





Ciamar a tha sibh?
How are you all?
Tha mi 'n dchas gu bheil sibh gu math,
I hope that you are well?
Ciamar a th' an computar agad CelticRose?
How's your computer CelticRose?
Saoil a bheil e 'g obair ceart gu ler a-nis?
Wonder if it's working ok now?
Tha mi 'n dchas gu bheil.
I hope so.
Uill tha mi a' dol a choimhead air an telebhisean an-drsda...Oidhche mhath.
Well. i'm off to watch tv now...Good night. smile.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
DesertRose 
Posted: 07-Jan-2004, 11:38 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 6,913
Joined: 09-Nov-2003
ZodiacAlder

Realm: The desert of Arizona

female





Feasgar math Knightly Knight and Cu Dubh.
Good evening

Ciamar a tha sibh?
How are you both?

Tha mi sgith an-drasda,
I am tired at the moment.

Been fighting with this computer for two days and finally got it fixed....fingers crossed.....I hope. Had a bad virus that by-passed my anti-virus program.

I have not had a chance to look at my book Gaelic book yet. It looks really good from just glancing through it.

Cu Dubh that is very interesting about the Lowlanders. There was a lot I didn't know or just assumed about the Scottish culture, but I am trying to learn. Would love for you to share more.

I will try to talk with you all tomorrow.

Mar sin leibh.

PMEmail PosterUsers WebsiteMy Photo Album               
Top
Faileas 
  Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 04:49 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Guardian of Scotland :-)
Group Icon

Group: Scotland
Posts: 399
Joined: 19-Nov-2002
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Isle of Skye

female





Feasgar math, a h-uile duine an seo smile.gif Ciamar a tha sibh, a chairdean

Good evening , everybody here smile.gif How are you, my friends?

Tha mi' n dochas gun robh Oidhche Chaillein math agaibh agus nach robh an ceann
goirt agaibh an ath mhaddain.

I hope that you had a good Hogmanay and that your head was not too sore the morning after

Tha cuisean uabhasach math anns an Eilean Sgitheanach , ged tha 's gu bheil an t-uisge ann na laithean seo.

Things on the Isle of Skye are very good, even though it is raining these days.

Agus, a Ch Dhubh, tha mise a' smaoineachadh gu bheil Gaidhlig uabhasach math agad ...... biggrin.gif biggrin.gif Or don't the rest of ye folks think, that our Black Dogs Gaidhlig is terribly well?

Two things about the topics ye mentioned a couple of days ago:

Answering questions positive and negative:

The general pattern is that you use the positive form of the verb that was used in the question so for example, if a question starts with "a bheil" - "Are you" , the answer is "Tha" or "Chan eil", in future that would be "Am bi" - "Will you"
, the answer is "Bithidh" yes or "cha bhi" - no ; the past tense is "An robh" Were you with the answers "bha" yes and "cha robh". The verb "bi" - to be, is an irregular one which is the reason for the different forms, basically meaning you cannot form the tenses from the verb root and the form is a completely different word. But the principle works for irregular verbs and regular verbs is the same.

So for regular verbs such as "cluiche" - play, the pattern is as follows:

presence you would form with "a bheil thu a ' cluiche" - are you playing which you' d answer as seen with "Tha" or "chan eil"

future:

an cluich thu? - Will you play?
cluichidh - i will play
cha cluich - i won't play

past tense:

an do chluich thu? - Did you play?
chluich - i played
cha do chluich - i didn't play

Hope its not too confusing wink.gif

As for numbers , the numbers you gave were spot on smile.gif, but when you use them on their on they have the article added to it so that you get

a h-aon
a dha
a tri
a ceithir
a coig
a sia
a seachd
a h-ochd
a naoi
a deich

a h-aon deug
a dha - deug
...
a fichead - twenty

Btw , both "da" and "fichead" lenite the following nown and leave it in the singular form, so you get "da char" - two cars and "fichead bhliadhna" - twenty years wink.gif


As for singing along with Runrig and Capercaille I have found both bands a great help in pronounciation and gaining of vocabulary. Runrig do have translations with their Gaidhlig songs and i am not sure about Capercaille, but i think there might be some


--------------------
Scottish in Heart :-))

In the darkest heart the pride of man will walk allone

's ged tha mi fada bhuat cha dhealaich sinn a chaoidh

Darkover RPG
PMEmail Poster               
Top
C Dubh 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 05:27 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 321
Joined: 15-Dec-2003
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Alba

male





Hal mo chraidean
Bha an latha gl fhliuch anns a' Ghalltaichd an-diugh cuideachd
QUOTE
Tha mi' n dochas gun robh Oidhche Chaillein math agaibh agus nach robh an ceann goirt agaibh an ath mhaddain.


Bha, bha gu dearbh, tapadh leat agus cha robh mo cheann goirt idir an ath mhaddain! Dh' ol mi-fhin bainne fad na h-oidhche!!! laugh.gif Dh' innis mi do Mhargaret (mise) ach tha mi a ' smaoineachadh nach eil i gam chreidsinn idir idir rolleyes.gif Co-dhi...Greas ort air ais.

Oidhche mhath is beannachd leibh uile.

Take care everyone.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
DesertRose 
Posted: 09-Jan-2004, 05:49 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 6,913
Joined: 09-Nov-2003
ZodiacAlder

Realm: The desert of Arizona

female





Feasgar math a-huile duine!

Thank you Faileas for the lesson. I copied it all down!

Here are some Scots Gaelic names you may be interested in.

I got it from this site: http://www.crosswinds.net/~daire/names/cel...ltscotmale.html
Have fun! smile.gif


Celtic Male Names of Scotland

Main Names Menu ~ Pronunciation & Notes ~ The Names Forum ~ E-mail

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Abhainn ? "river." Aibne.
Acair ? variant of the word meaning "anchor". Acaiseid.
Achaius ? "friend of horses".
Adair ? (Gael) place name meaning "from the oak tree ford" or "oak tree settlement". From a surname, maybe derived from an early Scottish pronunciation of English Edgar. Adaire, Athdar, Edgar.
Adhamh ? Scots-Gaelic spelling of Adam, "of the earth".
Adie ? Scottish pet form of Adam, and less commonly Aidan. Adaidh is the Gaelic spelling of Adie, hence surname MacAdaidh, Anglicized McCadie..
Aedan ? (Scot) a King of Scots in 560. see Aidan.
Aeneas ? rare name; was quite common in Scotland as anglicized form of Aonghas; and in Ireland as anglicized form of igneachn, a personal name from igneach "violent fate or death".
Ahearn ? "lord of the horses". Aherin, Hearn.
Aidan ? Fr. Old Irish aed "fire" + dim. -an. Very old Scottish name. King Aidan mac Gabran, ruled Argyll in the 6th C., first Christian Monarch in the British Isles outside Ireland. 7th C. St. Aidan established the celebrated monastery of Lindisfarne. Aedan.
Ailbeart ? "noble"; Scots-Gaelic form of Albert. Ailbert.
Ailean ? (AY-luhn) "handsome"; also from Old Irish ail "noble" + dim. -an. Anglicized as Alan, related from the Breton language.
Ailein ? from a Gaelic word for "from the green meadow".
Aillig ? "from the stony place". Ail.
Aindrea ? Scots-Gaelic form of Andrew, "strong"; also Anndra.
Ainsley ? (Gael) "my very own meadow or lee".
Alasdair ? (ALL-us-tir) "defender of mankind"; Gaelic evolution of Greek name Alexander. Scottish royal name in 12th C. when Alexander I took the throne. MacAlisters claim descent from Alasdair Mor (d. 1299), son of Donald of Islay, Lord of the Isles. Alister, Alistair, Alastair, Alaisdair, Alisdair, Alastair, Allaster, Alaster, Alasdair (AHL-uhs-duhr), Alexander; pet form Aly; feminine form Alastrina.
Alec ? (Gr) "defender of mankind"; short form of Alexander, now less popular then Alex, possibly because of the term "smart alec". Ailig, Alick.
Alick ? Scottish variant of Alec, which has gained popularity on it own. The form Ellic is in use in the Highlands. Gaelic form is Ailig.
Alpin ? Prob. derived from Latin albinus "white, fair". Borne by at least two Pictish kings, source of surname MacAlpin. Scottish anglicized form of Gaelic Ailpein, a name widely given in the Highlands from the time of earliest historical records. There is no obvious Gaelic etymology, and is often taken to be of Pictish origin. Alpine.
Aluinn ? (AH-loo-in) "handsome" or "cheerful"; Scottish of Celtic origin, possibly a dim. of a word meaning "rock". Ailean, Alan, Allan, Allen (generally only found as a surname in Britain, but equally common as a given name in the USA).
Amhlaidh ? Scottish Gaelic form of Olaf, an Old Norse name introduced to Ireland by Viking settlers. Aulay.
Amhuinn ? "from the alder tree river".
Angus ? "unique choice, chosen one, unique strength", from Old Irish Oengus: oen "one" + gus "vigor". Scottish and Irish; anglicized form of Gaelic Aonghus/Aonghas (EUN-eu-uss), composed of Celtic elements meaning "one" and "choice". Name of an old Celtic god, and is first recorded as a personal name in Adomnan's "Life of St. Columba," where it occurs in the form Oinogus(s)ius as the name of a man for whom the saint prophesied a long life and a peaceful death. Almost certainly the name of an 8th C. Pictish king variously recorded as Omnust and Hungus. traditional first name in Scotland, and of the men of clan Donald, whose ancestors include Angus Og of Islay. Short form Gus; pet form Angie; feminine form Angusina.
Anndra ? (AH-oon-drah) Scots-Gaelic form of Andrew, "manly". St. Andrew the Apostle is the patron saint of Scotland. Aindrea. Andra (Lowland form). Pet forms: Andy, Drew.
Aodh ? (OOH) Fr. Old Irish aed "fire". Frequent name in early Scotland; surname Mackay is based on it. Aoidh, Hugh.
Arailt ? Scots-Gaelic form of Harold.
Archibald ? Scottish of Norman French origin. Composed of elements ercan "genuine" + bald "bold, brave". Equivalent of Scottish Gaelic Gilleasbaig. Pet forms: Archie, Archy (Gaelic Eair®dsidh), Baldie.
Argyle ? taken from the old placename Arregaithel, "from the land of the Gauls".
Armstrong ? Scottish, transferred use of the surname, probably as a nickname for a man with strong arms.
Art ? Irish and Scottish, now as an informal shortening of Arthur.
Artair ? (AHR-shtuhr) "eagle-like" or "high, noble"; Gaelic form of Arthur, fr. Celtic artos "bear", or poss. borrowed from Latin Artorius; and the surname MacArtair is derived, and anglicized as McArthur and Carter. Arth, Artus.
Arthur ? of Celtic origin. King Arthur, British king of 5th C. or 6th C. The name was first found in the Latinized form Artorius and its derivation is obscure.
Athol ? transferred use of the name of a Perthshire district, seat of the dukes of Atholl. The placename is thought to derive from the Gaelic ath Fodla "new Ireland". Atholl, Athole.
Aulay ? from Norse Olaf. Source of surname (and first name) MacAulay; Scottish anglicized form of Amhla(i)dh. See Amhlaoibh.

Baird ? from a clan name, derived fr. Old Irish bard "a bard, poet". Bard.
Baldie ? Scottish pet from of Archibald.
Balfour ? "pasture land".
Balloch ? from a word meaning "from the pasture".
Balmoral ? taken from the placename, "from the majestic village".
Banner ? "flag bearer".
Barclay ? Scottish, Irish; transferred use of the Scottish surname, which was taken to Scotland in the 12th C. by Walter de Berchelai, who became a chamberlain of Scotland in 1165. Probably derived from Berkeley in Gloucestershire, which is from OE beorc "birch tree" + leah "wood or clearing"; "birch tree meadow". In Ireland, its been anglicized in the form of Parthaln. Berkeley.
Bean ? from a Celtic word for "spirit" or "fairy", and means "one who is white-skinned"; Scottish anglicized form of Gaelic name Beathan.
Bearnard ? Irish, Scots-Gaelic form of Bernard; from the Old German words Beirn-hard "brave as a bear".
Bhatar ? (VAH-tuhr) Fr. Germanic wald "rule" + harja "folk". Usually associated with Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832). Moderately popular as a first name in Scotland. Walter.
Birk ? "birch tree".
Blackburn ? "black brook".
Blair ? from a surname; from Gaelic blar "plain, field, battlefield"; or "child of the fields". Blaire, Blayre.
Blane ? from Gaelic bla "yellow". Name of an important Scottish saint who was Bishop of Kingarth in late 6th C.; several Scottish churches are named Kilblane in his honor. Blain, Blaine, Blayne.
Bothan ? from a Gaelic word for "from the stone house".
Boyd ? from Gaelic buidhe "yellow-haired".
Braden ? modern spelling of Bhradain, "salmon".
Braigh ? from the Gaelic word for "from the upper part".
Breac ? from the Celtic word for "speckled". Bryce, Brice.
Bret ? "from Britain". Brit.
Brian ? (ONorse) "strong" or "virtuous"; brought from Ireland, King Brian Boru. Briant, Brion, Bryan, Bryant.
Broc ? from an Old English word for "badger".
Brodie ? from the Irish Gaelic word for "from the ditch".
Bruce ? (Fr) "woods"; derived fr. a surname based on the place name, Braose (now Brieuse) in Normandy, and brought to Scotland by the Normans; most famous Bruce was Robert Bruce, King of Scots from 1306-29, who liberated Scotland fr. English rule at the Battle of Bannockburn.
Busby ? "village on woodlands" or "village in the thicket".
Bryce ? "quick-moving". From name of 4th C. St. Bricius of Tours, France, name is Celtic origin. Bricius' cult was brought to Scotland by the Normans. Brice.
Bryson ? from a surname meaning "son of Bryce".
Buchanan ? from a surname derived from a place name in Stirlingshire. Source is prob. Gaelic bocan "a young male deer".

Cailean ? (KAH-luhn) from Old Irish cuilen "pup, cub, kitten" or "child". Favorite of Campbells and MacKenzies; 1st Campbell chief of Lochawe, Cailean Mor, was killed in a battle with the MacDougals in 1294, since then the chief of the clan has been MacCailein Mor "Son of Big Cailean". Cael, Caelin, Callean, Colin, Cailean (CAL-lan).
Cairns ? Gaelic place word that became a surname and first name. Traditionally, a cairn is a heap of stones placed on top of a grave.
Calum ? (KA-luhm) from Latin columba "dove". 6th C. Irish missionary St. Columba (Colm Cille in Irish) founded a monastery on the island of Iona which became a great center of learning. Also used as a nickname for Malcolm. Callum.
Camden ? "from the winding or crooked valley". Camdin, Camdan.
Cameron ? (Celt) from cam + shron "nose", or brun "hill". An important clan name, place name in the old kingdom of Fife. Camar, Camshron, Camero, Camey.
Campbell ? (KAM-bel) from cam "crooked" + beul "mouth". A clan name that is also used a first name. Cambeul, Cam, Camp.
Carey ? (Welsh) "stoney, rock island".
Carlton ? from the Old English words Carla-tun "farmers' settlement".
Carmichael ? "follower of Michael".
Carney ? "fighter".
Carr ? "from the marsh"; derived from the Norse word for "marsh". Cathair, Cary.
Cathal ? Fr. Old Irish cath "battle". Ancient first name is source of the surname Macall.
Cawley ? from the Gaelic word for "relic". Camhlaidh, Cauley.
Ceard ? from the Gaelic word for "smith". Ceardach.
Chalmers ? "son of the lord". Clamer, Chalmer.
Charles ? (OFr) "full-grown, manly". Terlach.
Chattan ? from the Gaelic word for "cat"; clan name that is used as a first name also. Chait.
Cinead ? Prob. Pictish in origin; in 843, King Cinead Mac Ailpin united Gaels and Picts in one kingdom, Scotia. Ceanag (KEN-uhk); anglecized as Kenneth; feminine form is Kenna.
Clach ? from the Gaelic word for "stone".
Cleit ? from the Gaelic word for "rocky promontory".
Clennan ? from a Celtic word for "servant of Finnian".
Clyde ? (Scottish) name of the famous Scottish river.
Coinneach ? (KON-yokh or KUH-nyuhx) Fr. Old Irish Cainnech, derived fr. cain "good, beautiful"; "handsome face or head". St. Cainnech founded monasteries in Ireland and Scotland in the 6th C.; city of Kilkenny (Cell Coinneach) in Ireland takes its name from him. Identical to Irish name Cainnech; anglicized as Kenneth.
Colin ? (KAW-lin)(Gael) "child"; "victory of the people"; or "young cub". Cailean, Colan, Collin, Coll.
Conan ? "wise"; Scottish form of the Irish name. Connor, Conon.
Connell ? (Celt) "high and mighty".
Conran ? St. Conran, 7th C. bishop and apostle to Orkney Islands.
Corey ? (kohr-ee) "ravine"; sometimes translated as "seething pool". Cori, Cory.
Craig ? from Gaelic place word creag "crag, cliff" or "steep rock"; "crag dweller" or "from near the crag". Also used as a surname. Craigen, Kraig, Craggie.
Crannog ? "lake dweller".
Criostal ? (KREE-uh-stuhl) Gaelic form of Christopher. Produced Scottish surnames, Chrystal, Cristal, and MacCristal.
Crsdean ? "Christ-bearer". Gaelic form of Christopher.
Cullen ? "young animal, handsome".
Culloden ? personal name from the placename of Culloden, meaning "from the nook of the marsh".

Dabhaidh ? (DA-ee-vee or DAEE-vee) "beloved"; Gaelic form of David. St. David, son of King Malcolm III and Queen Margaret, was King of Scots from 1124-53. Daibhidh.
Dallas ? Scots-Gaelic for "from the waterfall"; name of a town in Scotland and used as a personal name. Dallieass, Dallis, Dalys.
Dalziel ? "small field". Daziel, Dalyell.
Damh ? "ox". Daimh.
Dnaidh ? Danny.
Darach ? from the Gaelic word for "oak".
Davis ? "David's son". Dave, Davidson, MacDaibhidh.
Deargh ? from a Gaelic word for "red".
Denholm ? place name; prob. Denholm, Scotland, otherwise unknown.
Derek ? (OGer) "people's ruler". Dirk, Derrick.
Diarmad ? (DYEER-muht) from Old Irish Diarmait, "sorrow". Early Irish literature, Scottish and Irish ballads and folktales, Diarmaid was a member of the warrior band of Finn mac Cumaill. Diarmaid had a love spot on his face that made women fall instantly in love with him. Clan Campbell traces its ancestry to one Diarmid O'Duibne. Dermot.
Doire ? "from the grove". Dhoire.
Donald ? from Gaelic Domhnall (DAW-nuhl) derived fr. Old Irish domnan "world" + gal "valor"; "brown or dark"; or "proud ruler". Donald was an early Scottish royal name; Clan Donald, most powerful Highland clan, took the name from a 15th C. Donald, grandson of Somerled, Lord of the Isles. Don, Donn, Donall, Donalt, Donaugh, Donel, Donell, Dmhnull, Dmhnall, Dmhnal (DAW-ull), Donaidh (Donnie).
Donnan ? Fr. Old Irish donn meaning "brown" or "chief" + dim. -an. Name of 7th C. abbot of Iona who founded many churches in Scotland.
Donnchadh ? (DON-ah-choo) old Gaelic spelling of Duncan, meaning "dark-skinned stranger" or "dark-skinned warrior".
Dorrell ? "king's doorkeeper".
Dougal ? Gaelic Dubhghlas (DOO-luhs) Fr. Old Irish dubh "dark" + glas "green or blue". Common Celtic river name surviving as the rivers Douglas in Ireland and Scotland, Dulas in Wales, and Dawlish, Dowles and Divelish in England. Douglas, Dugall, Doughald, Dougald (DOO-gald), Dghall (DOO-ull), Dghlas (DOOG-lass).
Douglas ? "from the dark water"; "dark river or stream" or "dark blue-green". Scotland, Ireland, and Wales all have a river of this name. Dubhghlas (DOOG-lass). *see Dougal.
Drummond ? "druid's mountain"; "at the ridge"; or from a surname based on a clan name that is derived from the name of the village of Drymen in Sterlingshire; used as a name in Scotland since the 13th C.
Duer ? "heroic".
Duff ? "dark". Dubh.
Duncan ? Gaelic Donnchadh (DOO-nuh-xuh) from Old Irish donn "brown" or "chief" + cath "warrior" = "dark-skinned warrior". Fr. a surname based on a clan name. Duncan was the name of two early Kings of the Scots: Duncan I in the 11th C. was immortalized by Shakespeare's MacBeth; Clan Donnchadh (the Robertsons) claims Donnchadh Reamhar (Duncan the Stout) as its name ancestor. Donnchadh, Donnachadh, Dunn, Dune.
Dunham ? from the Gaelic word for "brown".
Dunlop ? "muddy hill".
Dunmore ? "fortress on the hill".
Durell ? "king's doorkeeper". Dorrell, Durial, Durrell.

Eachann ? (EU-chun) "steadfast". Scottish form of Hector.
Eanruig ? "rules the home". Scottish form of Henry. Eanraig.
Ear ? derived from the Gaelic meaning "from the east".
Edan ? "fire".
Eideard ? (AE-jard) "wealthy guardian"; Gaelic form of Edward.
Eilig ? from a word meaning "from the deer pass".
Ennis ? an alternate form of Angus.
Eghann ? (YOE-wun) "youth". Gaelic spelling of Ewan.
Eonan ? (YOE-wun or YOH-nuhn) "youth"; from Old Irish name Adamnan, "little Adam". St. Adamnan (d. 704) was abbot of a monastery of Iona in Scotland; his writings contain the first mention of the Loch Ness Monster.
Esaph ? Scottish form of Joseph.
Erskine ? "from the height of the cliff" or "dweller of the top of the cliff"; from a clan name based on the name of a place on the banks of the Clyde, near Glasgow. Derivation is uncertain. Kinny, Kin.
Ervin ? (Gael) "beautiful".
Evan ? either "young warrior" or "right-handed".
Ewan ? Gaelic Eoghann (YOH-uhn) Fr. Old Irish name Eogan "born of the yew tree": eo "yew" + gein "birth" = "born of the yew tree". Traditional clan name, including Clan Campbell and Clan Chattan. Ewen of Locheil, chief of Clan Cameron, was a celebrated opponent of Oliver Cromwell. Ewen, Euen, Euan, Ewhen, Owen, anglicized as Hugh.

Faing ? "from the sheep pen". Fang.
Farquhar ? Gaelic Fearchar (FER-uh-xuhr or FER-a-char) Fr. Old Irish fer "man" + cara "friendly"; "friendly man"; "one especially dear"; "strong man". King Ferchar the Long, of Lorne (d. 697), was ancestor of the Chattan and Farquarson clans. Faarquar, Farquharson, Ferchar.
Feandan ? "from the narrow glen".
Fearghas ? (FER-uh-guhsh) "of manly strength" or "dear one"; fr. Old Irish fer "man" + gus "strength, vigor"; or "first choice". Fergus mac Eirc is considered the ancestor of the Gaels. Fergus.
Fergusson ? "son of Fergus". Ferguson.
Fife ? from a surname der. from the name of ancient kingdom in eastern Scotland. Some claim the name is from Fib, the name of one of the seven sons of Cruithne, the legendary ancestor of the Pictish race. Fyfe, Fibh.
Fingal ? from Old Irish finn "bright, fair" + gall "stranger". J. Macpherson transformed the Irish and Scottish folk hero Finn mac Cumaill into a Scottish king named Fingal in his Ossianic poems.
Fionnlagh ? (FYOOHN-ee-loo or FYON-lax) fr. Old Irish finn "bright, fair" + laoch "warrior"; "fair hero". Finlay, Finley, Findlay.
Firth ? from the placename, meanings "arm of the sea".
Forbeis ? (FOR-bish) "headstrong". Clan name fr. the Gaelic place word forba "field" + suffix of location -ais. Forbes.
Fordyce ? from a surname based on a place in Banffshire.
Frang ? (FRANG-g) form of the Teutonic name Frank, meaning "free".
Fraser ? "strawberry fields"; from French surname de Frisselle, brought to Scotland by Normans in 13th C. The French word for strawberries is "fraise", and there are strawberry plants are on the Fraser coat of arms.

Gabhran ? (GAHV-ruhn) Gaelic for "little goat"; an ancient Scottish name, borne by a grandson of Fergus mac Erc.
Gair ? from a word meaning "short". Gare.
Gavin ? "white hawk"; popular in the Middle Ages, as Gawain in England, and Gauvain in France; in Arthurian legends and literature, Gawain was one of the boldest knights of the Round Table; Gavin Dunbar was Archbishop of Glasgow and Chancellor of Scotland in the 16th C., and est'd the first National Court of Justice. Gilchrist Fr. Gaelic Gille Criosd (gil-yuh-KREE-uhst) meaning "servant of Christ"; esp. popular in the Middle Ages. Gawain, Gawen, Gaven.
Geordan ? Scottish form of Gordon.
Geordie ? (Gr) "farmer"; form of George. Seras.
Gilchrist ? modern spelling of Gille Criosd, "servant of Christ".
Gillanders ? Gaelic Gille Anndrais (gil-yuh OWN-drish), "servant of St. Andrew".
Gilleabart ? "pledge".
Gillean ? (GIL-yan) Gaelic Gilla Eoin (gil-yuh YOWN), "servant of (St.) John". The Clan Maclean (son of Gillean) takes its name from the 13th C. warrior, Gillean of the Battle Axe; Gillean is not to be confused with the English woman's name Gillian (Jillian), fr. Juliana.
Gilleasbuig ? (GEEL-yes-pick) "genuine or bold"; variant of Old German Archibald.
Gillecroids ? from the Gaelic word for "Christ-bearer" or "servant of Christ".
Gillespie ? Gaelic Gilleasbuig (gil-yuh-IS-pik) "servant of a bishop"; traditional first name among the Campbells.
Gillis ? Gaelic Gille Iosa (gil-yuh EE-uh-suh) "servant of Jesus"; traditional first name in the Hebrides.
Gillivray ? "servant of judgment".
Gleann ? (Gael) from gleann "valley"; male or female name. Glen, Glenn.
Glendan ? (Gael) place name for "settlement in the glen" or "fortress in the glen". Glendon, Glenden.
Goraidh ? from a Celtic word for "peaceful".
Gordon ? (GORSH-tuhn) from clan name based on a place name in Berwickshire, perhaps der. fr. British gor "great" + din "hill-fort"; possibly also "hero" or "from the cornered hill". Geordan, Gordie, Gordy, Grdon.
Gow ? (Gael) "a smith".
Gowan ? from Gaelic gobha "a smith"; blacksmiths were VIP's in early Celtic culture, often having an aura of magic about them. Gow, Gobha.
Graham ? from an Anglo-Saxon word for "warlike". Greum, Graeme, Gram "grain".
Grant ? (L) "great".
Greer ? from a Scottish surname, a contraction of the name Gregor.
Gregory ? (Gr) "vigilant".
Griogair ? (GRI-kuhr) Gaelic form of the name of St. Gregory of Tours, France; name was brought to Scotland by the Norman French and widely used in the Middle Ages, and meant "vigilant"; derived from greigh "a flock or herd"; all forms of this name were officially banned for most of the 17th and 18th C.'s for alleged misdeeds of some clan members. Gregor.
Gunn ? from the Norse-Viking word for "warrior"; possibly "white".

Hamish ? (HAY-mish) Gaelic form of James.
Harailt ? Scottish form of an Old Norse word for "leader".
Hearn ? shortened form of Ahearn, which means "lord of the horses".
Henson ? "Henry's son"; surname adopted as a first name. Henderson.
Home ? "from the cave". Hume.
Hugh ? (Teut) "intelligence, spirit"; English name from German root hugi "heart, mind"; traditionally used in Scotland to anglicize the Gaelic names Eoghann, Uisdeann, Aodh.

Iain ? (ee-AYN or EE-an) "God's gracious gift"; Gaelic form of John. Ian, Iaian, Ianv.
Innes ? from Gaelic word for "island"; first a surname and clan name, then first name, male or female.
Iomhair ? (EE-uh-var) from the Teutonic name Ivor, "archer". Ivar, Iver, Ivor.
Ivar ? from Gaelic form, Iomhair (EE-uh-vuhr), of the Old Norse Ivarr, meaning "yew tree army"; traditional first name in clan Campbell of Strachur, and also the source of the surname MacIver. Ivor.

Jamie ? (H) "the supplanter"; Scottish variation of James and Seumas.
Jocelin ? Dim. form of Breton saint's name, Josse. Norman French brought to Scotland in the 12th C. Joselin, Joslin.
Jock ? (H) "the supplanter"; older Scottish form of James and Seumas. Jack, Seoc.
Ein ? Scottish verstion of Jonathan. Johnathan, Jonathon.

Kade ? "wetlands".
Keddy ? Scottish form of Adam.
Keir ? from a clan name, der. from the Old Irish ciar "dark".
Keith ? as a personal name it means "the battle place"; from a surname, based on the place name, Ceiteach, in East Lothian.
Kendrew ? Scottish form of Andrew.
Kendrick ? from a word meaning "son of Henry"; or "royal chieftain".
Kennan ? "little Ken".
Kennedy ? from Old Irish name Cennetig: cenn "head" + etig "ugly"; ; or "helmeted chief"; mostly associated with Ireland, it has been used consistently in Scotland as a family name and first name since the 12th C.
Kentigern ? from Old Irish cenn "head" + tigern "lord". The 6th C. St. Kentigern is the patron saint of Glasgow; he was said to be the son of Owein ap* Urien, an early Welsh hero of the Old North.
Kenzie ? "wise leader"; related to the clan name Mackenzie.
Kermichil ? from a Gaelic word meaning "from Michael's fortress".
Kincaid ? "battle chief".
Kinnon ? "fair-born".
Kirk ? Scottish word for "church". Kerk.
Kyle ? from a surname based on the Gaelic word caol "narrow", the name of a strait in Ayrshire.

Lachlan ? "belligerant"; from Lachlann (LAKH-luhn or LAX-luhn) a Gaelic word formerly used to designate the "land of the Vikings" or "land of lakes or fjords"; the Maclachlans take their name from Lachlan Mor (Big Lachlan) a chief who lived near Loch Fryne in the 13th C. Lachlann, Laochailan.
Lailoken ? name of a Scottish prophet who was driven partially mad by his gift; some author's claim Merlin's story was based on his life.
Laird ? "wealthy landowner".
Lawren ? "crowned with laurel". Lawrence.
Leith ? "broad river". Leathan.
Lennox ? "with many elms" or "from the field of elm trees".
Leod ? Norse-Viking name adopted by Scots, meaning "ugly". The Clan MacLeod claims the Viking Chief Leod as their ancestor.
Leslie ? Poss. fr. Celtic lis "court" + celyn "holly"; possibly "(from the) gray fortress" or "small meadow". Usu. spelled Lesley for a woman, Leslie for a man. Lesley.
Logan ? from Gaelic place word lag "hollow" + dim. suffix -an; "from the little hollow". Logan is used as the name of several places in Scotland, and has been a surname since the 12th C. and a very popular name in recent years.
Lorne ? from a place name in Argyll; Loarn was the name of one of the three sons of the legendary first Gael to arrive in Scotland from Ireland.
Lulach ? (LOO-luhx) An old Scottish royal name, meaning "little calf" in Gaelic, borne by the stepson of Macbeth, who lived in the 11th C.
Lundy ? (Scottish) place name for "grove near the island. " Lundie.
Luthias ? "famous warrior".
Lyall ? "loyal".

Mac ? "son of..."; used as a nickname for names beginning with Mac or Mc. Mack, Max.
Macadam ? "son of Adam".
Macaulay ? "son of righteousness"; from a surname derived fr. the first name Aulay "son of Aulay".
Macdonald ? "Son of Donald"; an important clan name, often used in Scotland as a first name.
Machar -"plain". Machair.
Maelcoluim ? from Old Irish mael "devotee" + Colm, fr. Latin columba "dove"; or "servant of St. Columba". Colm Cille was the Irish name of the most important early St. in Scotland, known also by the Latin name Columba, who founded the monastery on Iona, and converted the Pictish kings of Scotland; three medieval kings of the Scots bore the name Malcolm. Malcolm.
Manius ? form of Norse-Viking Magnus, meaning "great". Manus.
Maoilios ? Scottish form of Myles.
Maolmuire ? "servant of Mary"; or "dark-skinned".
Mark ? Marc.
Mrtainn ? (MAHRSH-teen or MAHR-shtan) "warlike"; Gaelic form of Martin.
Mata ? Scottish form of Matthew.
Micheil ? (MEECH-yell or MEE-hyel) "who is like God"; Gaelic form of Micheal.
Mirren ? Modern form of the name of 6th C. St. Meadhran, who was active in Strathclydel; Mirren is the patron saint of football.
Moncreiffe ? "from the hill of the sacred bough".
Montgomery ? Name of a Scottish clan descended from Robert de Montgomerie; name comes from a French name which in turn is based on a German name, thus it contains the French mont "hill" and the German guma "man" + ric "power".
Morgan ? "sea warrior" or "from the sea".
Morven ? from a Gaelic word meaning "mariner". Morvin.
Muir ? (MYOOR) A surname based on the Gaelic place name muir "a moor" or "marshland".
Murdoch ? (Murdo-archaic) "sea protector" or "sea fighter". Murdo, Murchadh.
Muirfinn ? "dweller by the shining sea".
Mungo ? Nickname of Kentigern, patron saint of Glasgow, from Old Irish mo "my" + cu "hound, wolf", also possibly "amiable"; long used as a man's first name.
Munro ? from clan name Mac An Rothaich, derived fr. the Gaelic name Rothach meaning "a person from Ro". The Munros are descendants of a family that came from a place near the river Roe in Derry, Ireland. Monroe, Monro, Munroe.
Murchadh ? (MOOR-uh-choo or MOOR-uhx) from Old Irish muir "sea" + cath "warrior"; also possibly "wealthy sailor", "sea protector" or "sea fighter". Murdo, Murdoch, Murtagh, Murtaugh.
Murry ? "sailor" or "man of the sea"; from a clan name. MacMurray, Moray, Murry, Morogh.

Nab ? from a Gaelic word for "abbot".
Nairn ? "river with alder trees".
Naomhin ? (NUH-veen) fr. naomh "saint". This is a traditional first name in Galloway and Ayreshire. Nevin.
Nathair ? from the Celtic word nathdrack "snake".
Naughton ? "pure". Nachton, Nechtan.
Nealcail ? from Gaelic words meaning "victorious people".
Niall ? (NEEL or NYEE-all) An Old Irish name, prob. derived from nel "cloud"; or "champion". Clan MacNeill traces its ancestry to Anrothan, an Irish prince who married a Scottish princess in the 11th C. Anrothan was descended from Irish high king, Niall Naighiallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages), who was claimed as ancestors also by the Irish O'Neill's.
Neacal ? (NEK-uhl) "victory of the people". Nicholas, Nicol, Niocal (NIK-ul).
Niels ? "champion"; from Niall. Neil.

Oidhche ? from a word meaning "night".
Ossian ? (UH-sheen) from the Old Irish name Oisin "little deer or fawn". This character of Irish legend was transformed into a Scottish hero in J. Macpherson's Ossianic poems.

Pdruig ? (PAH-dreek or PA-trik ) "noble"; the ancient origin meaning translates to "stone" or "anchor stone". Scottish form of the Irish name Padraig (PAH-dreek), and English Patrick. Pdraig, Pahdraig, Padyn, Paton, Padan.
Parlan ? Gaelic form of Old Irish name Partholon. This name is the source of the surnames Macfarland and Macfarlane.
Parthaln ? Scottish Gaelic form of Bartholomew.
Payton ? (L) "noble"; dim. of Patrick. Paton, Peyton.
Peadair ? (PED-dur or PAY-tuhr) "(the) stone"; Gaelic form of Peter. Peadar.
Perth ? "thornbush" or "thicket".
Pl ? (PAHL) "little"; Gaelic form of Paul.
Pony ? "small horse".

Rae ? from an Old French word meaning "king".
Raghnall ? (REU-ull or RUHLL) "wise power"; Scottish form of Teutonic Ronald.
Raibeart ? (RAB-burt or RAH-bercht) "of shining fame"; Gaelic form of Robert. Clan Robertson takes its name from Robert Riach (Grizzly Robert) who lived in the 15th C. Raibert; nicknames are Rab, Rabbie.
Ranald ? from Gaelic Raghnall (RUHLL), from Norse name Rognvaldr "power, might". A traditional name among the men of the MacDonald clan. Ronald.
Rob Roy ? anglicized form of Rob Ruadh, "red Rob".
Ronald ? (Teut) "wise power" or "king's advisor"; form of Ranald. Ronal, Ronnold, Ranald, Raghnall.
Ronan ? from Old Irish ron "seal" + dim. suffix -an. An early St. Ronan, bishop of Kilmaronen in Lennox, was said to have driven out the devil out of the valley of Innerleithen. Renan, Ronat.
Ronson ? "son of Ronald". Ronaldson.
Rory ? Gaelic Ruairidh (ROO-uh-ree) from Gaelic ruadh "red".
Roslin ? (Gael) "little redhead".
Ross ? from Gaelic place word ros "upland, promontory". Ross has been used as a first name in Scotland since the 12th C. Rosse, Rossell.
Rosse ? (Gael) "headland". Rossell.
Roy ? (ScGael) from the Galeic word ruadh "red".
Ruairidh ? (RO-urree) Scottish form of Teutonic name Roderick, "famous ruler". Ruairdh (same pronun.).
Ryan ? (Gael) from a Gaelic word meaning "little king; strong".

Sandy ? "defender of man". Nickname for Alexander.
Scott ? "a Scotsman" or "from Scotland". Scot.
Scrymgeour ? "fighter".
Seras ? (SHAW-russ) Scottish form of George, "farmer".
Seumas ? (SHAY-muhs) "the supplanter" or "substitute"; Gaelic form of James. See also Hamish, derived from the genitive case of Seumas.
Sholto ? from Gaelic sioltaich "propagator". A traditional first name among the Douglases.
Simon ? "listener"; Hebrew name long used in Scotland. Associated with Clan Fraser. The chief of Clan Fraser of Lovat is called MacShimi "Son of Simon". Simeon, Symon; nicknames include Sim, Sym, Syme.
Somairhle ? (SOH-uhr-lyuh), from Old Norse summarliethi, "one who goes forth in the summer" (i.e. a Viking), or "a Viking raider". Anglicized as Sorley. Vikings would spend autumn and winter on the Isle of Man, then raid nearby Coasts of Scotland and Ireland in spring and summer. 11th C. chief of Clan Donald, Somerled, Lord of the Isles was half-Gaelic, half-Norse and ruled the Isle of Man, southern Hebrides and Argyll. Somerled, Sorley, Sorely, Samuel.
Stewart ? (A.S.) "caretaker or steward". Originally an occupational name, borne by keepers of the Scottish royal house. Later changed to a hereditary family name, then became a royal name as the House of Stuart ruled Scotland in 1371, and England from 1603-1714. Occasionally used as a girl's first name. Stiubhart, Stuart.
Stratton ? "river valley town".
Struan ? (STROO-uhn) Prob. from Gaelic struan "stream". Once a common name among the men of Clan Donnchaidh (Robertsons), who owned lands of Struan in Perthshire.
Sutherland ? "southern land"; Norse-Viking name used by the Scots.

Tavish ? "a twin"; form of Thomas. Tavis, Tavey, Tevis, Tevish, Tamnais.
Tearlach ? (TCHAR-lokh or CHAR-luhx) Gaelic "well-shaped", "full-grown" or "manly". Popular name among the Stewarts. Often anglicized as the unrelated name Charles, which means "strong and manly".
Todd ? "fox".
Tmas ? (TO-mass or TAW-muhs) "twin"; Gaelic form of Thomas. Tamhas, Tmas, Tamlane (archaic).
Tormod ? (TOR-ro-mit) "from the north"; Scots-Gaelic form of Teutonic Norman.
Torquil ? "Thor's kettle"; from Gaelic Torcaill (THOR-kil) fr. Norse name based on the god Thor. Torquil was the name of the founder of Clan MacLeod of Lewis, and a popular name for the men of that clan. Torcuil, Torkill.
Tremaine ? "house of stone".
Tyree ? from a Gaelic word meaning "island dweller". Tyrae, Tyrai, Tyrea.

Uilleam ? (OOL-yam or OOL-yuhm) "resolute soldier"; Gaelic form of William, brought to Scotland in the Middle Ages by Norman French companions of William the Conquerer. Liam is the Irish form of the name and popular in Scotland also.
Uisdean ? (OOSH-jan or OOS-juhn) "intelligent", "spirit"; Gaelic form of Hugh, also possibly from Austin and/or Augustine.
Urquhart ? Scottish form of Old English name meaning "from the fount on the knoll".

Wallace ? Origin is Anglo-Saxon word walas or wealas "a Celt" or "a stranger", source also of the words Wales and Welsh. First used as a surname in the border regions of Scotland, then used as a first name in memory of national hero William Wallace, who was executed by British authorities in 1305. Wallis.
Wyndham ? "village near the winding road".


Celtic Female Names of Scotland

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Africa ? formerly used in Scotland as anglicized form of Gaelic Oighrig, but use is nearly obsolete.
Aggie ? Scottish pet form of Agnes and Agatha.
Agnes ? from a Greek word meaning "pure" or "gentle"; after St. Agnes. Segna is a form of Agnes spelled backwards, from an old Scottish custom of backspelling. Ireland has traditionally used it as a translation of Una. Aignis, Una, Aggie, Nesta, Nessa, Nessie, Segna.
Ailean ? (AY-luhn) from the Old Irish word ail "noble" + dim. an. Aileana, Alana, Aila (AY-lah).
Aileen ? (AY-leen)(Gr) "light". Scottish variant spelling of Eileen.
Aili ? (AY-lee)(OGer) "noble, kind". Alison, Allie.
Ailie ? Scottish pet form of Aileen, or anglicized spelling of Eilidh.
Ailios ? "noble, kind". Alice.
Ailis ? (AY-less) "truthful"; form of Alice. Ailie, Alissa, Lissa.
Ailsa ? (AYL-suh) modern Scottish name from Ailsa Craig, a rocky islet in the Clyde estuary off Ayrshire coast. Derived from Old Norse-Viking Alfisigesy "island off Alfsigr"; composed of alf "supernatural being, elf" + sigi "victory". Possible anglicization of Ealasaid. Ailsa Craig is known in Gaelic as Allasa, or Creag Ealasaid. Form of Elsa from Hebrew Elizabeth, "consecrated to God".
Ainsley ? (AYN-slee) "one's own meadow". Ainslee.
Akira ? "anchor".
Alana ? (ah-lah-nah) Fem. of Ailean (Alan). Alanna, Alannah.
Alba ? (Scot) ancient name for Scotland; not very popular now.
Alexina ? (aleck-seen-ah) Scottish (Highlands) elaborate form of pet name Alexandra. Alexine.
Alickina ? feminine form of male Alick (Alec).
Aline ? (AY-leen) anglicized form of Scots-Gaelic word lainn, and (Irish) lainn "lovely".
Alison ? popular Scottish form of medieval Norman dim. Alice by adding the suffix -on. Allison, Alyson, Allyson. Pet forms Allie, Ally.
Allina ? (AH-leen-ah) Scottish variant of Alina.
Alpina ? form of male name Alpin; derives from Latin albinus "white" or "fair".
Andra ? (AN-drah) "strong and courageous".
Andreana ? (AN-dree-ah-nah) "strong" or "courageous"; fem. form of Andrew. Andrina.
Anice ? "grace"; Scottish form of Ann/e.
Annag ? Scottish Gaelic pet form of Anna.
Annella ? (ah-nell-ah) elaborated Scottish form of Anne, common in the Highlands.
Annis ? Scottish medieval vernacular form of Agnes. Annys, Annice.
Annot ? (H) "light".
Annys ? Scottish, variant of Annis, in a deliberate archaic spelling.
Arabella ? Scottish, uncertain origin, probably an alteration of An(n)abella. Arabel (now rare), Orabel.
Artis ? "bear"; fem. form of Arthur.
Athdara ? "successful spear-warrior"; fem. form of Adair. Adaira.
Athol ? transferred use of the name of a Perthshire district, seat of the dukes of Atholl. The placename is thought to derive from the Gaelic ath Fodla "new Ireland". Atholl, Athole.
Audrey ? "noble strength". Audra.

Barabal ? Scots-Gaelic form of Barbara, from Latin "foreign woman", "barbarian" or "stranger". Barabell (BA-ra-bul).
Beasag ? Nickname for Elizabeth. Bessie.
Beathag ? (BEH-hack) "life" or "servant of god"; fem. of Beatha. The same word that's the root for the word that becomes Beth in MacBethand is anglicized as Benjamin when given to a boy. Bethoc was the name of an 11th C. queen, daughter of Malcolm II. Anglicized as Rebecca or a child could be names Sophia instead of Beathag or Rebecca. Beth, Betha, Bathag (BAY-hak).
Beathas ? (BEH-hahs) Gaelic name that means "wise".
Beitidh ? Nickname for Elizabeth. Betty.
Beitiris ? (bet-er-eesh) Scottish form of Beatrice; possibly also Batrisch (ba-treesh).
Blair ? "a dweller on the plains". Blaire, Blayre.
Bonnie ? (L) "pretty, sweet" or "beautiful"; "good, fair of face". Bonny.
Bradana ? Gaelic name meaning "salmon".
Brae ? (BRAY) "hillside or slope".
Brenda ? originated in Shetland Islands, fr. Norse brand for "sword". Name of heroine of Sir Walter Scott's The Pirate.
Bridget ? (BRI-jit) "strength"; Scottish version of the Irish goddess Brighid (BREED). Bride, Brghde.

Cadha ? Celtic name meaning "from the steep place".
Cailleach ? (CAL-yech) from the original name for Scotland, Caledonia, which was taken from the name of the goddess. The Cailleach Beine Bric, or Veiled One, represented the Crone aspect of the Goddess, said to reborn every Samhain and turned into a stone on Beltane. Cailic.
Cairistona ? (KAR-ish-tchee-unna) "Christian". Gaelic form of Christine/a.
Cameron ? "crooked nose". Camera.
Catrona ? (ka-TREE-uh-nuh or KAT-ree-unna) "pure". Gaelic form of C/Katherine.
Ceit ? Nickname for C/Katherine. Kate.
Ceitidh ? Nickname for C/Katherine. Ceiteag, Katie.
Criosaidh ? Nickname for Christine/a. Chrissie.
Christel ? variant of name Christina. Christal.
Ciorstag ? (KER-stuhk or KER-nyuhx) "pure"; Gaelic nickname for Christine or Catherine. Anglicized as Kirstie, Kirsty. Ciorstaidh, Catriona.
Claire ? Sorcha.
Coira ? "seething pool". Cora.
Coleen ? Gaelic word for "girl". Colina, Colleen.
Constance ? (L) "constant". Connie.
Cullodena ? "from the broken, mossy ground"; personal name from the placename Culloden. Cullodina.

Dallas ? (Gael) "wise"; placename of a northern village in Scotland.
Daracha ? "from the oak".
Davina ? "beloved"; Scottish form of David. Dava, Vina, Davonna, Davon, Davonda.
Deirdre ? from Irish-Gaelic name for "sorrow". The tragic heroine in Irish tales who fled to Scotland with her lover Naoise to escape King Conchobar. When they returned to Ireland, Naoise was murdered and she died on his grave.
Dervorgilla ? From Old Irish Der Bforgaill: der "daughter" + Forgall, a god-name. Mother of John Balliol, King of Scots. She founded Balliol College, Oxford, in 1250. Dervla.
Diana ? (L) "goddess of the moon"; a Roman goddess of the moon, but was also well known in Scotland.
Dorbhail ? (JIR-vil) "gift of God". Dorothy.
Doilidh ? Dolly.
Dolina ? fem. form of Donald from Old Irish words domnan "world," and gal "valor". Dona, Donaldina, Dolly, Doileag, Dollag (DAW-lukh).
Donalda ? (Gael) "world mighty".

Ealasaid ? (ee-AH-luh-sich or YALL-u-satch) "consecrated to god"; Scots form of Elizabeth. Elsbeth, Elspet, Elsie, Elspeth, Elspie, Elspy.
Eara ? (ee-ahr-ah) "from the east". Earie.
Edana ? (EH-dah-nah) "little fire", 6th C. Irish-born St. Edana, or Medana, founded convent at Maiden Castle. Legend says she held the veil from St. Patrick himself. City of Edinburgh formerly bore her name, dun Edana "Edana's castle. "
Edina ? "from Edinburgh"; placename modified into a personal name. Edine, Edeen.
Effie ? "good repute"; Scottish version of Euphemia, old spelling Oighrigh (II-rix). Popular until the 19th C.
Eilidh ? (EH-lee) "light". Helen, Ellen.
Eiric ? "ever powerful"; Scottish version of Eric, taken from the Norse. Eirica, Erica, Ericka, Erika.
Erskina ? "from the top of the cliff".
Euphemia ? (YOO-fee-me-ah) Effie, Oighrig, Eppy, Eppie.
Evanna ? "right-handed". Evina.

Fearchara ? (ScotsGael) "dear one".
Fenella ? "white shoulder"; Gaelic form of Irish Fionnuala, from Old Irish finn "bright, fair" + guala "shoulders". Name of heroine in Sir W. Scott's Peveril of the Peak.
Fia ? (FEE-ah) "dark of peace".
Fiona ? (FEE-oh-nah) "white" or "fair"; fem. form of Irish Finn or Fionn. Name created by 19th C. writer William Sharp when used as his pen name, Fiona MacLeod.
Flraidh ? (FLOH-ree or FLAW-ree) "flower"; Gaelic form of English Flora. Flora MacDonald helped Bonnie Prince Charlie escape to Isle of Skye after his defeat at Culloden, after which Floraidh became a popular Highland name. Flora is an anglicization of MacDonald's Gaelic name, Fionnuala. Flora, Floraigh, Floraidh.
Forba ? fem. version of clan name Forbeis. Forbia.
Fyfa ? fem. form of Fyfe, the name of an ancient kingdom in easter Scotland. The name Fyfe is believed to have come from Fib, name of one of the seven sons of Cruithne, ancestor of the Picts.

Gail ? "strong" or "stranger". Gael, Gayle.
Gara ? "short". Garia, Gaira.
Gavina ? "white hawk". Gavenia.
Gillian ? (JILL-ee-an) "youthful". Jill, Jillian.
Giorsal ? (GI-ruh-shuhl) Gaelic form of Grace.
Glen ? From Gaelic place word gleann "valley". Glenn.
Glenna ? fem. form of Glen(n), from Gaelic gleann "valley".
Glynis ? "a narrow valley".
Gordania ? (GORSH-tuhn-a) fem. form of Gordon, from clan name from British gor "great" + din "hill-fort". Gordana.
Gormla ? (gohr-UHM-luh) Fr. Old Irish Gormflaith: gorm "splendid" + flaith "sovereignty".
Greer ? "vigilant, alert, watchful"; Scottish form of Gregory or a Scottish surname. Grear.
Grizel ? "gray battle-maid"; Scottish adaption of Norse Griselda. Grisel, Grizzel, Grace (anglicized form).
Gunna ? "warrior battle-maid"; Scottish version of Norse-Viking name Gunnar.

Heather ? (OE) "heather"; Scottish name derived from the plant heather.

Ilisa ? "truthful"; Scottish version of Elisa. Ilysa.
Ina ? (EE-na) Originally a nickname for names ending in -ina, i.e. Georgina, Jamesina, Thomasina, Ina became popular in its own right.
Inghean ? "the god's daughter; Scottish fem. form of the Norse-Viking god Ing. Inghinn.
Innes ? Fr. Gaelic word for "island". Was first a surname and clan name, then first name.
Iona ? From the name of the island in the Hebrides where St. Columba founded a monastery in 563.
Irvette ? (O.E.) "seafriend".
Iseabail ? (I-shi-bel or EE-sha-bal) "consecrated to god"; Scots version of Isabel. Isobel, Isobelle, Isobell, Isabel, Isabelle, Isabell, Ishbel. Pet forms: Bel, Bell, Bella, Belle, Ella, Ib, Ibbie, Isa, Sib, Tib, Tibbie, Tibby.
Isla ? Name of the Scottish island, Islay; also a river in Scotland.
Isobel ? (H) "consecrated to God"; from Elizabeth. Isabel, Ishbel, Iseabail.

Jean ? (H) "god is gracious" or "god's gracious gift"; fem. form of John. Janet, Joan.
Jennifer ? (Celt) "white wave". From Welsh Gwenwhyfar (Guinevere).
Jinny ? Scottish version of Jennifer, "white wave".
Jocelin ? "joyful"; Dim. form of Breton saint's name, Josse. Norman French brought to Scotland in the 12th C. Jocelyn.

Keita ? "woods or an enclosed place". Keiti.
Kelsi ? "sea harbor"; Scottish version of Chelsea.
Kenna ? "handsome"; fem. form of Kenneth or Kenny (see Coinneach and Cinead). Ceana.
Kentigerna ? From Old Irish cenn "head" + tigern "lord". Name of an Irish queen who traveled to Scotland with her son St. Fillan. She lived as a recluse on the island of Inchebroida in Loch Lomond, where a church is dedicated to her.
Kenzie ? "light-skinned'; personal name from a clan name.
Kyla ? (kI-lah) "comely or lovely". Kla (possible original Gaelic spelling).

Lainie ? "serves St. John". Leana.
Lair ? "mare". Lara, Laria.
Laurie ? "crowned with laurel"; from Laura. Laure.
Lioslaith ? Poss. fr. Celtic lis "court" + celyn "holly"; also "gray fortress". Lesley, Leslie. Usually spelled Lesley for a woman, Leslie for a man.
Leslie ? (Gael) "the gray castle" or "the small meadow".
Lilas ? "lily"; form of Lillian.
Lilias ? (LI-lee-as) Gaelic form of Lily, fr. Latin lilium. Lileas, Lilidh (li-LEE).
Lorna ? "crowned with laurel". Made up name by Scottish writer R.D. Blackmore for his novel's heroine in Lorna Doone (1869). Logical fem. form of Lorne.

Machara ? "plain".
Mae ? (H) "bitter". Mili, May.
Magaidh ? "a pearl"; from Margaret. Maggie, Maisie (archaic).
Mili ? (MAH-lee or MAW-lee) "bitter"; Gaelic nickname for Mary. Molly.
Mairead ? (MAY-ret or MA-ee-rat) "a pearl"; Gaelic form of Margaret. Popularized by St. Margaret in the Middle Ages. St. Margaret was born to the English royal house of Wessex, married Malcolm III, King of Scots. Mother of three kings as well.
Miri ? (MAH-ree or MAW-ree) "bitter"; Gaelic form of Mary. Mairi Mhor nan Oran (Big Mary of the Songs) was a 19th C. Gaelic poet. Moire, Muire.
Maisie ? "a pearl"; version of Margaret.
Malmuira ? "dark-skinned".
Malvina ? "armored chief". Invented by Scottish writer James Macpherson in his Ossianic poems. Napolean originally named the Falkland Islands off S. America St. Malo; becoming "Malouines" and being that the "u" and "v" are interchangeable at the time and for euphonic reasons, Malvines/Malvinas prevailed. Malvi.
Marcail ? "a pearl"; version of Margaret/Marjorie/Marjory.
Marion ? "bitter"; version of Mary. Mae, May, Mr.
Mariota ? Dim. of Mary. Mariota was the name of the wife of the great Donald, Lord of the Isles.
Marsaili ? (MAHR-suh-lee or MAR-sally) "a pearl"; version of Margaret/Marjorie/Marjory.
Maureen ? "great". Moreen.
Moibeal ? "loveable".
Moira ? (Celt) "great".
Moireach ? "great one".
Molly ? (H) "bitter".
Mrag ? (MAW-rack, MOHR-ahk or MOR-ack) "blind" or "bitter"; from Old Irish mor "big". Classic Gaelic woman's name; form of Sheila. Marion, Sarah "princess".
Morven ? (Morvyn) Poss. fr. Gaelic mor "big" + bhein "peak". Name of mountains in Aberdeenshire and in Caithness. Also designates all of NW Scotland. Morvyn.
Muira ? (MOOR-ah or MOOR-eh) from Gelic words muir "moor". Muire.
Muireall ? (MOOR-uh-yel) Fr. Old Irish muir "sea" + gel "bright, shining". Name of an heiress of the Thane of Cawdor, who was kidnapped by Sir John Campbell in 1510, and became the ancestress of the Campbells of Cawdor. Anglicized Muriel.
Muirne ? (MOOR-nyuh) Old Irish word for "beloved", and name of character in J. Macpherson's Ossianic poems. Morna.
Murron ? (MOHR-in) Scots version of Irish Muirrean, from Old Irish muir "sea", may also mean "sea-white" or "sea-fair", and an ancient feminine version of Murphy. Muirrean, Muireann.

Nairne ? "lives at the alder tree river". Nairna.
Nansaidh ? "grace". Nancy (H).
Nathaira ? "snake". Nathara.
Nessa ? Scottish nickname for Agnes used as a name by itself also. Nessa is also an Old Irish name.
Nichneven ? a Samhain witch-goddess also called "divine" and "brilliant". Also known in the Middle Ages as: Dame Habonde, Abundia, Satia, Bensozie, Zobiana, Herodiana. Folk takes say she rides through the night with her followers on Samhain Eve.
Nighean ? a Gaelic dialect name meaning "young woman". Nighinn.

Oighrig ? (EU-ee-rick) "pleasant speech"; from Euphemia. Effie.
Osla ? Name from Shetland Islands. Gaelic form of Norse name Aslaug, "god-consecrated".

Paisley ? personal name taken from the patterned fabric made in Paisley, Scotland.
Payton ? "pastor, guardian".
Peigi ? (PAEG-ee) "a pearl"; version of name Peggy, a nickname for Margaret.

Raoghnailt ? "innocence of a lamb"; version of Rachel (H). Raonaid (REUN-eetch).
Rhona ? (ROH-nah) name of a Scottish island, from Norse hrauen "rough" + ey "island"; other sources say "powerful, mighty".
Robena ? "robin". Robina.
Rossalyn ? "a cape or promontory".
Rowena ? (Celt) "white mane".
Rut ? Ruth.

Saraid ? (SAHR-ich) Fr. Old Irish sar "best, noble". Sarait, daughter of legendary Irish monarch, Conn of the Hundred Battles, was considered the ancestress of the Scottish kings.
Scota ? an Underworld goddess who gave her name to Scotland; she was the greatest teacher of martial arts, and was a warrior woman and prophetess who lived on the Isle of Sky. Scotta, Scotia, Scathach.
Seasaidh ? (SHAY-see) "god is gracious"; Scottish dim. of Janet; popularized by Lowland Scots poet Robert Burns. Jessie.
Seonag ? (SHAW-nack) "god is gracious"; version of Joan.
Senaid ? (SHAW-nich) "god is gracious"; version of Janet. Seona (SHAW-nuh).
Sheila ? "blind"; from Cecila. Shela ("musical").
Sile ? (SHEE-luh) Gaelic form of Latin Cecilia; became popular in Scotland in early 20th C. Sheila, Sheelagh, Sheelah.
Sleas ? (SHEE-luss) "youthful one". Julia, Celia "blind".
Sima ? (SHEE-mah) "listener" or "treasure, prize".
Sne ? (SHEE-nuh) "God's gracious gift"; version of Jean/Jane. Sheena, Sheenagh, Sheenah, Shena.
Siofra ? word for a "changeling" or "little elf". It's also used as a term for a precocious child. It's use as a name is modern (20th century).
Siubhan ? "praised".
Sisaidh ? (SHOO-see) "graceful lily"; version of Susan.
Skena ? Gaelic name adopted from the placename Skene.
Sorcha ? (SOHR-uh-xuh) Fr. Old Irish sorchae "bright, radiant".
Struana ? "from the stream".

Tavia ? "eighth"; version of Octavia. Teva.
Tavie ? "twin"; version of Tavish.
Tira ? "land". Tyra.
Torra ? "from the castle".

Una ? Fr. Old Irish uan "lamb". Often anglicized in Scotland as Agnes, which means "lamb" in Greek.

Vanora ? "white wave". Venora.
Vika ? "from the creek".

Wynda ? "from the narrow or winding passage".

PMEmail PosterUsers WebsiteMy Photo Album               
Top
C Dubh 
Posted: 10-Jan-2004, 02:52 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 321
Joined: 15-Dec-2003
ZodiacRowan

Realm: Alba

male





Aye thank you Faileas for the lesson. Faileas has very good Gaelic, she is studying Gaelic at Sbhal Mr Ostaig in the Island of Skye and I believe one of her teachers Celtic-Rose is Iain Taylor, co author of your new book. I hope i got that right, but i'm sure i've 'heard' her mention it. Wow that's a lot of names Celtic-Rose. Good to see all the meanings. Have a good night everyone. beer_mug.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
DesertRose 
Posted: 11-Jan-2004, 09:58 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 6,913
Joined: 09-Nov-2003
ZodiacAlder

Realm: The desert of Arizona

female





Halo Cu Dubh!

Yes, my book is from Iian Taylor and it is very good. I admit that I haven't spent much time in it as I have been doing other things. Hubby has been home so I have not listened to my tapes yet either! Bad me.. angel_not.gif

I enjoy seeing you all write it and learn from you all. In the meantime, I keep trying to review the first chapter!

Mar sin leibh!
PMEmail PosterUsers WebsiteMy Photo Album               
Top
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Reply to this topic Quick ReplyStart new topicStart Poll


 








Celtic RadioTM broadcasts through Live365.com and StreamLicensing.com which are officially licensed under SoundExchange, ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and SOCAN.
2014 Celtic Radio Network, Highlander Radio, Celtic Moon, Celtic Dance, Ye O' Celtic Pub and Celt-Rock-Radio.
All rights and trademarks reserved. Read our Privacy Policy.
Celtic Graphics 2014, Cari Buziak


Link to CelticRadio.net!
Link to CelticRadio.net
View Broadcast Status and Statistics!

Best Viewed With IE 8.0 (1680 x 1050 Resolution), Javascript & Cookies Enabled.


[Home] [Top]

Celtic Hearts Gallery | Celtic Mates Dating | My Celtic Friends | Celtic Music Radio | Family Heraldry | Medival Kingdom | Top Celtic Sites | Web Celt Blog | Video Celt