Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )



Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> I Have A 9 Year Old Schipperke, Took him to the vet and found out he has
Bookmark and Share
Rindy 
Posted: 29-Jul-2009, 11:11 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Peasant
*

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 0
Joined: 27-Jan-2004
ZodiacBirch


female





Megacolon. I was wondering if anyone out there is dealing with the same situation and what you feed your dog. He way almost on the way out. We could give him a enima unsure.gif I think. He's pretty wild. Any how would love some feeding tips. or things you buy, what kind of foods? HELP HELP HEEELLLP>.. laugh.gif

Thank you. Hope some one has some ideas.

Slainte
PMEmail Poster               
Top
TheCarolinaScotsman 
Posted: 30-Jul-2009, 07:02 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 2,508
Joined: 13-Jun-2003
ZodiacBirch

Realm: North Carolina

male

Medieval Kingdom
Rank #2
2,147,483,647 Gold!






Rindy, I found the following two articles on the web. Most of the other entries were for cats.

Q: Dear Dr. Mike, My brother has a springer spaniel that has been diagnosed with megacolon. He has taken the dog to many vets and even to Michigan State University for treatment. The best treatment he has been able to come up with is a daily enema. Why is this ailment so different in dogs than in cats? And, as always we are looking for any new cures or ideas on cures that we can get. Any information that you have on this ailment would certainly be helpful as well as any suggestions for cure. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration. Matthew

A: Matthew- Megacolon is very different in dog than it is in cats. I am not able to explain the differences because I don't really understand why the problem occurs in cats or in dogs unless there is an obvious cause like an obstruction, tumor, etc. Someone probably can explain this but if so, I haven't found a really clear explanation in any texts I have!

Anyway, the major difference in treatment is the general success of surgery for this condition in cats and the lack of success for surgical correction in dogs.

Cisapride (Propulsid Rx) has been recommended for this condition but I have seen articles saying it should not be used or is ineffective, too. Personally, I'd be hard pressed not to try it if I was treating a dog with this condition because there are few alternatives. There may be benefits from using ranitidine (Zantac Rx) or nizatidine (Axid Rx) may help with this by increasing intestinal mobility, according to information posted on the Veterinary Information Network. These were the only two medications of this type mentioned (famotidine, Pepcid Rx, and cimetidine, Tagamet Rx are other medications in this this group of "H2" blockers but the post suggested that the Zantac and Axid may be the only ones with this effect.

I know this isn't much help. You have worked hard to get good advice and I wish there was more to give.
Mike Richards, DVM


J Small Anim Pract 2008,Dec,01;49(12):618-24; (PMID: 18793255)
Nemeth, T ; Solymosi, N ; Balka, G;
The Journal of small animal practice (ISSN: 0022-4510)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the long-term results of subtotal colectomy for acquired hypertrophic megacolon in the dog. METHODS: Eight dogs with acquired hypertrophic megacolon underwent subtotal colectomy with preservation of the ileocolic junction. Long-term follow-up was obtained by clinical records and telephone interviews with the owners. RESULTS: Eight large-breed dogs (age range: 6 to 12 years; mean age: 10.75 years) were enrolled. The use of bone meal, low levels of exercise, chronic constipation with dyschesia and tenesmus refractory to medical management were factors predisposing dogs to acquired hypertrophic megacolon. The diagnosis was confirmed in all animals by abdominal palpation, plain radiography and postoperative histopathological findings. There were no intraoperative complications. One dog died as a result of septic peritonitis. The clinical conditions (that is, resolution of obstipation and stool consistency) of the remaining seven dogs were improved at discharge; all animals returned to normal defecation in five to 10 weeks (mean: 7.3 weeks) and were alive 11 to 48 months (mean: 40.5 months) after surgery. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Predominantly bony diet and/or low levels of physical activity may predispose dogs to acquired hypertrophic megacolon. Our results emphasise the long-term effectiveness of subtotal colectomy with preservation of the ileocolic junction in this condition.





--------------------
TheCarolinaScotsman


Ya'll drive safe and come back soon.
PMEmail PosterMy Photo Album               
Top
valpal59 
Posted: 30-Jul-2009, 08:51 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 3,533
Joined: 18-Sep-2003
ZodiacHolly

Realm: Texas Panhandle

female





Rindy.
I am sorry about your dog. This is the first I have ever heard of this condition. I hope that someone is able to help you. Keep us posted. hug.gif

Val


--------------------
user posted imageuser posted imageuser posted image

"He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart.

You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion."

Author Unknown
PMEmail Poster               View my Facebook Profile.View My Space Profile.
Top
Rindy 
Posted: 30-Jul-2009, 09:18 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Peasant
*

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 0
Joined: 27-Jan-2004
ZodiacBirch


female





Thank you for this article CarolinaScotsman. It sounds like dogs have it worse. I just know he got really sick, and lost a lot of weight. I guess I will just go with a high fiber diet and hope for the best. I don't think I could do the enema everyday.

The dog seems to still be enjoying life and doesn't act like he is in pain, now anyhow. I suppose if his colon fills back up he will get ill again. May have to put him under. Schipperkes are suppose to live to 16 to 17 years.

I guess I will go one day at a time. I really appreciate the help.

Thanks for your kind thoughts valpal. I had not heard of this either.

Slainte
PMEmail Poster               
Top
DesertRose 
Posted: 11-Nov-2009, 02:21 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 6,913
Joined: 09-Nov-2003
ZodiacAlder

Realm: The desert of Arizona

female





Holy cow, Rindy! I have never heard of this condition. Hope you find what's best to do to keep your dog healthy and happy. Keep us posted. You must be in a fret right now. Well I would be!

take care!


--------------------
Fine art & photography by DESERT ROSE IMAGES
http://www.desertrose-images.com
PMEmail PosterUsers WebsiteMy Photo Album               
Top
0 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

 








Celtic RadioTM broadcasts through Live365.com and StreamLicensing.com which are officially licensed under SoundExchange, ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and SOCAN.
2014 Celtic Radio Network, Highlander Radio, Celtic Moon, Celtic Dance, Ye O' Celtic Pub and Celt-Rock-Radio.
All rights and trademarks reserved. Read our Privacy Policy.
Celtic Graphics 2014, Cari Buziak


Link to CelticRadio.net!
Link to CelticRadio.net
View Broadcast Status and Statistics!

Best Viewed With IE 8.0 (1680 x 1050 Resolution), Javascript & Cookies Enabled.


[Home] [Top]

Celtic Hearts Gallery | Celtic Mates Dating | My Celtic Friends | Celtic Music Radio | Family Heraldry | Medival Kingdom | Top Celtic Sites | Web Celt Blog | Video Celt