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> Learning Irish Gaelic, Translation game
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 15-Jan-2008, 12:54 AM
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Dia dhuit a cairde!
Is mise Robert. Is as Boston me ach ta/ me/ i mo cho/nai i Port Angeles, WA anois.

Please forgive the lack of fadas (not installed on this computer). I use the backslash in its place for now.

My name is Robert and I'm new to the forum. When I saw that there were some members wanting to learn Irish Gaelic, I thought that maybe we could get something started.

I studied Gaeilge for a short time and it's been a while since I've had the opportunity to use it. Looking forward to brushing up if anyone is game!

I thought we could start a very simple game where I start with a simple sentence in English that someone would translate into Gaeilge. In addition to the translation the person would provide a phonetic pronunciation.

Whoever posts first would then provide another simple sentence or phrase to be translated.

I think this exercise will get anyone interested, in doing the necessary research on-line and they will learn quite a bit in the process. There are lots of on-line resources available including dictionaries whre you can translate from English to Irish and vice versa.

Let me know what you think and if you want to give it a try!

Sla/n go fo/ill





--------------------
Mise Robert an dalta, lán dóchas is grá!
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 15-Jan-2008, 01:58 AM
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Ok, got the fadas working ÁÉÍÓÚáéíóú Just had to enable the English (United Kingdom) keyboard config.

Slán

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Devlin 
Posted: 29-Jan-2008, 08:20 AM
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Hi Robert,

I don't think anyone here is up to the challenge, lol. But I'll give it a try. Maybe others will join in. I think they will. I am just a beginner, so I thought this might give me the motivation towards my studies of Irish-Gailge. I'll try to check on this on a daily basis.

Start! biggrin.gif
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 29-Jan-2008, 10:37 AM
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Wow, I had just about given up on this one!
Thanks Devlin for giving it a try. Let's keep it very simple in the beginning.

First sentence to translate into Gaeilge (the Irish gaelic language) is:

"I am Devlin and I am Irish."

Translate the sentence and then provide the phonetic pronunciation.
eg. Slán go fóill (bye for now) slawn guh fole

Here's a link that will be very useful to you in getting started. It covers the alphabet, dialects and has links to other learning resources. Use them to help you get started. http://www.omniglot.com/writing/irish.htm

I'd spend a little time and choose a dialect first. There are differences and it will less confusing to you if you stick to one for now. I like the Ulster dialect and try to find material that relates to it.

Hopefully the advanced users on this forum will join in and give us some guidance along the way. My skills are limited and I would be greatful for any help and guidance they could provide.


Ádh mór ort!
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Devlin 
Posted: 29-Jan-2008, 01:35 PM
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Is mise Devlin, agam ta an-athas Gailge.

(My name is Devlin, and I am Irish) Is misha Devlin, ahgum tah ahn-ahas Guailga.


Give me some time to add the "fadas" as I've heard you call them. I didn't know

what they were called. lol. I'll be using the ASCII Table, to add those.
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 29-Jan-2008, 02:58 PM
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Is mise Devlin - perfect
Tá an áthas Gaeilge - translates to something like I am happy (irish language) or something like that.

Té mé - I am or Is (for something that will not change)
Éireannach - Irish (as in Irishman)

Put it together like this - Is Éireannach mé. So you'd get: Is mise Devlin agus is Éireannach me!

for more on this subject: http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/articles/?p=20

Nice first try. Now try this: I am from (insert your city).

Get it right and I'll take the next one.

Slan
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 29-Jan-2008, 03:17 PM
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On the subject of fadas, try this:

Start
Control panel (classic view)
Regional and Language
Click Language tab
Click Details
Click Add
Drop-down Input language
Select English (United Kingdom)
Click OK
Click Apply
Click Language bar
Select - Show the language bar on the desktop
and select - Show additional language bar icons in the taskbar.

To apply a fada, right click on the EN (on the taskbar) and select EN(United Kingdom) then just use the alt key to the right of the spacebar and type the vowel

so - hold down the alt key while typing the vowel and you should get the fadas.

Let me know if this worked for you.

Slán
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Devlin 
Posted: 30-Jan-2008, 12:53 AM
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Tha mi á Sherman. (ha mi ah Sherman) I'm from Sherman.



How's that one? Not sure. smile.gif
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 30-Jan-2008, 02:28 PM
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Devlin. That would work perfectly if you were in Scotland and would probably be recognized by fluent speakers of other Gaelic languages. Be careful of your sources!

Is as Sherman mé.

Is....mé
as - from

I'm pretty sure this is the preferred way to state where you are from (originally from) In other words, I am from Boston but I live in Port Angeles now.
Is as Boston mé ach tá mé ina chónaí i Port Angeles anois.

All you experts feel free to chime in any time!

Anyway, let's try this: I like music and I like Guinness!
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Devlin 
Posted: 30-Jan-2008, 08:20 PM
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LOL I hadn't realized that I two different books here. biggrin.gif

I have a "Teach Me Irish" program too, which I hadn't gotten halfway through it

yet. So in the mean time I'll just leave the other one book alone. smile.gif

In Irish grammar book I only found one sentence that resembled, "As Maigh Eo ó

dhúchas mé" (I'm originally from Mayo). Which is why I had become confused at

first but then I found the sentence in "Teach Me Irish" Dictionary. I'll give this

another shot. I told others about this translation game.


Is maith liom ceol an is maith liom guinness. (Ish mah leeyum kawee ahn ish mah

leeyum guinness) I like music and I like guinness.
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 30-Jan-2008, 09:51 PM
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Maith thú! (good for you)
The only small detail I would change is to say agus (and) so you would get:
Is maith liom ceol agus is maith liom Guinness.
ceol - kyole

Ok, your turn!
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Devlin 
Posted: 30-Jan-2008, 10:23 PM
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One question, how is "an" used then.



My turn? Here it is:

Do you often watch Television?


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Guinness4me 
Posted: 31-Jan-2008, 10:51 PM
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To answer your question regarding "An" it is used in different ways.
to express very eg. An mhaith (very good)
or to express "the" eg. An t-am (the time)

OK, you put my grammatical skills to the test on this one. I had to dig out the books but I think I'm close.

An bhfeiceann tú teilifís go minic?
(un weckan too tell-a-feesh guh minick)

one other possibility:

An amharc tú teilifís go minic?

I'm not too sure on the usage of the verb. Experts feel free to jump in on this one.
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Devlin 
Posted: 01-Feb-2008, 12:56 AM
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I wanted thank you for getting me to actually break open my Irish Grammar book

again.

There's an excercise that I'de been working on and was a bit hung up on

The directions says to write the correct particle and the correct verb and then it

gives the rest of the translation to Irish. I looked it up and you are correct, only

small detail though, the book says:

An bhféachann tú ar an teilifís go minic?

I had a little trouble with (amharc) though. When I went to look it up in the "Teach

Me Irish" software dictionary, it says, (To look) but it doesn't give any examples of

its usage. Anyway, your turn. biggrin.gif
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Guinness4me 
Posted: 01-Feb-2008, 05:36 PM
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It is nice to get back into the studies. You had me digging on the last one but things started to come back to me as I went along. So, thanks to you too.
Go raibh míle maith agat!

OK, try this one:
State your age and wether or not you are married.

eg. I am 40 years old and I am married.

I was thinking that after this one, we could start a dialog. First person would just say hello - how are you kind of thing and take it from there. Use the text book you have and go through a natural progression with increasing difficulty.

Just a thought. Let me know what you think.

I'm hoping others will join in soon. I think this will be an excellent learning tool.

Slán go fóill.
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