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> Celtic Tribes Re-visited, YES, the long list.
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barddas 
  Posted: 01-Aug-2003, 12:39 PM
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Welsh Guy had posted this some time ago. I thought I would repost it. So some of the new people could get a look at how wide spread the celtic tribes were.


I promised to post a list of Celtic Tribes in Europe at the time of the roman Empire, here it is:-
NAME- LOCATION(S), And/Or Some Remarks
Aduatuci- L Meuse River.
Aeduii- Mid-France, between Loire and Saône Rivers.
Allartes
Allobroges- SE France near Lake Geneva
Ambarri- Mid-France kinsmen of Aedui
Ambiani- N France, near Amiens
Ambiliati- Allies of Veneti
Ambisontes- Alps
Ambivareti Subtribe of Aedui
Ambivariti- N of Meuse R.
Ambrones- Denmark, France, Central Europe
Anacalites- SE England
Anari- S. Po
Anartes- near Danube
Andes- N lower Loire R.
Aquitani- Aquitania S of Loire
Aremorican- Brittany
Arevacians- N Spain
Arvaci
Arverni- S France (Auvergne Mts.)
Atrebates- S England, N France
Atuatuci- France
Aulerci- S France
Ausci- Aquitanian tribe
Batavi- Rhine delta
Belgae- SW England, Belgium
Belli
Bellovaci- N France
Bibroci- SE England
Bigerriones- S France
Biturges- Mid-France, Bourges
Boii- M France, N Italy, Austria, S Germany
Breuci- Yugoslavia
Brigantes- N England
Britons (Britanni)- S England
Cadurci- SW France
Caereni- N Scotland
Caeroesi- Germanic
Caledones- N Scotland, Pictish
Caletes- NE France
Cantabri- N Spain coast
Carnuni- Alps
Carnutes- Mid France, SW of Paris, Orleáns
Cassi- SE England
Catalauni- N France
Caturiges- N Italy
Catuvellani- Mid-England
Celtae- Latin plural for Celts
Celtiberi- N Spain
Celtiberians- Group of tribes in Portugal & Spain
Cenimagni- SE England
Cenomani- Verona
Ceutrones- N Italy
Cimbri (Cimmerians?)- Denmark, Black Sea, France, Asia Minor
Cocosates- Aquitanian tribe
Condrusi- Germanic
Coritani- E England
Cornovii- N Scotland, Mid-England, Cornwall
Cotini- Czech Republic
Creones- W Scotland
Curiosolites- French W coast
Daci- Mid Balkans
Daesitiates- Yugoslavia
Damnonians- West Ireland
Damnonii- S Scotland
De Danann- Denmark, Ireland
Dardani- S Danube
Deceangli- N Wales
Decumates- S Germany
Delmatae- Yugoslavia
Demetae- W Wales
Diablintes- Veneti allies
Dorians- Celt like, Greece
Dumnonii- Cornwall, England
Durotiges- SE England
Eburones- Namur, France
Eburovices- N France
Elusates- Aquitanian tribe
Epidii- W Scotland
Eravisci- Hungary
Esubii- France W coast
Gabali- Near Averni
Gaesatae- N Italy
Galatians- Gallacia, Turkey not a tribe a general term
Galacians- Galacia, Spain perhaps the same as next
Gallaeci- Gallacia, Spain
Garumni- Aqutianian tribe
Gates-
Geidumni- Nervii Subtribe
Graiceli-
Grudii- Nervii subtribe
Harudes- Denmark, Central Europe ? Germanic
Helvetii- Switzerland
Helvii- Switzerland
Heraclids- Celt like, Greece
Iceni- E England
Insubres- N Italy, Milan
Laii- N Po
Latovici- Switzerland
Lemovices- North of Limoges, France
Lepontii- N Italy
Leuci- SE France
Levaci- Nervii subtribe
Lexovii- Normandy
Libici- N Po
Ligurians- N Italy, assimilated
Lingones- SE France, E Italy
Lusitanians- Portugal, Celtiberians
Lusones
Maeatae- Scotland
Mandubii- NW France
Marcomanni- Austria ? Germanic
Mediomatrices- Alps
Meldi- E Paris
Melisians- Ireland
Menapii- Belgium, France
Morini- NE France, Artois
Namnetes- Brittany, France
Nantuates- Alps
Nemetes- S Germany ? Germanic
Nervii- Belgium, France
Nitiobriges- SW France
Nonii
Norici
Novantae- England
Ordovices- Wales
Osismi- Brittany, France
Pannonii- Hungary
Parisii- Mid-England; Paris, France
Peledoni
Picts- W Scotland
Pictones- Western France
Pirustae- near Illyria
Pleumoxii- Nervii subtribe
Prausians
Pretani- England
Ptainii- Aquitanian tribe
Quadii
Raurici- Salzburg area
Redones- Brittany, France
Regni- SE England
Remi- N France, Belgium
Ruteni- S France
Saluvii- S France
Santones- W France
Scordisci- Yugoslavia
Seduni- upper Rhône
Segontiaci- SE England
Segusiavi- Lyons
Selgovae- N England
Senones- Mid - France, N Italy
Sequani- SE France
Sibuzates- Aquitanian tribe
Silures- S Wales
Sontiates- SW France
Suessiones- N France
Suetri- Alps
Suevi not a tribe, a sacral association of Celts (Langbards, Macromanni, Quadii and Senones)
Sugambri- France
Taezali- E Scotland
Tarrbelli- Aquitanian tribe
Tarusates- Aquitanian tribe
Taurini- Piedmont
Taurisci- Yugoslavia
Tectosages- Galatia, Turkey, Toulouse
Tencteri- France ? Germanic
Teutani- Another name for Teutones
Teutones- Denmark, Central Europe -Cimbri, France
Tevrisci- Slovakia
Tigurini- Bordeaux
Titti
Tolistobogii- Galatia, Turkey
Tolosates- N Italy
Treveri- S Germany, Belgium
Trinovantes- S England
Tricasses- N France
Trocini
Trocmi- Galatia, Turkey
Trumpilini- Alps
Tulingi- NE of Helvetii
Turones- Near Tours, France
Ubii- N Rhine, France
Umbrians- Apennine peninsula, Mid Italy
Usipetes- France ? Germanic
Vangianes- France - Germanic
Veliocasses- Lower Seine R.
Velnani- Alps
Vendelici- S Germany
Venelli- Normandy
Venetii- Brittany, France
Venicones- E Scotland
Venoti- Alps
Veragri- Alps
Vindelici- Manching
Viromandui- NE France
Virusii- Alps
Vaccaei- Portugal, Celtiberians
Vocates- S France
Voconti- SE France
Volcae- S France
Volcae Arecomici- SE France
Volcae Tectosages- Czech Republic
Votadini- S Scotland
Celtic Tribes In Ireland
Amalgado - Killala area, Mayo
Baiscin - W. Clare
Cairpre Gabra ? Mide
Cairpre Dromma Cliab ? Carbury
Calraige - Ardagh, Carbury, Ballymote
Carbri Riada - Antrim & Alba (Dal Riada)
Carbris - NE Sligo, N Leitrim
Cenél Maine - Lough Forbes
Cenél Fiachach ? Durrow
Chera - Castlebar, Mayo
Ciarraige - N River Suck
Ciarraige Airtig - W Lough Gara
Clann Cholmáin ? Mide
Colla DaCrioch -
Colla Uais -
Colla Maen -
Conmaicne Cúile Tolad - E Lough Mask
Conmaicne Mara ? Connemara
Conmaicne Réin - Carrick-on-Shannon
Corca Mruad ? Burren
Corco Moga - W River Suck
Corco Fir Thri - W Lough Arrow
Cuircni - E Lough Ree
Dagda ? Inishowen
Dal Cais - Previoulsy known as Deisi, Dalcassians ? Thormond
De Danann -
Deagades - Subtribe of Earnaan ? Munster
Delbna Bethra ? Clonmacnoise
Delbna Nuadat - W Lough Ree
Delbna - Iar Connacht
Earnaan - Lough Erne, Kerry
Eberians - South Ireland
Eremonians - North Ireland
Fir Bolg - Fir Domnann, Domnanians ? Erris
Gailenga - Bohola, Mayo
Gamanrad - Glenamoy, Mayo
Grecraige - N Lough Gara
Ithians -
Locha - Iar Connacht
Luighe - W Cork
Luigni ? Sligo
Máenmag - S Lough Rea
Mag Réin - E Lough Bofin
Mag nAi ? Baslick
Mag nAirtig - S Lough Gara
Mag Luirg - S Lough Key
Medraige - Clarinbridge, Galway
Melisian - All of Ireland
Musciri -
Mruadh -
Muiresc - Inniscrone, Sligo
Nemedians
Osraige ? Munster
Partaige - S Lough Mask
Partholonian -
Rudricians ? Ulster
Sodhan - Ui Maine country
Sogain -
Tethbae- E River Suck
Ui Briuin Breifne ? Leitrim
Ui Ailello ? Boyle
Ui Briuin Sinna - W Lough Ree
Ui Failgi ? Offaly
Ui Neill ? Ulster
Ui Fiachrach Mauide - N Lough Conn
Ui Briuin Umaill - Between Westport and Newport, Mayo
Ui Fiachrach Aidne ? Kiltartan
Ui Briuin Seóla - Belclare, Galway
Ui Maine - S Connacht
Ui Briuin Ai - Central Connacht
Ultach -
Umorians

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IonaNhichDohmnaill 
Posted: 05-Sep-2003, 10:55 AM
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Hello... Today's my first day in the forums and I'm just wandering around. I wanted to mention that as a new member of the dammonii tribe I'm very proud to see how widely-spread the celts really were, and also to say we're not gone yet. *grins* Thanks for not forgetting.

Iona
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Crisdean
Posted: 04-Dec-2003, 10:58 AM
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Does anyone have any opinion on the recent find of the chariot in Northern England

The Parisii tribe gave their name to Paris but are they the same lot who were present in Northern England?
               
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Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 
Posted: 04-Dec-2003, 12:43 PM
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QUOTE
Pretani- England

It can be argued that the Pretani were the tribe that gave Britain it's name.
I'm not very familiar with Celtic languages, but it seems to be that in some dialects/languages, the "p" in Pretani would be pronounced as a "b."
Here's a link to a newspaper story about the recent find:
http://www.archaeology.org/magazine.php?pa...ewsbriefs/celts
The article mentions the link between the Parisii of Northern England and the continental Gauls.
The find dates from the 3d or 4th Century BC, which would seem to affirm the view that Celts were using the chariot long before the Roman invasion.
As I understand it, the Celtic chariot was quite distinctive from the Roman version.


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Beli Mawyr 
Posted: 19-Dec-2003, 11:15 AM
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Hail everybody!
Please forgive my awful english, I'm a bit down with practice.
I read about the tribe of the Insubres so, being myself an insuber I can very shortly remember that Milan wasn't founded by the Romans but by Bellovesos King of the Insubres. This tribe does still exist as re-enactment group

www.insubres.com

and as political movement claiming independence from italy, very close to Lega Nord. In the ancient times this land - Padus Valley, Padania - was Gallia Cisalpina; we are not a latin population and we are very proud of our celtic ancestry and origins.

See you soon.

Insubres!!!!

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balisodare 
Posted: 15-Feb-2004, 10:06 AM
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I thought people like the picts were pre-celtic?


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barddas 
Posted: 06-May-2004, 10:31 AM
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QUOTE (balisodare @ Feb 15 2004, 11:06 AM)
I thought people like the picts were pre-celtic?

Brief timeline of the Picts

I haven't looked here in a while! OOps

The above link gives a brief history of the Picts. It doesn't really mention much as to pre-celtic culture or not. But if I remember correctly it is believed that the Picts came from Ireland, and crossed over to Scotland.

Here is a link to an article from Scottish History Online-
The Picts from Scotshistoryonline.co.uk/
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Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 
Posted: 06-May-2004, 03:28 PM
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FWIW, preliminary (repeat, preliminary) data from a Clan Donald genetic study I am participating in would tend to support the view that the Picts were genetically a pre-Celtic group. My own DNA results suggest that my direct paternal lineage is in the R1B Haplogroup, which is thought to be the earliest group to inhabit Western Europe, and is especially prevalent in Ireland and the Basque region of Spain. My haplotype is most closely associated with ancient Ulster: the Uladh former rulers of Ulster before 322AD, currently represented by the McGuinness and MacNeice families of County Down, Antrim and Armagh. Interestingly, this haplotype does not contain the Celtic DNA signature, which suggests that my direct paternal ancestors were in Ulster before 322 AD, and were non-Celts. There is also at least circumstantial evidence that the ancient Ulster group were related to the Picts of what became Scotland.
Combining the emerging DNA evidence with the archaeological evidence and oral traditions makes it increasingly likely that in fact the Picts were originally pre-Celtic, and that the Picts, like the Scotti, lived on both sides of the Irish Sea. Eventually, the Picts were conquered by the Gaels, and essentially became indistinguishable from Celts/Gaels, except perhaps genetically.
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ImmortalAvalon 
Posted: 10-Jul-2004, 04:15 PM
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Okay, being an avid fan of ancient history, I've just gotta put my two cents worth in, and it might be worth just that, lol.

About the list of Celtic tribes:

There is some debate about whether the Cimbri, Teutones, and their allies were Celtic or German. The fact that Strabo places their original homeland in Denmark speaks in favor of the German theory, but I don't see why they couldn't be Germanized Celts or the other way around.

I thought Galicia was called that because of the immigration from Britain in the late ancient/early medieval period when the Saxons came. People fled to Spanish Galicia like they fled to Brittany.

The two elements of the Parisii were of the same tribe, just like the Tectosages of Toulouse and Ankara were the same tribe, just different septs.

And, one more thing, the Suevi were Germans. Just look at your "sacral elements", Langbards = Langobards = Lombards. However, the Suevi in Spain were probably highly Celticized by the British immigrants.
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barddas 
Posted: 12-Jul-2004, 03:52 PM
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A brief History of Galicia
------------------------------------------------------------------------


i. The Megalithic culture

This was the first great culture to appear in Galicia and was characterized by its surprising capacity for construction and architecture, together with deep sense of religion, based on the cult of the dead, the mediators between man and the gods.

Historians consider that Megalithic Culture had an oriental source, which was predominant in the Mediterranean area, and one in the Atlantic which originated in the north of Tagus River. It had to be the latter, because of its geographical proximity with Galicia, that could explain the abundance of traces of this culture in this area. That this should be the first great culture also meant that it constituted one of the basic pillars that was to endow Galicia's cultural personality.

From this era there remain thousands of dolmens (mámoas), a type of tomb or sepulchre, throughout the entire territory. From its social organization it has been confirmed that it corresponded to some type of clan structure.

Historians such as Gordon Childe affirm that even today it is possible to find remains of traditions from that era in a number of superstitions and idiosyncrasies of local Christianity.



ii. The Bronze Era: the Celtic Tradition begins

This may be considered as the second and most important cultural stage. This was the time when great developments in metallurgy were being achieved as a result of intense mining activity that started way before. Some historians attribute the boom in this sector to the extremely dry and warm climate of the time which revealed, due to erosion it caused, the mining richness of the North.

Due to the fact that Galicia was also very humid since it was near the Atlantic, the towns of the Castilian plateau moved to the territory, thus increasing the population.

The increase in the number of inhabitants caused certain conflicts, but also contributed greatly to the mining surge with heavy production as much in weapons as in objects of usefulness. It goes without saying that the splendid jewels of gold and bronze were not amiss either. Pieces of jewellery crafted from Galician metals circulated throughout all of the Peninsula and Europe also.




iii. The Era of Castroes

This was to flourish in the second half of the Iron Age, when features differed according to the area of the Peninsula in which it manifested itself. In the Northwest, the central nucleus was situated within the confines of present day Galicia towards the East of Návia River and the south of Douro River.

This culture was to be the result of the fusion between cultural forms derived from the Bronze Age and even before that, although with a few novel contributions. In many cases they were to survive until the arrival of the Romans. The Celts brought new varieties of livestock such as the tamed horse and rye bread. The first Celtic township established in Galicia was that of the Saefes in the 10th Century BC. The Celts were to conquer the Oestrymnio, and this would also especially influence religion, political organization and maritime relations with Brittany and England. Their distinctive warring attitude led Strabo to say that they were the most difficult people in the whole of Lusitania (Portugal) to defeat.

The Castroes are circular fortified areas, each possessing one or several concentric walls, preceded generally by their corresponding moat (or defensive ditch) and situated mainly on the top of hillocks or mountain. Among the castroes found along the coast the most outstanding include Fazouro, Baroña and O Neixón. Further inland Castromao, Viladonga or Santa Tegra are also worth a mention. Something common to all of them is the fact that their inhabitants adapted to the land, and not the other way round. Such a tradition is yet respected in all the rural Galicia.

As far as the temples are concerned, the only construction uncovered has been that of Elviña. The one found at Meirás preserves a necropolis. In other castroes box-like constructions existed where ashes used to be stored. There also existed others found partially underground with a reservoir for water, where evidence of fire was found indicating that they must have been used for burning corpses.

From the end of the Megalithic period inscriptions could be found on the rocks of granite below a clear sky, whose true origin and meaning still remain a mystery to this very day.



iv. The roman occupation: the Celtic era cames to its end.

After the battle of Mount Medúlio, the Romans conquered Galicia in order to take advantage of the rich mining resources. With time they were to transform it into a province of the Empire and would recognise its personality, calling it Gallaecia. With their presence, the castroes were to lose their defensive worth. They introduced new techniques, new means of communication, new ways of organising property and their own language, but showing some tolerance of the existing culture.

Christianity came to Galicia with the Romans, achieving something that Latin would never achieve, and imposed itself on the Arianism of the Swabians and on pre-Roman paganism.

The Swabians held Galicia as an independent kingdom for some 170 years (the kingdom was called Suévia), but they were lastly overwhelmed by the Spanish Visigothics. During the Swabian reign it was definitively enforced the use of the Latin language and Christian (Arianistic) doctrines, which at first moved towards Galician (Galego) and secondly became mixed with pagan customs.

Islam people conquered all the Visigothic Kingdom of Spain in 711 AD, but they never ruled over Galicia and were forced to retire in a few years mainly because of the climatic conditions, quite different from the Castilian plateau ones.



More of this article/Maps


some sites that have migration maps!
Yorkshire information site

This one is a nice map, it's in Gaelic though.....but still an informative photo

map 2

A good site
Celtic tribes portal


That's all for now.....

Cheers, and hope this helps a bit
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ImmortalAvalon 
Posted: 12-Jul-2004, 05:34 PM
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Thank you, Barddas, that was all very interesting. If I remember correctly, the first "base" for the Reconquista was Oviedo, but I'm not sure.

Frankly, I think that explanation of the name "Galicia" makes a bit more sense than the immigrant theory, which I read in "The Celtic Empire" by Peter Beresford Ellis. Though the immigration did take place, hence the name of the early bishopric in the area, Bretona, I always thought that the name was probably older.

Suevi and Swabians were two different names for the same people. An element of them, along with some Alemanni, remained in Germany and gave its name to the German region of Swabia.

Oh! I just remembered, Oviedo was one of the first places recovered from the Moors!
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PADOS 
Posted: 10-Aug-2004, 11:06 AM
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hello everybody,

this is my first post. I'm a Celt from the Po region in Italy. So I'am an Anares.

there an important celtic tribe not listed: it was Salassi from the north of Pedmont and Aosta Valley in Italy. They was a grat and important tribe in Italy and they was very strong. The northern part of their territory was conquered only in 8 b.Ch. and in the mountain thay libved free for more long period.

Salut
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wicwisworhun 
Posted: 15-Oct-2005, 08:33 AM
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i am injoying this topi

i could be related to connard cerr of lord of darida of aryshire in scotland , well at least cerr to kerr now and naer glasgow area

to all keep it tribal
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Nancy-Raven 
Posted: 21-Oct-2005, 08:50 PM
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Ok everyone I'm just totally out of the conversation but can anyone told me where did you get the list of all the celtic tribes?Could be very usefull for my perso research but I never have enough info on the celt so if anyone could share where this came from I will enjoy to know it.Thank you.
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Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 
Posted: 24-Oct-2005, 07:15 AM
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Nancy-Raven,
A google search for Celtic tribes will give you a wealth of information.
Here are a couple of examples. There are many more lists available.
For the continental tribes, there's a fairly comprehensive list at:
Continental Celtic Tribes.
A list of British Celtic tribes can be found at British Celtic tribes.
A google search for Celtic tribes will give you a wealth of information.

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