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Patch 
Posted: 06-Jun-2009, 08:34 PM
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On June 6, 1944, the ``D-Day'' invasion of Europe took place during World War II as Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy, France.

On this date:

In 1809, Sweden adopted a new constitution.

In 1844, the Young Men's Christian Association was founded in London.

In 1918, American Marines suffered heavy casualties as they launched their eventually successful counteroffensive against German troops in the World War I Battle of Belleau Wood in France.

In 1925, Walter Percy Chrysler founded the Chrysler Corp.

In 1934, the Securities and Exchange Commission was established.

In 1966, black activist James Meredith was shot and wounded as he walked along a Mississippi highway to encourage black voter registration.

In 1968, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy died at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, a day after he was shot by Sirhan Bishara Sirhan.

In 1978, California voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition 13, a primary ballot initiative calling for major cuts in property taxes.

In 1982, Israeli forces invaded Lebanon to drive Palestine Liberation Organization fighters out of the country. (The Israelis withdrew in June 1985.)

In 1989, burial services were held for Iran's spiritual leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. Washington state Democrat Tom Foley succeeded Jim Wright as House speaker.

Ten years ago: The space shuttle Discovery returned from a 10-day mission that included a visit to the international space station. At the Tony Awards, Arthur Miller's ``Death of a Salesman'' was named best revival; ``Side Man'' won best play; ``Fosse'' was awarded best musical. In tennis, Andre Agassi won the French Open, defeating Andrei Medvedev 1-6, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4, while in golf, Juli Inkster shot a final-round 1-under 71 for a 16-under 272 total to win the U.S. Women's Open.

Five years ago: World leaders, including President George W. Bush and French President Jacques Chirac, put aside their differences to commemorate the D-Day invasion that broke Nazi Germany's grip on continental Europe. ``Avenue Q'' won best musical at the Tony Awards, while ``I Am My Own Wife'' was named best play; Phylicia Rashad, who starred in a revival of ``A Raisin in the Sun,'' became the first black actress to win a Tony for a leading dramatic role. Unseeded Gaston Gaudio upset Guillermo Coria 0-6, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1, 8-6 to win the French Open.

One year ago: The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 394.64 points to 12,209.81, its worst loss in more than a year. Crude futures made their biggest single-day jump ever, soaring nearly $11 for the day to $138.54 a barrel. Actor Bob Anderson, who played young George Bailey (James Stewart) in ``It's a Wonderful Life,'' died in Palm Springs, Calif., at age 75.

Today's Birthdays: Actress Billie Whitelaw is 77. Civil rights activist Roy Innis is 75. Singer-songwriter Gary ``U.S.'' Bonds is 70. Country singer Joe Stampley is 66. Actor Robert Englund is 60. Folk singer Holly Near is 60. Singer Dwight Twilley is 58. Playwright-actor Harvey Fierstein is 55. Comedian Sandra Bernhard is 54. Tennis player Bjorn Borg is 53. Actress Amanda Pays is 50. Comedian Colin Quinn is 50. Record producer Jimmy Jam is 50. Rock musician Steve Vai is 49. Rock singer-musician Tom Araya (Slayer) is 48. Actor Jason Isaacs is 46. Rock musician Sean Yseult (White Zombie) is 43. Actor Max Casella is 42. Actor Paul Giamatti is 42. R&B singer Damion Hall (Guy) is 41. Rock musician Bardi Martin is 40. Rock musician James ``Munky'' Shaffer (Korn) is 39. TV correspondent Natalie Morales is 37. Country singer Lisa Brokop is 36. Rapper-rocker Uncle Kracker is 35. Actress Sonya Walger is 35. Actress Staci Keanan is 34.

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Posted: 08-Jun-2009, 09:15 AM
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Today is Monday June-08-2009.

What was happen in:

632:Mohammed, the founder of Islam passed away in Medina.

1849: Imperial edict about the formation of the Genadrmerie (police) in Austria-Hungary.

1937: World premiere of "Carmina Burana" by Carl Orff in Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

1986: Kurt Waldheim became Federal President in Austria

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Posted: 08-Jun-2009, 07:50 PM
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On June 8, A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina.

On this date:

In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tenn.

In 1861, Tennessee seceded from the Union.

In 1864, Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president during the National Union (Republican) Party's convention in Baltimore.

In 1905, President Theodore Roosevelt offered to act as a mediator in the Russo-Japanese War.

In 1915, Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned in a disagreement with President Woodrow Wilson over U.S. handling of the sinking of the Lusitania.

In 1948, the ``Texaco Star Theater'' made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Berle guest-hosting the first program. (Berle was later named the show's permanent host.)

In 1966, a merger was announced between the National and American Football Leagues, to take effect in 1970.

In 1967, 34 U.S. servicemen were killed when Israeli forces raided the Liberty, a Navy ship stationed in the Mediterranean. (Israel called the attack a tragic mistake.)

In 1978, a jury in Clark County, Nev., ruled the so-called ``Mormon will,'' purportedly written by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, was a forgery.

In 1998, the National Rifle Association elected Charlton Heston its president.

Ten years ago: The United States, Russia and six leading democracies authorized a text calling for a peacekeeping force in Kosovo. President Bill Clinton announced new restrictions aimed at making it tougher for teens to sneak into R-rated movies.

Five years ago: The U.N. Security Council gave unanimous approval to a resolution endorsing the transfer of sovereignty to Iraq's new government by the end of June. Three Italians and a Polish contractor who'd been abducted in Iraq were freed by U.S. special forces. An American who worked for a U.S. defense contractor was shot and killed in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In a celestial rarity, Venus lined up between the sun and the Earth.

One year ago: Skyla Jade Whitaker, 11, and Taylor Paschal-Placker, 13, were shot to death along a country road near Weleetka, Okla., in a killing that remains unsolved. A man went on a knifing rampage in Tokyo, killing seven people. The average price of regular gas crept up to $4 a gallon. Rafael Nadal won his fourth consecutive French Open title in a rout, 6-1, 6-3, 6-0, again spoiling Roger Federer's bid to complete a career Grand Slam. Yani Tseng of Taiwan became the first rookie in 10 years to win a major, beating Maria Hjorth on the fourth hole of a playoff with a 5-foot birdie on the 18th hole to win the LPGA Championship.


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Posted: 10-Jun-2009, 08:29 AM
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Today's Highlight in History:

On June 10, 1935, Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Akron, Ohio.

On this date:

In 1865, the Richard Wagner opera ``Tristan und Isolde'' premiered in Munich.

In 1907, 11 men in five cars set out from the French embassy in Beijing on a race to Paris. (Prince Scipione Borghese of Italy was the first to arrive in the French capital two months later.)

In 1940, Italy declared war on France and Britain; Canada declared war on Italy.

In 1942, the Gestapo massacred 173 male residents of Lidice, Czechoslovakia, in retaliation for the killing of a Nazi official.

In 1964, the Senate voted to limit further debate on a proposed civil rights bill, shutting off a filibuster by Southern senators.

In 1967, the Middle East War ended as Israel and Syria agreed to observe a U.N.-mediated cease-fire.

In 1977, James Earl Ray, the convicted assassin of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., escaped from Brushy Mountain State Prison in Tennessee with six others; he was recaptured June 13.

In 1978, Affirmed won the Belmont Stakes and with it, horse racing's Triple Crown.

In 1982, the play ``Torch Song Trilogy,'' by Harvey Fierstein, opened on Broadway.

In 1985, socialite Claus von Bulow was acquitted by a jury in Providence, R.I., at his retrial on charges he'd tried to murder his heiress wife, Martha ``Sunny'' von Bulow.

Ten years ago: Yugoslav troops departed Kosovo, prompting NATO to suspend its punishing 11-week air war. The Supreme Court ruled, 6-3, that Chicago went too far in its fight against street gangs by ordering police to break up groups of loiterers.

Five years ago: Singer-musician Ray Charles, known for such hits as ``What'd I Say,'' ``Georgia on My Mind'' and ``I Can't Stop Loving You,'' died in Beverly Hills, Calif., at age 73.

One year ago: A Sudanese jetliner skidded off a runway and crashed into airport lights after landing in Khartoum, killing 30 people.

Today's Birthdays: Britain's Prince Philip is 88. Columnist Nat Hentoff is 84. Actor-director Lionel Jeffries is 83. Author Maurice Sendak is 81. Attorney F. Lee Bailey is 76. Actress Alexandra Stewart is 70. Singer Shirley Alston Reeves (The Shirelles) is 68. Actor Jurgen Prochnow is 68. Media commentator Jeff Greenfield is 66. Country singer-songwriter Thom Schuyler is 57. Former Sen. John Edwards is 56. Actor Andrew Stevens is 54. Singer Barrington Henderson is 53. Former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer is 50. Rock musician Kim Deal is 48. Singer Maxi Priest is 48. Actress Gina Gershon is 47. Actress Jeanne Tripplehorn is 46. Rock musician Jimmy Chamberlin is 45. Actress Kate Flannery is 45. Model-actress Elizabeth Hurley is 44. Rock musician Joey Santiago is 44. Actor Doug McKeon is 43. Rock musician Emma Anderson is 42. Country musician Brian Hofeldt (The Derailers) is 42. Rapper The D.O.C. is 41. Rock singer Mike Doughty is 39. R&B singer JoJo is 38. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is 38. R&B singer Faith Evans is 36. Actor Hugh Dancy is 34. R&B singer Lemisha Grinstead (702) is 31. Actor DJ Qualls is 31. Actor Shane West is 31. Singer Hoku is 28. Actress Leelee Sobieski is 27. Olympic gold medal figure skater Tara Lipinski is 27. Dallas Cowboys running back Marion Barber is 26

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Posted: 12-Jun-2009, 06:23 AM
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On June 12, 1963, civil rights leader Medgar Evers, 37, was fatally shot in front of his home in Jackson, Miss. (In 1994, Byron De La Beckwith was convicted of murdering Evers and sentenced to life in prison; he died in 2001.)

On this date:

In 1665, England installed a municipal government in New York, formerly the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam.

In 1776, Virginia's colonial legislature became the first to adopt a Bill of Rights.

In 1898, Philippine nationalists declared independence from Spain.

In 1909, New York's Queensboro Bridge was formally dedicated, more than two months after it had opened to the public.

In 1929, Holocaust diarist Anne Frank was born in Frankfurt.

In 1939, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum was dedicated in Cooperstown, N.Y.

In 1967, the Supreme Court, in Loving v. Virginia, struck down state laws prohibiting interracial marriages.

In 1979, 26-year-old cyclist Bryan Allen flew the manpowered Gossamer Albatross across the English Channel.

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan, during a visit to a divided Berlin, publicly challenged Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to ``tear down this wall.''

In 1994, Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman were slashed to death outside her Los Angeles home. (O.J. Simpson was later acquitted of the killings in a criminal trial, but was eventually held liable in a civil action.)

Ten years ago: Thousands of NATO peacekeeping troops poured into Kosovo by air and by land; but in a surprising move, a Russian armored column entered Pristina before dawn to a heroes' welcome from Serb residents.

Five years ago: Gunmen firing from a car killed Iraqi deputy foreign minister Bassam Salih Kubba. Suspected militants killed an American in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Former President Ronald Reagan's body was sealed inside a tomb at his presidential library in Simi Valley, Calif., following a week of mourning and remembrance by world leaders and regular Americans.

One year ago: In a stinging rebuke to President George W. Bush's anti-terror policies, a deeply divided Supreme Court ruled that foreign detainees held for years at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba had the right to appeal to U.S. civilian courts to challenge their indefinite imprisonment without charges. Three heavily armed robbers stole two Pablo Picasso prints, ``The Painter and the Model'' and ``Minotaur, Drinker and Women,'' from a museum in Sao Paulo, Brazil. (The prints were later recovered.) Taiwan and China agreed to set up permanent offices in each other's territory for the first time in nearly six decades.


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Posted: 14-Jun-2009, 09:44 AM
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On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress in Philadelphia adopted the Stars and Stripes as the national flag.

On this date:

In 1775, the Continental Army, forerunner of the U.S. Army, was created.

In 1801, former American Revolutionary War general and notorious turncoat Benedict Arnold died in London.

In 1846, a group of U.S. settlers in Sonoma proclaimed the Republic of California.

In 1909, actor and folk singer Burl Ives was born in Hunt City, Ill.

In 1919, John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown embarked on the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean. (Flying a Vickers Vimy biplane bomber, they took off from St. Johns, Newfoundland, and arrived 16 1/2 hours later in Clifden, Ireland.)

In 1940, German troops entered Paris during World War II; the same day, the Nazis opened the Auschwitz concentration camp in German-occupied Poland.

In 1943, the Supreme Court, in West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, ruled that children in public schools could not be forced to salute the U.S. flag.

In 1954, the words ``under God'' were added to the Pledge of Allegiance.

In 1967, the space probe Mariner 5 was launched from Cape Kennedy, Fla., on a flight that took it past Venus.

In 1985, the 17-day hijack ordeal of TWA Flight 847 began as a pair of Lebanese Shiite Muslim extremists seized the jetliner shortly after takeoff from Athens, Greece.

Ten years ago: About 15,000 NATO peacekeepers spread out across Kosovo, including a convoy of about 1,200 U.S. Marines. The Supreme Court opened the door to full broadcast advertising of casino gambling, ruling a federal ban aimed at protecting compulsive gamblers violated free-speech rights.

Five years ago: A car bomb exploded during rush hour on a busy street in Baghdad, killing 12 people - five of them foreigners working to rebuild Iraq's power plants. The Supreme Court allowed schoolchildren to keep affirming loyalty to one nation ``under God,'' but dodged the underlying question of whether the Pledge of Allegiance was an unconstitutional blending of church and state.

One year ago: Iran rejected a six-nation offer of incentives to stop enriching uranium, prompting President George W. Bush and French President Nicolas Sarkozy to jointly warn Tehran anew during a news conference in Paris against proceeding toward a nuclear bomb.


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Posted: 17-Jun-2009, 07:22 AM
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On June 17, 1775, the Revolutionary War Battle of Bunker Hill took place near Boston. The battle (which actually occurred on Breed's Hill) was a costly victory for the British, who suffered heavy losses while dislodging the rebels.

On this date:

In 1885, the Statue of Liberty arrived in New York Harbor aboard the French ship Isere.

In 1928, Amelia Earhart embarked on a trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland to Wales with pilots Wilmer Stultz and Louis Gordon, becoming the first woman to make the trip as a passenger.

In 1944, the republic of Iceland was established.

In 1957, mob underboss Frank Scalice was shot to death at a produce market in the Bronx, N.Y.

In 1959, a British court awarded American entertainer Liberace 8,000 pounds (the equivalent of $22,400) in his libel suit against the Daily Mirror over an article that Liberace charged implied he was a homosexual.

In 1961, Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev defected to the West while his troupe was in Paris.

In 1969, the raunchy musical review ``Oh! Calcutta!'' opened in New York.

In 1971, the United States and Japan signed a treaty under which Okinawa would revert to Japanese control.

In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon's eventual downfall began with the arrest of five burglars inside Democratic national headquarters in Washington, D.C.'s Watergate complex.

In 1986, President Ronald Reagan announced the retirement of Chief Justice Warren Burger, who was succeeded by William Rehnquist.

Ten years ago: The Republican-controlled House narrowly voted to loosen restrictions on sales at gun shows, marking a victory for the National Rifle Association. Joseph Stanley Faulder, a former auto mechanic who'd killed a woman during a 1975 burglary, became the first Canadian to be executed in the United States in almost half a century as he was lethally injected in Huntsville, Texas.

Five years ago: A bipartisan report found that officials, blindsided by terrorists and beset by poor communications, were so slow to react on Sept. 11, 2001, that the last of four hijacked planes had crashed by the time Vice President Dick Cheney ordered hostile aircraft shot down. President George W. Bush disputed the Sept. 11 commission's finding that Saddam Hussein had no strong ties to al-Qaida. A sport utility vehicle packed with artillery shells slammed into a crowd waiting to volunteer for the Iraqi military, killing 35 people.

One year ago: Hundreds of same-sex couples got married across California on the first full day that gay marriage became legal by order of the state's highest court. (However, California voters later approved Proposition 8, which restricted nuptials to a union between a man and a woman.) A truck bombing in Baghdad killed 63 people. Four British soldiers were killed by an explosive in Afghanistan's Helmand province. The Boston Celtics won their 17th NBA title with a stunning 131-92 blowout over the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 6. Igor Larionov and Glenn Anderson were elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame along with former linesman Ray Scapinello and junior hockey builder Ed Chynoweth. Actress-dancer Cyd Charisse died in Los Angeles at age 86.

Today's Birthdays: Actor Peter Lupus is 77. Singer Barry Manilow is 63. Comedian Joe Piscopo is 58. Actor Mark Linn-Baker is 55. Musician Philip Chevron (The Pogues) is 52. Actor Jon Gries is 52. Movie producer-director-writer Bobby Farrelly is 51. Actor Thomas Haden Church is 48. Actor Greg Kinnear is 46. Actress Kami Cotler (``The Waltons'') is 44. Olympic gold-medal speed skater Dan Jansen is 44. Actor Jason Patric is 43. R&B singer Kevin Thornton is 40. Actor-comedian Will Forte is 39. Latin pop singer Paulina Rubio is 38. Tennis player Venus Williams is 29. Washington Redskins defensive lineman Albert Haynesworth is 28. Actor-rapper Herculeez (Herculeez and Big Tyme) is 26. Actor Damani Roberts is 13.

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Posted: 17-Jun-2009, 10:40 AM
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June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 197 days remaining until the end of the year.


1462 – Vlad III the Impaler attempts to assassinate Mehmed II (The Night Attack) forcing him to retreat from Wallachia.

1497 – Battle of Deptford Bridge – forces under King Henry VII defeat troops led by Michael An Gof.

1565 – Matsunaga Hisahide assassinates the 13th Ashikaga shogun, Ashikaga Yoshiteru.

1579 – Sir Francis Drake claims a land he calls Nova Albion (modern California) for England.

1631 – Mumtaz Mahal dies during childbirth. Her husband, Mughal emperor Shah Jahan I, then spends more than 20 years building her tomb, the Taj Mahal.

1773 – Cúcuta, Colombia is founded by Juana Rangel de Cuéllar

1775 – American Revolutionary War: Battle of Bunker Hill

1789 – In France, the Third Estate declares itself the National Assembly.

1839 – In the Kingdom of Hawaii, Kamehameha III issues the Edict of toleration which gives Roman Catholics the freedom to worship in the Hawaiian Islands. The Hawaii Catholic Church and the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace is later established as a result.

1863 – Battle of Aldie in the Gettysburg Campaign of the American Civil War.

1876 – Indian Wars: Battle of the Rosebud – 1,500 Sioux and Cheyenne led by Crazy Horse beat back General George Crook's forces at Rosebud Creek in Montana Territory.

1877 – Indian Wars: Battle of White Bird Canyon – the Nez Perce defeat the US Cavalry at White Bird Canyon in the Idaho Territory.

1885 – The Statue of Liberty arrives in New York Harbor.

1898 – The United States Navy Hospital Corps is established.

1901 – The College Board introduces its first standardized test, the forerunner to the SAT.

1930 – U.S. President Herbert Hoover signs the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act into law.

1932 – Bonus Army: around a thousand World War I veterans amass at the United States Capitol as the U.S. Senate considers a bill that would give them certain benefits.

1933 – Union Station Massacre: in Kansas City, Missouri, four FBI agents and captured fugitive Frank Nash were gunned down by gangsters attempting to free Nash.

1939 – Last public guillotining in France. Eugen Weidmann, a convicted murderer, is guillotined in Versailles outside the prison Saint-Pierre.

1940 – World War II: Operation Ariel begins – Allied troops start to evacuate France, following Germany's takeover of Paris and most of the nation.

1940 – World War II: sinking of the RMS Lancastria by the Luftwaffe near Saint-Nazaire, France.

1940 – World War II: the British Army's 11th Hussars assault and take Fort Capuzzo in Libya, Africa from Italian forces.

1940 – The three Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania fall under the occupation of the Soviet Union.

1944 – Iceland declares independence from Denmark and becomes a republic.

1948 – A Douglas DC-6 carrying United Airlines Flight 624 crashes near Mount Carmel, Pennsylvania, killing all 43 people on board.

1953 – Workers Uprising: in East Germany, the Soviet Union orders a division of troops into East Berlin to quell a rebellion.

1958 – The Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing being built connecting Vancouver and North Vancouver, Canada, collapses into the Burrard Inlet, killing many of the ironworkers and injuring others.

1958 – The Wooden Roller Coaster at Playland, which is in the Pacific National Exhibition, Vancouver, Canada opens. It is still open today.

1961 – The New Democratic Party of Canada is founded with the merger of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) and the Canadian Labour Congress.

1963 – The United States Supreme Court rules 8 to 1 in Abington School District v. Schempp against allowing the reciting of Bible verses and the Lord's Prayer in public schools.

1972 – Watergate scandal: five White House operatives are arrested for burglarizing the offices of the Democratic National Committee, in an attempt by some members of the Republican party to illegally wiretap the opposition.

1987 – With the death of the last individual, the Dusky Seaside Sparrow becomes extinct.

1991 – Apartheid: the South African Parliament repeals the Population Registration Act, which had required racial classification of all South Africans at birth.

1992 – A 'Joint Understanding' agreement on arms reduction is signed by U.S. President George H. W. Bush and Russian President Boris Yeltsin (this would be later codified in START II).

1994 – Following a televised low-speed highway chase , O.J. Simpson is arrested for the murders of his wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman.


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On June 18, 1940, during World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill urged his countrymen to conduct themselves in a manner that would prompt future generations to say, ``This was their finest hour.''

On this date:

In 1778, American forces entered Philadelphia as the British withdrew during the Revolutionary War.

In 1812, the United States declared war against Britain.

In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte met his Waterloo as British and Prussian troops defeated the French in Belgium.

In 1873, suffragist Susan B. Anthony was found guilty by a judge in Canandaigua, N.Y., of breaking the law by casting a vote in the 1872 presidential election. (The judge fined Anthony $100, but she never paid the penalty.)

In 1908, William Howard Taft was nominated for president by the Republican national convention in Chicago.

In 1945, William Joyce, known as ``Lord Haw-Haw,'' was charged in London with high treason for his English-language wartime broadcasts on German radio. (He was hanged the following January.)

In 1959, actress Ethel Barrymore died in Los Angeles at age 79.

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter and Soviet President Leonid I. Brezhnev signed the SALT II strategic arms limitation treaty in Vienna.

In 1983, astronaut Sally K. Ride became America's first woman in space as she and four colleagues blasted off aboard the space shuttle Challenger.

In 1984, Alan Berg, a Denver radio talk show host, was shot to death outside his home. (Two white supremacists were later convicted of civil rights violations in the slaying.)

Ten years ago: The House rejected gun control legislation, 280-147, with many Democrats rebelling against National Rifle Association-backed provisions in the bill. The Group of 7 nations opened a three-day summit in Cologne, Germany. Arsonists struck three synagogues in the Sacramento, Calif., area. (Two white supremacist brothers were later convicted of federal charges and received sentences of 21 to 30 years in prison.)

Five years ago: An al-Qaida cell in Saudi Arabia beheaded American engineer Paul M. Johnson Jr., posting grisly photographs of his severed head; hours later, Saudi security forces tracked down and killed the alleged mastermind of the kidnapping and murder. European Union leaders agreed on the first constitution for the bloc's 25 members.

One year ago: With gasoline topping $4 a gallon, President George W. Bush urged Congress to lift its long-standing ban on offshore oil and gas drilling, saying the United States needed to increase its energy production; Democrats quickly rejected the idea. French filmmaker Jean Delannoy died in Guainville, France, at age 100.

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On June 19, 1865, Union troops commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War was over, and that all remaining slaves in Texas were free.

On this date:

In 1862, slavery was outlawed in U.S. territories.

In 1910, Father's Day was celebrated for the first time, in Spokane, Wash.

In 1917, during World War I, King George V ordered the British royal family to dispense with German titles and surnames; the family took the name ``Windsor.''

In 1934, the Federal Communications Commission was created; it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

In 1938, four dozen people were killed when a railroad bridge in Montana collapsed, sending a train known as the ``Olympian'' hurtling into Custer Creek.

In 1952, the celebrity-panel game show ``I've Got A Secret'' made its debut on CBS-TV with Garry Moore as host.

In 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, N.Y.

In 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was approved by the Senate, 73-27, after surviving a lengthy filibuster.

In 1977, Pope Paul VI proclaimed a 19th-century Philadelphia bishop, John Neumann, the first male U.S. saint.

In 1986, University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias, the first draft pick of the Boston Celtics, suffered a fatal cocaine-induced seizure.

Ten years ago: Author Stephen King was seriously injured when he was struck by a van driven by Bryan Smith on a two-lane highway in North Lovell, Maine. Britain's Prince Edward married commoner Sophie Rhys-Jones in Windsor, England. The Dallas Stars won the Stanley Cup in triple overtime by defeating the Buffalo Sabres 2-1 in Game 6. Turin, Italy, was chosen as the site of the 2006 Winter Olympic Games.

Five years ago: The U.S. military stepped up its campaign against militant leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, launching an airstrike that pulverized a suspected hideout in Fallujah, Iraq.

One year ago: President George W. Bush surveyed the aftermath of devastating floods during a quick tour of the Midwest, assuring residents and rescuers alike that he was listening to their concerns and understood their exhaustion. Democrat Barack Obama announced he would bypass public financing for the presidential election, even though Republican John McCain was accepting it.


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On June 20, 1893, a jury in New Bedford, Mass., found Lizzie Borden not guilty of the ax murders of her father and stepmother.

On this date:

In 1782, Congress approved the Great Seal of the United States.

In 1837, Queen Victoria acceded to the British throne following the death of her uncle, King William IV.

In 1863, West Virginia became the 35th state.

In 1909, actor Errol Flynn was born in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

In 1943, race-related rioting erupted in Detroit; federal troops were sent in two days later to quell the violence that resulted in more than 30 deaths.

In 1947, Benjamin ``Bugsy'' Siegel was shot dead at the Beverly Hills, Calif., mansion of his girlfriend, Virginia Hill, apparently at the order of mob associates.

In 1963, the United States and Soviet Union signed an agreement to set up a ``hot line'' between the two superpowers.

In 1967, boxer Muhammad Ali was convicted in Houston of violating Selective Service laws by refusing to be drafted. (Ali's conviction was ultimately overturned by the Supreme Court).

In 1979, ABC News correspondent Bill Stewart was shot to death in Managua, Nicaragua, by a member of President Anastasio Somoza's national guard.

In 2001, Houston resident Andrea Yates drowned her five children in the family bathtub, then called police. (Yates was later convicted of murder, but had her conviction overturned; she was acquitted in a retrial.)

Ten years ago: As the last of 40,000 Yugoslav troops rolled out of Kosovo, NATO declared a formal end to its bombing campaign against Yugoslavia. Payne Stewart won his second U.S. Open title, by one stroke over Phil Mickelson.

Five years ago: The Arab satellite TV network Al-Jazeera aired a videotape from al-Qaida-linked militants showing a South Korean hostage begging for his life and pleading with his government to withdraw troops from Iraq. (The hostage, Kim Sun-il, was beheaded two days later.) Retief Goosen captured his second U.S. Open in four years at Shinnecock Hills on Long Island.

One year ago: Lightning began sparking more than 2,000 fires across northern and central California, eventually burning over a million acres.

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On June 21, 1788, the U.S. Constitution went into effect as New Hampshire became the ninth state to ratify it.

On this date:

In 1834, Cyrus Hall McCormick received a patent for his reaping machine.

In 1932, heavyweight Max Schmeling lost a title fight rematch in New York by decision to Jack Sharkey, prompting Schmeling's manager, Joe Jacobs, to exclaim: ``We was robbed!''

In 1948, the Republican national convention opened in Philadelphia. (The delegates ended up choosing Thomas E. Dewey to be their presidential nominee.)

In 1963, Cardinal Giovanni Battista Montini was chosen to succeed the late Pope John XXIII; the new pope took the name Paul VI.

In 1964, civil rights workers Michael H. Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James E. Chaney disappeared in Philadelphia, Miss.; their bodies were found buried in an earthen dam six weeks later.

In 1973, the Supreme Court, in Miller v. California, ruled that states may ban materials found to be obscene according to local standards.

In 1982, a jury in Washington found John Hinckley Jr. not guilty by reason of insanity in the shootings of President Ronald Reagan and three other men.

In 1985, scientists announced that skeletal remains exhumed in Brazil were those of Nazi war criminal Josef Mengele.

In 1989, a sharply divided Supreme Court ruled that burning the American flag as a form of political protest is protected by the First Amendment.

In 1990, an estimated 50,000 Iranians were killed by an earthquake.

Ten years ago: President Bill Clinton visited Slovenia, formerly part of Yugoslavia, where he publicly urged Serbs to reject Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic. NATO and the Kosovo Liberation Army, meanwhile, signed an accord providing for the demilitarization of the KLA.

Five years ago: The SpaceShipOne rocket plane punched through Earth's atmosphere, then glided to a landing in California's Mojave Desert in the first privately financed manned spaceflight. Connecticut Gov. John Rowland resigned effective July 1, 2004, amid graft allegations and a federal investigation. (Rowland, who ended up serving 10 months in prison, was succeeded by Lt. Gov. M. Jodi Rell.)

One year ago: A ferry carrying more than 800 people capsized as Typhoon Fengshen battered the Philippines; only about four dozen people survived. The body of a pregnant Army soldier, Spc. Megan Touma, 23, was found submerged in a motel room bathtub in Fayetteville, N.C. (Sgt. Edgar Patino, said by police to be the unborn baby's father, was charged with first-degree murder.) Scott Kalitta died when his Funny Car burst into flames and crashed at the end of the track during the final round of qualifying for the Lucas Oil NHRA SuperNationals at Old Bridge Township Raceway Park in New Jersey.

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June 23, 1969, Warren E. Burger was sworn in as chief justice of the United States by the man he was succeeding, Earl Warren.

In 1757, forces of the East India Company led by Robert Clive won the Battle of Plassey, which effectively marked the beginning of British colonial rule in India.

In 1868, Christopher Latham Sholes received a patent for his ``Type-Writer.''

In 1931, aviators Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from New York on a round-the-world flight that lasted eight days and 15 hours.

In 1938, the Civil Aeronautics Authority was established.

In 1947, the Senate joined the House in overriding President Harry S. Truman's veto of the Taft-Hartley Act, designed to limit the power of organized labor.

In 1956, Gamal Abdel Nasser was elected president of Egypt.

In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin held the first of two meetings at Glassboro State College in New Jersey.

In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon and White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman discussed a plan to use the CIA to obstruct the FBI's Watergate investigation. (Revelation of the tape recording of this conversation sparked Nixon's resignation in 1974.)

In 1985, all 329 people aboard an Air India Boeing 747 were killed when the plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near Ireland, after a bomb widely believed to have been planted by Sikh separatists exploded.

In 1989, the Supreme Court refused to shut down the ``dial-a-porn'' industry, ruling Congress had gone too far in passing a law banning all sexually oriented phone message services.

Ten years ago: A divided Supreme Court dramatically enhanced states' rights in a trio of decisions that eroded Congress' power. U.S. Marines in Kosovo killed one person and wounded two others after coming under fire; no Marines were injured. Two months after his retirement, Wayne Gretzky was voted into the Hockey Hall of Fame along with former referee Andy Van Hellemond and Ian (Scotty) Morrison in the builder category.

Five years ago: In a major retreat, the United States abandoned an attempt to win a new exemption for American troops from international prosecution for war crimes - an effort that had faced strong opposition because of the Iraqi prisoner abuse scandal.

One year ago: Outraged at the turmoil in Zimbabwe, the U.N. Security Council declared that a fair presidential vote was impossible because of a ``campaign of violence'' waged by President Robert Mugabe's government. Seattle's Felix Hernandez hit the first grand slam by an American League pitcher in 37 years, then departed with a sprained ankle before he could qualify for a win in the Mariners' 5-2 victory over the New York Mets.

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Five hundred years ago, on June 24, 1509, Henry VIII was crowned king of England; his wife, Catherine of Aragon, was crowned queen consort.

On this date:

In 1314, the forces of Scotland's King Robert I defeated the English in the Battle of Bannockburn.

In 1497, the first recorded sighting of North America by a European took place as explorer John Cabot spotted land, probably in present-day Canada.

In 1793, the first republican constitution in France was adopted.

In 1807, a grand jury in Richmond, Va., indicted former Vice President Aaron Burr on charges of treason and high misdemeanor. (He was later acquitted).

In 1908, the 22nd and 24th presidents of the United States, Grover Cleveland, died in Princeton, N.J., at age 71.

In 1940, France signed an armistice with Italy during World War II.

In 1948, Communist forces cut off all land and water routes between West Germany and West Berlin, prompting the western allies to organize the Berlin Airlift. The Republican National Convention, meeting in Philadelphia, nominated New York Gov. Thomas E. Dewey for president.

In 1968, ``Resurrection City,'' a shantytown constructed as part of the Poor People's March on Washington, D.C., was closed down by authorities.

In 1975, 113 people were killed when an Eastern Airlines Boeing 727 crashed while attempting to land during a thunderstorm at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.

In 1983, the space shuttle Challenger - carrying America's first woman in space, Sally K. Ride - coasted to a safe landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

Ten years ago: Union organizers claimed victory after workers at six Fieldcrest Cannon mills in North Carolina voted to be represented by the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees. (Fieldcrest Cannon's parent company, Pillowtex, went bankrupt in 2003.) Testimony wound to an end after 76 days in the landmark Microsoft antitrust trial.

Five years ago: Federal investigators questioned President George W. Bush for more than an hour in connection with the news leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame's identity. A federal appeals court struck down an FCC effort to make sweeping changes in media ownership rules. In a bizarre conclusion to a huge upset, the chair umpire called the wrong score in the second tiebreaker, and Venus Williams fell 7-6 (5), 7-6 (6) to Karolina Sprem in the second round at Wimbledon.

One year ago: Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe refused to give into pressure from Africa and the West, saying the world can ``shout as loud as they like'' but he would not cancel an upcoming runoff election even though his opponent had quit the race. Leonid Hurwicz, who shared the Nobel Prize in economics in 2007, died in Minneapolis at age 90.

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On June 25, 1950, war broke out in Korea as forces from the communist North invaded the South.

On this date:

In 1788, Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution.

In 1868, Congress passed an Omnibus Act allowing for the readmission of Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina to the Union.

In 1876, Lt. Col. George A. Custer and his 7th Cavalry were wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana.

In 1906, architect Stanford White was shot to death atop New York's Madison Square Garden, which he had designed, by millionaire Harry K. Thaw, the jealous husband of Evelyn Nesbit. (Thaw was acquitted of murder by reason of insanity.)

In 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 was enacted.

In 1942, some 1,000 British Royal Air Force bombers raided Bremen, Germany, during World War II.

In 1959, spree killer Charles Starkweather, 20, was put to death in Nebraska's electric chair. Eamon de Valera was inaugurated as president of Ireland.

In 1962, the Supreme Court, in Engel v. Vitale, ruled that recital of a state-sponsored prayer in New York State public schools was unconstitutional.

In 1973, former White House Counsel John W. Dean began testifying before the Senate Watergate Committee.

In 1996, a truck bomb killed 19 Americans and injured hundreds at a U.S. military housing complex in Saudi Arabia.

Ten years ago: During a news conference, President Bill Clinton said the people of Serbia had to ``get out of denial'' about the atrocities blamed on Slobodan Milosevic and decide if he was fit to remain president of Yugoslavia. The San Antonio Spurs won their first title as they defeated the New York Knicks 78-77 in Game 5 of the NBA finals.

Five years ago: Republican Jack Ryan withdrew from the U.S. Senate race in Illinois after allegations of sex-club visits with his then-wife, actress Jeri Ryan. President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, opened a European trip as they arrived in Ireland. Taliban fighters killed up to 16 men after learning they had registered for Afghanistan's U.S.-backed national elections.

One year ago: A divided Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana law that allowed capital punishment for people convicted of raping children under 12; the ruling also invalidated laws in five other states that allowed executions for child rape that did not result in the death of the victim. A jury in Woburn, Mass., convicted Neil Entwistle of first-degree murder in the deaths of his wife, Rachel, 27, and their 9-month-old baby, Lillian Rose. (Entwistle was sentenced the next day to two life prison terms without possibility of parole.) Wesley N. Higdon, 25, shot and killed five workers and himself at a western Kentucky plastics plant; a sixth victim survived.

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