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> Boudica, almost defeated the Roman army
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barddas 
Posted: 30-Jun-2003, 04:09 PM
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Now i read in Archeology mag. that the BBC/Hollywood are supposed to be doing a film based on her life( and legend, not too much of her everyday life is know-). I will try to find the article in Arch. mag. it was really interesting... But for now....


Boudica

(died 62 AD)
Boudica (or Boadicea) was the wife of Prasutagus, king of the Iceni, a British tribe, at a time when Britain was a Roman province. When Prasutagus died he willed half of his kingdom to the Roman empire and half to Boudica and their two daughters, Camorra and Tasca1 or, according to legend, Voada and Voadicia2. British law allowed royal inheritance to be passed to daughters in the absence of male heir, but Roman law did not. The Roman administrator ignored the will and proceded to take over the entire kingdom. Roman historian Tacitus wrote, "Kingdom and household alike were plundered like prizes of war... for a start, his widow Boudica was flogged and their daughters raped. The chieftains of the Iceni were deprived of their family estates as if the whole country had been handed over to the Romans. The king's own relatives were treated as slaves."

Enraged Boudica joined Iceni forces with another tribe, the Trinobantes, and together they fought back. They attacked and conquered the Roman colony Camulodunum (now Colchester) and burned the temple dedicated to Claudius, the Roman emperor who completed the conquest of Britain. The Romans retaliated against the insurgents by sending a whole division of soldiers, but they were defeated. The insurgents then marched on London, which they sacked, and killed its Roman population, as well as their sympathizers. They did the same at Verulamium (now St. Albans) and other settlements.

Finally, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, the Roman governor of Britain, gathered all the Roman troops in the south of Britain and attacked the British in a narrow valley so that the superior numbers of rebel force would be of no advantage against the smaller Roman army. Tacitus reported that Boudica was seen riding her chariot and inspiring her troops before the battle.

However, this time the Romans were victorious, and slaughtered the rebel troops. Boudica and her daughters escaped but then poisoned themselves rather than allow capture. Roman retribution for rebellion was swift and cruel but the British kept up the fight for another year, when Suetonius was succeeded by Publius Petronius Turpilianus, who changed the policy toward the native population to one of appeasement, which remained in use for three hundred more years of Roman occupation of Britain.



Contributed by Danuta Bois, 1997.

Bibliography:
1. Heroines: Remarkable and Inspiring Women/An Illustrated Anthology of Essays by Women Writers, Crescent Books, 1995. Boudica profile writtten by Andrea Hopkins.
2. Women Who Ruled: A Biographical Encyclopedia by Guida M. Jackson, Barnes & Noble Books, 1998

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This post has been edited by barddas on 30-Jun-2003, 04:10 PM


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Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 01-Jul-2003, 09:05 AM
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I always rather liked her =)
She was one of the few females that actually took over the role that males had in that time, and even if it was only for that she should be respected.

The Romans were afraid of Celtic women anyway, as well as Celtic Fighters, Tacitus writes about that very well putting the Celts into the role of the 18th century rosseau philosophy of the valiant barbarians...
I'll try and find some Tacitus Passages...


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Catriona 
Posted: 01-Jul-2003, 09:46 AM
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There is a wonderful statue of Boudica, situated on the steps of Westminster Bridge in London - directly opposite the Houses of Parliament. She is portrayed with her hair streaming behind her, a gold circlet in her hair and driving a chariot with the most lethal looking spears/blades on the wheels.. She looks like she is heading directly for the Parliament Building! laugh.gif
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Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 01-Jul-2003, 04:58 PM
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Mean that one?? wink.gif

user posted image
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Catriona 
Posted: 01-Jul-2003, 05:25 PM
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Yes, that's it, AD - I have a photograph of my daughter, when she was about 5, sitting in the chariot on the RH side as you are looking at the statue in that photograph!

PS Don't you think my description as very true to the statue? laugh.gif
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Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 01-Jul-2003, 05:39 PM
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Aye, it was.. let her go for the parliament... I think a bit of action wouldn't be too bad wink.gif


I actually found a nicer B/W fotograph but it wouldn't want to load... *grummel*

Well I always rather liked the historic figure of boadicea (which was the name I found her under in the net)...

BTW: would you have thought that a flogged person would be able to get up a rebellion? The thing behind flogging is it literally strips the back of a person of its skin and it is meant to break the person (as well as raping does)..
That is what I really think is amazing about Bodicea, she still pulled that through even though they tried to break her will.

This post has been edited by Aon_Daonna on 01-Jul-2003, 05:44 PM
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Catriona 
Posted: 02-Jul-2003, 04:00 AM
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I think that Boudica (Boadicea was the Roman spelling for her name, and it is now considered non-PC to use it! - although it is what that statue is called!) is part of the history schooling of all British primary schoolchildren. At 9 or 10 years of age, the idea of the woman leading her people struck a chord with many of us females!

A good book, if you see it, is Warrior Queens by Antonia Fraser - Boudica is in there, as is Elizabeth I of England and Catherine the Great of Russia... It makes for interesting reading. I bought it when it was first published - mid-90s I seem to recall.
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Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 02-Jul-2003, 11:52 AM
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Hmm.. I'll keep my eyes open...
Did you see that programme on the History channel some time ago about the Tsars? The part about Catherine the Great was very good...
I have a liking for the strong women of history because they dared, instead of hushing. My respect for those Ladies, I don't think I would be able to pull such things through in that situations.
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Catriona 
Posted: 02-Jul-2003, 04:12 PM
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No, I didn't see that programme.... but I have to confess that some of the Scottish 'history' programmes shown on the History channel have been less than factual..... so I tend to take any subject on the channel with a great big pinch of salt!

Catherine was a truly amazing woman, wasn't she...

In that book by A Fraser, the women who are featured are quite something... an Indian woman is featured as well - proving that strong women were not just a Western concept. wink.gif
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pawnman 
Posted: 17-Jul-2003, 09:44 AM
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I'd never heard of this woman before. Great stuff. I'm glad SOMEON out there is still doing some research (I never have the time. I'm lucky if I can get to the boards at all).


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RavenWing 
Posted: 17-Jul-2003, 10:49 AM
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I think I may have seen a preview for a movie on her on PBS. I think it had Alex Kingston playing her.


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barddas 
Posted: 17-Jul-2003, 11:06 AM
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HHmmm.... I'll have to see what I can find.... dry.gif
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barddas 
Posted: 17-Jul-2003, 11:21 AM
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RavenWing 
Posted: 17-Jul-2003, 12:40 PM
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It's a Masterpiece Theatre thingy. this is what it said:

QUOTE

ExxonMobil Masterpiece Theatre airs on Sunday evenings at 9:00 pm and repeats in a timeslot determined by your local PBS station. Always check your local listings. Your station's time and airdate may vary.

Customize this schedule listing


Masterpiece Theatre will return in the fall with a full slate of enthralling television. The stellar season is scheduled to include:

Andrew Davies's adaptation of
Boris Pasternak's Dr. Zhivago

Goodbye Mr. Chips, based on
James Hilton's novel

Alex Kingston (Moll Flanders, ER)
as Warrior Queen Boudica


The next installment of the
sweeping epic The Forsyte Saga

and an encore presentation of
The Hound of the Baskervilles
starring Richard Roxburgh

Stay tuned for more details, including the announcement of a new American Collection title, as the season approaches!





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barddas 
Posted: 04-Aug-2003, 02:48 PM
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Here is a piece of the article I spoke of some time ago....



CITY OF VICTORY

Burned to the ground by the Celtic warrior-queen Boudica, Camulodunum might have remained Britain's capital city had the Romans rebuilt it in the right place.

BY KRISTIN M. ROMEY


ny real estate agent will tell you that location is everything. So will archaeologist Philip Crummy, who has been digging in and around the under-celebrated town of Colchester in southeastern England for the past 30 years. On paper, the town is a tourism board's dream, from its beginnings in the first century B.C. as Camulodunum, a formidable fortress dedicated to the Celtic god of war and ruled by a native king celebrated by Shakespeare, to its designation as "Britain's first recorded town" after the Romans established a colony on the site in A.D. 50. In what Winston Churchill called "probably the most horrible episode which our Island has known," Colchester was burned to the ground during a native uprising led by the famous Celtic queen Boudica and rebuilt by the Romans, who incorporated their destroyed buildings into the defensive wall that encircles the town to this day.

It was the Romans who sealed Colchester's fate when they established their colony in a location that was perfectly adequate for local native farmers, but not for colonists who expected wine from Spain and figs from Italy. And it was the demand for such products that led to the meteoric rise of Roman Londinium at the expense of Colchester, which to this day remains a small town with a big reputation in British history. In City of Victory, his book on the archaeology and history of the town that has been his focus for the past three decades, Crummy sums up Colchester's sweeping history with a final sentence: "A few miles closer to the mouth of the Colne would have made a lot of difference."
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