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sisterknight 
Posted: 01-Apr-2009, 02:34 PM
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did i hear double-doubles mentioned????did you know that the province of new brunswick drinks the most timmies???not only that but the rollll up the rim has more prizes for that province than an other....this is a fact folks!! cheers.gif


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Camac
Posted: 01-Apr-2009, 02:50 PM
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sisterknight;

Did you know that Hamilton Ontario, population 490,280 has more Tim Hortons' than any other city. Corporate Headquarters is here in Oakville and Wendy's is the parent company now.


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oldraven 
Posted: 01-Apr-2009, 06:43 PM
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Antigonish, with a population of around 5,000, has three Tim Hortons. It also has two stoplights on the Trans Canada Highway (for the time being).

We really are obsessed about our Timmies, aren't we?


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Camac
Posted: 01-Apr-2009, 07:09 PM
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oldraven;

Yeah enough of Coffee.. Lets get back to the topic at hand. Like why we are what we are.

One of the most common things that makes us different from our cousins is language. We both speak English but we spell different ways and we call the same things by different names.

American:-Trash
Cdn.:- Garbage
American:- Gutters
Cdn:- Eavestrough
American:- Aluminum
Cdn:- Aluminium
American:- Cement
Cdn:- Concrete. (To us Cement is the powder that Concrete is made from.)

We're Metric they are not and before we were Metric we were Imperial. They don't put vinegar on there fries we do.They have dollar bills , we have the Loonie coin. America stopped using 2 dollar bills years ago we didn't and then gave them
up for the Toonie coin. Also all American money is Green where ours is a different
colour for each Denomination. I'm sure there are many other small differences but I can't think of them just now.


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LadyOfAvalon 
Posted: 01-Apr-2009, 07:27 PM
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QUOTE (InRi @ 01-Apr-2009, 12:31 PM)
Hi Camac and all involved friends
Thank you for starting this thread. I'm sure, I'll learn a lot about your beautiful country - by firsthand accounts. wink.gif

I have to admit that I am railroad enthusiast too and of course I read something about the Canadian railways. Unfortunately is the reading material about it rather rare here in Europe... Some time ago I watched a half-hour-reportage about a voyage by "The Canadian" across Canada (I think it is THE train there in Canada) - a voyage in it must be awesome! I saw in a (railroad-)periodical fascinating photos of modern Canadian trains. I can imagine that the railways in the past (and today?) played a major role in development of your country. If it is possible for you I want to know more about it. If you have advices to get something to read (or watch) I were very thankful.

I'm looking forward to the Canada-thread.

Best regards

Ingo

Hi InRi,

Here are some links for you to look at.

Though travelling Canada is considered a unique experience it is very different than travelling Europe by train. One Europeeans countries are much smaller and to get from one destination to another is much faster whereas here is it costly and a very long trip. Especially if one travel from East to West.

As you know Canada like the U.S is a big large country and if one consider travelling the whole distance from East to West...we have 6 time zone...

And Camac is right... The Canadian National Railways was a passenger train before and now is only freight.

So here are the links for you.

Via Rail Canada

Canadian Train Trips

Train Travel across Canada

Good reading!!!

LOA smile.gif


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Harlot 
Posted: 01-Apr-2009, 08:58 PM
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I would really like too try one (maybe more then one) of the Double-Double. Please


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Camac
Posted: 01-Apr-2009, 09:05 PM
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Harlot;

If your close to Sarnia or Windsor and have a passport just cross over and ask for the nearest Tim Hortons'. Order a Large, small or Medium Double Double and some Timbits and enjoy.


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oldraven 
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 06:14 AM
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Tim Hortons actually has a count of 520 stores in the US now. http://www.timhortons.com/us/locator/index.html

This is the first time I've seen the trip planner, and it's quite funny, and shows just how desperate we are for their Java. The idea is to be able to plan your road trips around Tim Hortons locations, so you can always have a Timmies in your hand. You can choose how far from your route you want to be redirected. laugh.gif

Yes, enough Timmie talk! wink.gif

QUOTE
The history of the Maritimes is mostly forgotten in the rest of Canada with the exception of the Acadian Expulsion. That though if I remember correctly was most caused by pressure from the New Englanders. Our loss was Americas gain with the Cajuns.
As I have mentioned before I think we can have fun with this and learn from each other and maybe give our American Cousins some insight as to why we are who we are.

Camac


Yes, it was over pressure from New England. And for good reason. The Crown was passing this hat (Nova Scotia) back and forth with France like it was bought with a basket of herring, but the people in New England (moreso in Virginia) paid in blood (it was once given as a wedding gift to a member of French Royalty, a Prince, I believe). They were fighting with the French and Natives over this land, after gaining control of New England, and it wasn't just soldiers dying. Village raids were not uncommon at all. Later on, during a British occupation, Scalping raids would happen regularly, and it prompted a retaliation where the Crown was paying for scalps taken by Brits of the Natives. That's right, we were scalping the Indians just as much as they were us, and we were getting paid for it. One of the darker truths about the forming of this region.

Sure, the French got along and co-operated with the Natives, and that's the way it was always portrayed, but they also rallied them up to fight and attack the British soldiers and in turn became a target. They essentially set them up for genocide. In my opinion, they're still paying for being our enemy by the sheer existence of archaic treaties (living in reservations on the worst land that could possibly have been found). It is a form of Apartheid, make no mistake about it.

Camac, I wonder about that 'Aluminium' fact all the time. It's written in our Dictionary this way, but have you ever actually heard a Canadian say "al-yew-MINI-um", or like they do in the US, "ah-LOO-min-um"? Again, this is a case of us becoming Americanised by mainstream media. I don't even think our own news agencies use the word Aluminium. Even our accents have become more Americanised in the last 50 to 100 years. This is very evident when you hear old news clips, or even talk to elderly people in the area. We're al turning into California, if you get what I mean. wink.gif
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Camac
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 07:10 AM
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oldraven;

Scalping raids were quite common on bothsides even after the French and Indian War (Seven Years War) it was divide and conquer keeping the tribal rivalry alive and well.

Your right about "aluminium" I have met very few of us who use it. Our form of the English Language is protected by a Law that was passed decades ago but it has seemed to have fallen by the wayside. Our way of speaking is slowly becoming Americanized because of the massive influence of American Culture we get from T.V. and the movies. I'm afraid soon it will be indistinguishable although many Americans I have met , even recently, claim we say oot, aboot, hoose, instead of out, about, and house. I blame the Education System for not pushing our way of speaking or spelling. It seems that teachers now adays just can't be bothered and of course they are also influenced by what they see on TV and movies.


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oldraven 
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 07:24 AM
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OH! Don't get me started on the 'Aboot' thing! rolleyes.gif

This is a great piece of Canadian cultural education. No Canadians pronounce the word 'about' as 'ah-BOOT'. None! We do pronounce it different, but not like you would think. We say 'ah-BOAT', as in "What are you getting to the island in?", not "What's that high sided shoe like thing on your left foot?" wink.gif I've even had some Americans argue with me that we do say it this way, and they talked to a guy in Saskwamitchamoot who said it that way. No, with all due respect, you didn't. Like I stated in my first post, I've been to almost every province in this nation, and talked with enough Newfies to know their accent, and not one person from any one of them said 'ah-BOOT' unless they were talking about solitary footwear.
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Camac
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 08:02 AM
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oldraven;

Each part of Canada has its' own dialect and colloquialisms I have a older chap in the building from one of the outports in Nfld/Lab. and I have trouble sometimes understanding him and I'm sure he has trouble understanding me. When I was living in the States for 6 years there were certain accents I had a helluva time understanding, especially the ones from the deep south or western states. There is an anchor woman on CTVNews Net, Cindy something, and to me she sounds just like she were on CNN.


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oldraven 
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 08:40 AM
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Not that long ago, the dialects in Newfoundland were very diverse. From one village to the next (literally the next) they would have different words for the same item or act. The Rock afforded so much isolation, before major highways were built, that they would rarely even speak with people from neighbouring communities. To this day, certain communities are still waiting for a highway to be built to their area.
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InRi 
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 11:34 AM
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Hi LoA, Hi Camac

thank you very much for your advices/links.

Camac, I checked your advice and I saw that these books (The National dream/The last spike) are available in the amazon-shop here. Beautiful... there's something to read for me - in English of course wink.gif
QUOTE (Lady-of-Avalon @ 01-Apr-2009, 01:27AM)
Though travelling Canada is considered a unique experience it is very different than travelling Europe by train. One Europeeans countries are much smaller and to get from one destination to another is much faster whereas here is it costly and a very long trip. Especially if one travel from East to West.

I watched the links too and I was surprised a little bit - the prices for a voyage in the "Canadian" by the way are less expensive as I thought...
... and of course it must be an unique experience. Exactly this so attractive for me... There are a fistful countries worldwide only where such train voyages are possible - and I think the "Canadian version" of these long distance train trips is the most beautiful.
Somewhere in this forum I wrote, that a trip by train in Canada is one of my dreams. I can affirm this only.

Best regards

Ingo


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Camac
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 01:47 PM
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Inri;

In the Autumn Algoma central Railroad runs tours through the Agawa Canyon just northwest of Sault Ste. Marie at the entrance to Lake Superior the website is :-www.agawacanyon.com/ColorTours. It goes through the canyon when the leaves are turning and is the most beautiful spectacular sight ever. You can fly to Calgary and take the train through the Rockies to Vancouver either through Rodgers Pass ot Kicking Horse Pass and down the Fraser Valley. At least twice a year I take the train to Brockville about three hours East of Oakville to visit cousins and I love the ride. Nothing spectacular but relaxing and enjoyable. When I was stationed in Germany my family and I travelled everywhere by Train.

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sisterknight 
Posted: 02-Apr-2009, 09:16 PM
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inri

another beautiful trip by train would be the bras d'or train....
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