Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )
   Mobile App






Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> Contemporary News From The Highlands, Local & regional news from Scotland
Bookmark and Share
englishmix 
Posted: 31-Jan-2010, 02:06 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Weather brings chaos to Mearns
Commuters hit by lengthy tailbacks

The Press and Journal, Published: 30/01/2010


COMMUTERS faced travel chaos yesterday as parts of the main A90 south of Aberdeen ground to a standstill. Accidents on the A90 Dundee-Aberdeen road left commuters stuck in tailbacks stretching from Portlethen to the Muchalls junction in the morning, with further tailbacks south of Stonehaven heading towards Laurencekirk.

The northbound jam was caused by a car which had slid into a barrier close to the Portlethen slip road. The carriageway was reduced to one lane at times as the vehicle was recovered. Police said they had attended “a spate” of accidents across snow-hit Aberdeenshire throughout the day.

Commuters faced more misery after another accident at about 3.50pm. A 10-vehicle collision on the A90 near the Lumgair junction, near Stonehaven, caused 2 The ambulance service said there had been one minor injury as a result.

Parts of the dual-carriageway were reduced to one lane due to drifting snow. A spokeswoman for Bear Scotland, the agency responsible for trunk roads, moved to reassure drivers that teams had been deployed to plough and treat the A90 dual-carriageway “around the clock”.

Teams are preparing for the possibility of further snowfall over the weekend, an Aberdeenshire Council spokesman said.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 01-Feb-2010, 01:17 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







'Massive thud then whole flat shook'
By Jackie MacKenzie
The North Star, Published: 28 January, 2010


A DINGWALL woman this week described how her block of flats shook when a passenger train derailed as it approached the town's railway station. More than 70 passengers escaped serious injury after the two-coach train came off the rails around 100 yards south of Dingwall station on Friday evening.

Several passengers had been getting ready to alight at Dingwall when the front unit of the Inverness to Ardgay train began bumping along the sleepers before grinding to a halt. Rosemary Shaw, who lives in Cambrai Court, said: "I live in a top floor flat and I was watching TV around 5.45pm when I just heard this tremendous thud and I knew something horrible had happened. I thought there had been some kind of explosion. I got a fright because the noise was so loud and I actually felt the whole flat shake with the vibration. I looked out of the window and I could see the train about 70 yards away to the right hand side of the flats with the engine running and the lights on. Everything seemed calm and I couldn't work out what had happened. I think the noise must have been the train coming to a shuddering stop."

Ms Shaw, a home economics teacher at Alness Academy, said: "It was then that I heard a chorus of sirens and saw flashing lights. I was absolutely amazed at the response time of the services. They were so quick it was absolutely brilliant. The police were first on the scene. There were three fire engines outside my flat and ambulances. The firemen cut the fence along the railway line and I heard someone on a radio saying to take the passengers into Cambrai Court.

"First ScotRail staff were also on the scene very quickly. Everyone was so organised. I know they're trained for emergency responses but it was still very impressive."

One woman who was slightly injured was taken to hospital as a precaution after the accident but nobody else was hurt. Ms Shaw said: "I was so relieved to hear that nobody had been badly hurt because some of the passengers said they had been standing up at the time, waiting to alight. It's just a blessing that the train was going so slowly."

A British Transport Police spokesman said: "Both carriages remained upright and the rear wheels of the second carriage remained on the track. The train was travelling at about 20mph." He added: "Inquiries into the cause of the incident are on-going and the Rail Accident Investigation Branch and Office of the Rail Regular have been informed."

[email protected]
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 01-Feb-2010, 01:25 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







County stun leaders at Dens
Dundee 0, Ross County 1

The North Star, Published: 01 February, 2010


PAUL Lawson's wonder strike sunk Irn Bru Division One leaders Dundee at Dens on Saturday – and made Ross County their main rivals for the title. The former Celtic youth midfielder's deflected long-range shot on the stroke of half-time was the only goal of the game and left the Dark Blues fearing a potential challenge from Dingwall.

The result moves Derek Adams' side six points behind the Taysiders – but, vitally, with three games in hand. The win was thoroughly deserved as punchy play, attacking verve and style went in unison with an unwavering battling spirit which Dundee could not cope with.

The home fans let rip at their manager Jocky Scott at full-time and it's maybe a sign that as we enter February a strong challenge from the North is being felt by the long-term leaders. The surprise in the team-lines was that Dundee's top scorer Leigh Griffiths was left on the bench, although he was thrown on at the start of the second half.

County, in their red change kits, flew out the traps as Garry Wood went close from distance before Paul Di Giacomo's effort was scrambled away by Colin McMenamin. Dundee soon settled and goalkeeper Michael McGovern got down well to hold on to a stinging shot from Gary Harkins, who looked impressive on the right in the early stages.

Scott Morrison, one of many key figures for the Staggies this season, then forced a save from Rab Douglas and Lawson saw his dipping drive just rise above the bar from distance. However, Lawson's moment arrived on 44 minutes when he collected a weak clearance from a County corner and lashed a fierce drive into the net via a slight deflection from a Dundee stopper.

Griffiths' appearance after the break lifted home hearts, but County ensured he never popped up in the danger zones.

Indeed, it was the Dingwall side who could have grabbed another when Martin Scott went down in the box from a Brian Kerr challenge but referee Mike Tumilty waved away the appeals. Keeper McGovern had a huge hand in County leaving as the winners when he reacted smartly to stop efforts from Richie Hart and Harkins.

After the six minutes of stoppage time, the visiting bench and players celebrated what could well be a crucial win at Dens Park.

Dundee:
Douglas, Paton, Lauchlan, Malone (Benedictus 52), Forsyth, Hart (Shinnie 70), Young, Kerr, Harkins, McMenamin, Clarke (Griffiths 46).

Ross County:
McGovern, Miller, Boyd, Keddie, Morrison (Watt 86), Brittain, Gardyne (Vigurs 80), Lawson, Scott, Di Giacomo, Wood (Kettlewell 54).

Referee: Mike Tumilty.

Attendance: 4912.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 01-Feb-2010, 05:52 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Prestwick businessman fined for blowing nose in stationary car
Jan 29 2010 by Lisa Boyle, Ayrshire Post


A RESPECTED businessman faces a criminal conviction for blowing his nose. Michael Mancini decided to clear his sinuses while he was stuck in stationary traffic along Ayr High Street. But nearby police didn’t take kindly to it and slapped Michael with a fine and penalty points on his licence.

The officers claimed he wasn’t in control of his vehicle when he produced a tissue and blew his nose. The dad-of-two has refused to pay the £60 fine – so Michael faces a trial at Ayr District Court later this year. He explained: “Kyle Street was closed at the time, so traffic was being sent down the High Street. The traffic was stopped all the way up, nose to tail. I decided to blow my nose, so I put my handbrake on and took it out of gear. I noticed four police officers standing near the Wallace Tower. Then when I looked up one of them waved me over. I still had the tissue in my hand and was totally stunned when he said I was getting a fixed penalty notice for not being in control of my car. Surely it would have been more dangerous to drive with a blocked nose struggling to breathe.”

Michael, 39, who runs a furniture restoration business with his brother Philip, has had a licence for 32 years and has never had a driving conviction. He continued: “I thought it was some kind of Beadle’s About moment, a wind up. I could see the officer’s point if I was on my phone or something, but I wasn’t. The traffic was at a complete standstill and I had my handbrake on. I tried to explain that to the officer but he wouldn’t listen. He didn’t know what the code would be on the fixed penalty so he had to ask his colleague. Then he just went through the procedure and that was that.”

In June last year, Stewart Smith was issued with a fixed penalty notice by the same police officer when he dropped a £10 note in the street. The officer believed the Dalrymple man was littering. But Stewart said he simply missed his back pocket and dropped it by accident. Prestwick man Michael is still baffled by the October 26 incident and has taken legal advice on the matter.

His lawyer, Peter Lockhart, has written to the procurator fiscal saying it “beggars belief” that this happened. But prosecutors are adamant they will be using their resources to put Michael through a trial. Michael continued: “I’m really angry about it. It’s doubtful that I’ll get legal aid so this could potentially cost me thousands of pounds in legal fees. But I won’t be paying the fixed penalty.”

Mr Lockhart added: “We will be contesting this and fighting it all the way.”

A spokesperson for Strathclyde Police said: “We can confirm that a 39-year-old man is the subject of a report to the procurator fiscal in connection with an alleged traffic offence on October 26, 2009.”
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 03-Feb-2010, 01:04 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Police want victims to come forward to flush out flasher
Edinburgh Evening News, 03 February 2010
By ALAN McEWEN


POLICE today urged more women targeted by a serial flasher who has struck at least five times in two upmarket city streets to come forward.

The flasher, who is believed to be aged between 18 and 24, has targeted women heading to work in the Grange area. All five reports have come from Grange Road and Kilgraston Road, and taken place between 6:30am and 7am. But detectives are appealiADVERTISEMENTng to any victims who have not reported the incident to police to come forward.

Officers are studying CCTV from the area in a bid to identify the suspect, who has preyed on victims in the neighbourhood where former RBS chief Sir Fred Goodwin, TV presenter John Leslie and ex-Scotland football boss George Burley have homes. Some of the victims have been women walking to work while others have been passengers on buses going past.

In the latest attack, the flasher exposed himself to a young woman on Friday morning. Another indecent exposure took place six days earlier on 23 January, while a separate report was made on 19 January. The first sighting was made on 23 October last year, with another incident following on 18 December.

The suspect is described as 5ft8in tall, and of medium build. He usually wears a dark hooded top, with the hood pulled over his face, along with dark-coloured trousers and shoes.

PC Margaret Tulloch, from the force's Amethyst unit, which investigates sex offences, said: "We have descriptions from the victims, but they tend to see the suspect then look away quickly when they see what he is doing. There may be other victims who have not reported the matter to police and we would ask them to contact police."

Officers would not speculate on why the flasher was targeting the same streets at similar times on each occasion, but said they were following "lines of inquiry".

Detective Constable Mark Petrie added: "This behaviour has been directed at young professional people on their way to work and it has caused upset to those involved. This might have been the kind of thing that some people put down to a prank, but these are crimes, this is unacceptable behaviour and it is criminal behaviour."
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 04-Feb-2010, 10:55 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Okay, this isn't in Scotland, but its interesting nonetheless...


UK man's castle won't be his home, court says

By GREGORY KATZ, Associated Press Writer Gregory Katz, Associated Press Writer – Wed Feb 3, 1:30 pm ET


LONDON – A man's home is his castle — but not if British authorities say it has to be destroyed.

That's the situation faced by Robert Fidler, a farmer who lost a High Court bid Wednesday to protect the once-secret castle he built 40 miles (65 kilometers) south of London and kept hidden from planning authorities. The adverse decision means Fidler's roof must come down. He has one year to comply unless an appeal is successful.

To keep prying eyes from noticing his unauthorized abode, Fidler placed bales of hay and tarpaulin around his dream home in Salfords, Surrey, authorities said. The court ruled he could not benefit from his deception.

Mike Miller, a chief planner with the Reigate and Banstead Borough Council, said the council was delighted with the decision, which it viewed as a vindication of the decision to challenge Fidler in court.

"This was a blatant attempt at deception to circumvent the planning process," he said, adding that Fidler now has one year to destroy the castle, remove the ruins and return the property to its original state.

The unusual castle, complete with cannon, ramparts and stained glass, was completed in 2002 and Fidler lived there with family for more than four years before the authorities started legal action against him.

Fidler, who has had disagreements with planning authorities before, anticipated that his request for permission to build the castle would be denied, so he tried to take advantage of a rule that allows a structure to be legalized if it has been lived in for four years.

Fidler's lawyer, Pritpal Singh Swarn, said the decision will go to the Court of Appeal because it raised important planning issues. A further appeal to European courts is possible if British courts again reject Fidler's bid to legitimize his castle.

He said Fidler was extremely disappointed with the ruling and no local residents had complained about the castle. "It has been pursued at the expense of the taxpayer which we find deeply regrettable — but Mr. Fidler will continue to fight for the right to live in his home," the lawyer said.

Authorities said he incorporated two grain silos into the design, covering them with material to give them a castellated appearance. "Mr. Fidler made it quite clear that the construction of his house was undertaken in a clandestine fashion," the court ruled.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 05-Feb-2010, 04:11 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Whisky collection set to raise more than £500,000
3,000 bottles of rare malts sold at auction

The Evening Express, By Sally McDonald, Published: 05/02/2010


COLLECTOR: Willard Folsom has a passion for rare malt whiskies.

WHISKIES from the Aberdeen area are being auctioned off as part of a Californian man’s huge collection of rare malts. The whisky collection of Willard Folsom, who died in 2008 aged 64, has so far netted more than £400,000 in sales held by London auctioneers Bonhams.

And industry insiders reckon the 3,000-bottle whisky collection – some of it from distilleries in the Aberdeen area – is likely to burst its half-a-million pound target when the last of the malts go on sale.

Whiskies from the Aberdeen area in Mr Folsom’s collection included a 40-year-old malt from the Glenfiddich Distillery in Banffshire’s Dufftown and a 50-year-old malt from Stonehaven’s Glenury Royal Distillery.

Read more: http://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/Article.as...8#ixzz0ehKv6tMb
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 06-Feb-2010, 03:09 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Pope urges Scots bishops to tackle 'the increasing tide of secularism'


The Scotsman, Date: 06 February 2010
By TOM PETERKIN


SCOTLAND is a country plagued by sectarianism and struggling with a rising "tide of secularism", the Pope has declared, in an address to the country's Catholic bishops in Rome. He ended months of speculation when he confirmed he was to visit Scotland later this year.

But in remarks that contrast with those of John Paul II, the last pope to visit Scotland, Benedict XVI attacked proposed new laws, and said the country was battling with sectarianism as a result of a "great rupture" with its Catholic past. The Pope urged his Scottish bishops to "grapple firmly with the challenges presented by the increasing tide of secularism in your country".

He also used his speech to condemn euthanasia – comments widely interpreted as a criticism of Margo MacDonald's attempt to pass an assisted suicide bill at Holyrood. "Support for euthanasia strikes at the very heart of the Christian understanding of the dignity of human life," the Pope said.

He also drew attention to Scotland's Protestant-Catholic religious divide when he looked back to the Reformation of 1560. "The Church in your country, like many in Northern Europe, has suffered the tragedy of division," he said. "It is sobering to recall the great rupture with Scotland's Catholic past that occurred 450 years ago."

He acknowledged that progress had been made to close the divide but stressed that sectarianism remained a Scottish problem. "I give thanks to God for the progress that has been made in healing the wounds that were the legacy of that period, especially the sectarianism that has continued to rear its head even in recent times," he said.

The Pope also paid tribute to what he said was the role played by Scotland's Catholic schools in overcoming sectarianism – an analysis that will not be shared by critics of schooling along religious lines. But in a statement that accepted his views were not shared by all, he said: [I]"All too often, the Church's doctrine is perceived as a series of prohibitions and retrograde positions, whereas the reality, as we know, is that it is creative and life-giving, and it is directed towards the fullest possible realisation of the great potential for good and for happiness that God has implanted within every one of us."[/I]

The Pope's willingness to embrace contentious subjects has prompted concern that his trip will not be met with the rapture that greeted the previous papal visit. His predecessor John Paul II's pastoral trip in 1982 prompted euphoria among the hundreds of thousands of people who flocked to Glasgow's Bellahouston Park and Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh.

Even before yesterday's remarks, Benedict XVI's visit to the UK was already set to be highly controversial. He is likely to meet a wave of demonstrations across Britain after he condemned Labour's equality laws earlier this week. Humanists, gay groups and academics joined politicians in criticising his unprecedented intervention in domestic politics.

In a lecture to English Catholic bishops in Rome on Sunday, the Pope described Harriet Harman's Equality Bill as "unjust", a restriction on religious freedom and a violation of "the natural law" – in other words, Christian teaching.

Benedict XVI's attack came as Ms Harman tries to convince Christian leaders that the Equality Bill will not damage their rights to refuse to hire homosexual staff.

In Scotland yesterday, the Pope was urged to "relax", following his lament that Scotland was losing touch with religion. Patrick Harvie, the leader of the Green Party, said: "I agree Scotland is a more secular society, but I think that's a very good thing for equality in all its forms and for all religions. I would invite his Holiness to relax about this social change and enjoy it. I would acknowledge sectarianism is a problem, but there are other forms of racism that are bigger problems." He added: "Nevertheless, I think this is an interesting contribution, and maybe some people will find his words provocative."

His views on euthanasia were disputed by Ms MacDonald, the MSP who has been campaigning for terminally ill people to have the right to end their own lives. She said it was "logical" for Catholic bishops to discuss the issue at their meeting but added: "When the Pope refers to euthanasia, that is death brought about not on the wishes of the person concerned, but by another person who takes the decision. My bill rests on the autonomy of the person concerned, and their capacity to make their wishes known after medical examination and after satisfying witnesses they have not been coerced or persuaded to end their life. It appears as though the Pope is unaware of the difference."

The pontiff was invited to the UK by Prime Minister Gordon Brown during a private audience in February. A spokesman for the Church of Scotland said they "rejoiced" with Catholics over the fact the Pope was coming. "The last time a pope visited Scotland, it had a strong influence on ecumenical links and we hope this will be the case again," a spokesman said.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 08-Feb-2010, 10:46 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







High street fighting back
By Duncan Bick
Forres Gazette, Published: 03 February, 2010


FORRES is fighting back against the shoplifting which has been plaguing the High Street, according to several of the town's shop managers.


Back in November 2009 the "Forres Gazette" revealed that thieving in shops was a major problem, especially among charity shops, with one losing £1,500 worth of stock a year because of theft. Managers said that since the article appeared, thanks to a combination of vigilance from the town's people, changes in floor layout, staff effort and increased police presence, Forres has taken a step forward in tackling the problem.

British Red Cross shop manager Ken Thomson said he has noticed a reduction in the number of thefts from the shop. "After the article a number of people came in and said they just didn't believe people would steal from a charity shop," he said. "Our customers are now making things as uncomfortable as possible for people stealing things." He said that customers were now approaching staff if they suspected anybody of shoplifting. Mr Thomson also praised local police and said he had been visited by officers since November and had discussed setting up an "early warning" system with them.

"The problem will always be there," he said, "but it has now been brought to the attention of normal people." His comments were echoed by Neil Thomson, manager of Boots the Chemist. "The staff are a lot more vigilant," he said. "There have also been customers who have said to us 'Someone over there looks a bit funny', they are quite good in that way."

He applauded the police and said officers had made a good effort to be more visible around the High Street at busy times. Mr Thomson also said that coverage of the issue in the "Gazette" has helped deal with the situation. "It has made everyone aware that it is happening and let the people doing it know that we are on the case." He added that the shop floor had been rearranged with common shoplifter targets moved.

Chest, Heart and Stroke shop manager Sue Wood said that she had also seen a slight fall in shoplifting and felt this could be down to greater awareness of the issue. However, she also said the shop had been less busy since November and this may also be the cause.

The Co-operative supermarket's manager, Craig Milton, said he had also rearranged his shop floor to combat thieves. "Since just after Christmas it hasn't been too bad but we do still have two to three incidents a week," he said. "Touch wood, it hasn't been too bad lately."

Mr Milton also said the supermarket had increased staffing in the evenings when it was open until 10pm. At Forres' branch of Superdrug, manager Wendy Forrest said that they were alerted to theft mainly through the "buzzers" at the store's exit.

She repeated a call made in November for a 'ring round' system to be set up in the town. This would see each shop send out alerts to the others if they suspected somebody of shoplifting on the High Street. "We used to have one but it just fell by the wayside," she said.

Forres-based Police Sergeant Sean Jones said his force had a strong community focus and was aware of concerns about shoplifting in the town. "We increased the number of high visibility foot patrols in Forres town centre over the festive period, in particular at peak shopping times," he said. "It is a normal part of our community involvement remit to carry out foot patrols and we do try to do this as often as possible."

Sgt Jones praised the burgh's community beat officer, PC Kevin Skivington, who he said had been especially active in making foot patrols. "As this appears to have had an effect on shoplifting, every effort will be made to maintain the number of patrols," he said.

Sgt Jones added that the 'ring round' system was being updated and would be relaunched in the next few weeks.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 10-Feb-2010, 03:00 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Loch Ness harbour designs to come under public scrutiny
Inverness Courier, Published: 09 February, 2010


DESIGNS featuring wood and glass and a structure resembling a modern-day broch are among the ideas which have been put forward for a new £2.3 million harbour at Loch Ness.

Now, members of the public are being asked to give their views before the final decision is made on the project, first unveiled last year by Jacobite Cruises. The company wants to develop a new harbour, car park, reception and visitor facilities on a four-acre site at Brackla near to the Clansman Hotel on the loch's western shores.

Following initial consultations with community groups, tourism professionals and other loch users, Jacobite briefed four Scottish design firms to present their ideas for the development.

Members of the public are now being invited to comment on the designs which can be seen on the project's website - www.jacobitediscovery.co.uk.

The company expects to announce in the next two weeks which of the four firms - Mckenzie Strickland, Gareth Hoskins, Cameron Webster and ANTA - has been successful. A planning application is then expected to be submitted to Highland Council in the spring.

The design for the new harbour and visitor facility by MSA Architects. Rod Michie, director at Jacobite, said the company hoped to create a tourism facility which enhanced the visitor experience for years to come. "We want local people to be proud of a facility that is iconic yet sympathetic to one of the best known and most beautiful tourism destinations in the world," he said.

Jacobite Cruises, which attracts more than 100,000 customers annually on its Loch Ness tours, last year won a Thistle Award for Going the Extra Mile.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
WallaceGal 
Posted: 10-Feb-2010, 04:04 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
Group Icon

Group: Founder
Posts: 285
Joined: 19-Jun-2008
ZodiacAsh

Realm: Highland MI

female





Ugh! They're sitting on the most beautiful loch in Scotland (IMHO) and they want to drop a cement block on it? UGH! If they're going to spend that much money on it, make it look historically accurate.

ugh


--------------------
user posted image
Glamis Castle, Forfar, Scotland

Quando omni flunkus, moritati

Slàinte!
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 10-Feb-2010, 07:25 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Thanks WallaceGal for the post! I tend to agree with you.

At least they seem open to community and tourist input. In fact, on the link www.jacobitediscovery.co.uk. one can learn more and even submit feedback - yes even from us in USA and around the world.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 10-Feb-2010, 07:36 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







'Right to Roam' challenge to Alladale plans fails
The Northern Times, Published: 04 February, 2010


A BID by a local authority access officer to use Right to Roam legislation to prevent Alladale Wilderness Reserve from keeping wild animals in a secure enclosure has failed.

Highland councillors this week agreed to renew the reserve's Dangerous Wild Animals licence to keep 30 boar and four elk in a 500-acre fenced-off enclosure on the 23,500 acre estate. Sutherland's access officer, Matt Dent, had objected to the application under the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003, which establishes the right to be on land and to cross land.

But members of Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross Licensing Committee gave it the green light after hearing from their clerk and legal adviser, Donald Somerville, that the Right to Roam legislation was not relevant because the application was being made under the Wild Animals Act 1976.

Councillors declined to view a five-minute PowerPoint presentation prepared by Mr Dent on the grounds that it also was not relevant. Their decision further reinforces the view that the law governing the keeping of dangerous animals is in direct conflict with Scotland's Right to Roam legislation.

No representative from Alladale Wilderness Reserve, located near Ardgay, was present at Monday's licensing committee meeting which was held in the Community Centre, Helmsdale. But the committee heard from Mr Dent and also from area environmental health manager Chris Ratter who recommended the application be approved.

Mr Dent said he was generally concerned that the enclosure denied walkers and mountaineers their access rights. But his main concern was that the enclosure lies on a track leading to the 846metre Corbett, Carn Ban, at the head of Glen Alladale. He said it had been suggested that the animals be kept in a smaller enclosure, but this did not find favour with reserve managers.

Mr Dent said: "Keeping animals in itself is not a problem but the size of the enclosure has to be reasonable. The estate has 15 acres below the lodge that is fenced to the same standard as the larger enclosure and this could be used for boar and elk."

Area environmental health officer Chris Ratter explained that the wilderness reserve had been granted permission in 2007, under delegated powers, to keep 30 wild boar in a secure enclosure. That permission had now lapsed and Alladale was seeking to renew it with consent to keep four elk as well as the 30 wild boar. Mr Ratter said his department had consulted widely at the time the original application was granted and had received no objections.

Fresh consultation had taken place as a result of the renewal application and the only objection received had been from the access officer. Mr Ratter said: "I don't consider Right to Roam legislation to be relevant to the granting of this licence because the Land Reform Act did not amend the Dangerous Wild Animals Act. There is no amendment, thus I assumed it would stand on its own."

Mr Ratter reassured councillors that the estate had put up enough signs warning the public about the electric fence, which measures 5ft in height and over four miles in length, surrounding the enclosure. Mr Somerville commented: "It is my view that issues related to the Right to Roam legislation are not relevant for the determination of this application." Mr Somerville pointed out that even if the application was refused, there was no obligation on the land owner to disassemble the fence.

The committee chair, Councillor Alasdair Rhind (Tain and Easter Ross), said: "People still have 23,000 acres to roam about in anyway. The guidance we are getting is that we have to determine this today under the Dangerous Wild Animals Act 1976 and not against anything else like the Right to Roam."

Councillors unanimously agreed to grant the application with various conditions including that the 30 or so gates built into the fence should be locked. Meanwhile, Rob Gibson, SNP MSP for the Highlands and Islands, has called for urgent clarification of the law of access.

"Since the license for a fenced enclosure in 2007 the eccentric plans of Paul Lister were exposed in an embarrassing TV series. This showed a millionaire lording it over his private mountain kingdom with scant regard to public access and long established customary rights. I am concerned that the LibDem led Highland Council is allowing conflicting laws to clash. Which takes precedence? Do we have to bow to private whims and block access through wild country that could be a life and death issue for walkers in severe weather. I am astounded that the licensing board chair Cllr Alasdair Rhind showed scant regard for the physical dangers to walkers on the Alladale path. Access to the bulk of the estate is no excuse for blocking the long used Alladale path. I will raise the matter with the Minster, but meantime I hope to hear how Highland Council will review this unfortunate decision."
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 11-Feb-2010, 01:12 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Fashion designer Alexander McQueen found dead

The Herald, Published on 11 Feb 2010


British fashion designer Alexander McQueen has been found dead after apparently committing suicide at his home. The 40-year-old was discovered at his property in Green Street, in London’s West End, shortly after 10am today.

Paramedics were called but he was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said his death is not being treated as suspicious. A spokeswoman for Mr McQueen said: “Mr McQueen was found dead this morning at his home. We’re devastated and I hope you understand that out of respect to his family and his colleagues we’re not going to be making any further statement.”

The designer’s real name was Lee McQueen, but he was known as Alexander. His design company, also called Alexander McQueen, said in a statement: “On behalf of Lee McQueen’s family, Alexander McQueen today announces the tragic news that Lee McQueen, the founder and designer of the Alexander McQueen brand, has been found dead at his home.

“At this stage it is inappropriate to comment on this tragic news beyond saying that we are devastated and are sharing a sense of shock and grief with Lee’s family. Lee’s family has asked for privacy in order to come to terms with this terrible news and we hope the media will respect this.”

Alexandra Shulman, editor of British Vogue, said: “Lee McQueen influenced a whole generation of designers. His brilliant imagination knew no bounds as he conjured up collection after collection of extraordinary designs. At one level he was a master of the fantastic, creating astounding fashion shows that mixed design, technology and performance and on another he was a modern-day genius whose gothic aesthetic was adopted by women the world over.

“His death is the hugest loss to anyone who knew him and for very many who didn’t.” Designer Katherine Hamnett said: “He was a genius. What a terrible, tragic waste.”

Culture Secretary Ben Bradshaw said: “Alexander McQueen made an outstanding contribution to British fashion. “His extraordinary talent and creativity mean that his designs are adored not just by followers of haute couture but lovers of great style everywhere. This is a great loss to one of Britain’s most successful industries and to the design world more widely.”

A silver Toyota Hiace marked private ambulance arrived shortly before 4.30pm. A man dressed as an undertaker went inside. A few minutes later, a stretcher was removed from the vehicle and was taken inside.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
englishmix 
Posted: 12-Feb-2010, 08:40 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 985
Joined: 30-Jan-2009
ZodiacBirch

Realm: My place







Bodies of Scots soldiers return home


Corporal Johnathan Moore and Private Sean McDonald have been flown back to the UK after being killed in an explosion in Afghanistan.

STV, 12 February 2010 08:02 AM


The bodies of two Scots soldiers killed in an explosion in Afghanistan have now returned to the UK. Corporal Johnathan Moore and Private Sean McDonald were flown back to RAF Lyneham, in Wiltshire.

A private ceremony is being held at the base's chapel before the cortege passes through the streets of nearby Wootton Bassett. Hundreds are expected to line the streets in tribute as the Union flag-draped coffins are driven past the war memorial.

Cpl Moore and Pte McDonald, of The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, were killed in an explosion near Sangin on February 7. Cpl Moore, 22, was born in Bellshill, Lanarkshire, and grew up in Hamilton. He was commanding his section on a routine night patrol to the south of the company base that evening when an IED (Improvised Explosive Device) detonated, killing him and Pte McDonald.

Pte McDonald, 26, was born in Toronto, and went to school in Edinburgh. He leaves behind his wife, Jennifer, his mother, Jacqueline, brother, Darryle McDonald, and sister, Ceilidh Spratt.

Their commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Charlie Herbert, said Cpl Moore was "the perfect Scottish warrior" and that Pte McDonald "died a hero". The body of a third soldier Warrant Officer Class 2 David Markland - a bomb disposal expert – has also been repatriated.

WO2 Markland, 36, from Euxton, Lancashire was killed in another IED blast the day after Cpl Moore and Pte McDonald. Father of two and a Royal Engineer Search Adviser, he was part of a team clearing routes of explosives in Nad-e-Ali in Helmand.
PMEmail Poster                
Top
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

 








Celtic RadioTM broadcasts through Live365.com and StreamLicensing.com which are officially licensed under SoundExchange, ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and SOCAN.
©2014 Celtic Radio Network, Highlander Radio, Celtic Moon, Celtic Dance, Ye O' Celtic Pub and Celt-Rock-Radio.
All rights and trademarks reserved. Read our Privacy Policy.
Celtic Graphics ©2014, Cari Buziak


Link to CelticRadio.net!
Link to CelticRadio.net
View Broadcast Status and Statistics!

Best Viewed With IE 8.0 (1680 x 1050 Resolution), Javascript & Cookies Enabled.


[Home] [Top]

Celtic Hearts Gallery | Celtic Mates Dating | My Celtic Friends | Celtic Music Radio | Family Heraldry | Medival Kingdom | Top Celtic Sites | Web Celt Blog | Video Celt