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ShintyBoy Posted on: 15-Jun-2006, 07:36 PM

Replies: 9
Views: 906
Shinty and Field Hockey though they may have similar roots have evolved into very different sports, with widely differing rules and defintely different governing bodies. Many of the the most desireable techniques used in Shinty would be called as fouls in Field Hockey. To view the rules of Shinty you can go www.norcalshinty.com or to the governing body in Scotland web site: www.shinty.com. One difference in particular is in Shinty you are allowed to strike the ball with your caman (stick) over your head and I believe in Field Hockey the stick must be kept below the level of your shoulders or waist. We have former Field Hockey players in our club and they all say they much prefer Shinty over Field Hockey and would never go back it. In Shinty the Goal Keeper does not wear all of padding and protection that a Field Hockey Goalie does. The balls are different with a Shinty ball being similar in construction to an American Hard Baseball only slightly smaller in diameter. The Shinty stick or caman is beveled (triangular) and both sides of the stick are used to strike the ball, where in field hockey you only use one side of the stick. You can see photos of camans and balls in the equipment section of www.norcalshinty.com.
  Forum: Festival & Games  ·  Post Preview: #152216

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ShintyBoy Posted on: 15-Jun-2006, 07:18 PM

Replies: 23
Views: 2,658
In Highland or Country if you dance with correct technique you should not suffer from pain or injury, however a very small percentage of dancers actually dance with good body technique, Many advance level dancers have bad habits creep into their dancing which ultimately leads to pain to injury. Foot Pain in Scottish dancing either in Highland or Country can be caused by many factors, some have already been covered in this thread already, but in over 10 years of teaching dance I have found that in both younger and older dancers one way to be proactive in preventing the pain in addition to proper warm up and cool down is being aware of properly flexing your heel when you land. In both Highland and Country dancing you dance on the ball of your foot with the heel up, when you land the heel should flex downward at least 2 inches (without touching the floor), this allows the force of impact to be absorbed by the whole leg and foot and not just the lower leg and foot. Dancers who do not flex their heels (this means flexing the ankle) in addition to foot pain, will eventually suffer from shin splints or stress fractures. Another way to check if you are landing correctly is how loud you are when you land, good dancers hardly make a sound whether they are Highland or Country, someone on the road to injury will make a loud thumping sound when they land. The tendency to land in correctly increases as you get tired and should be paid even greater attention to when they occurs. In addition to all of this proper body alignment from the head down to the feet is crucial, the ankles, hips and shoulders should all be lined up, when one dances with the shoulders or the hips in to far in front of the ankles the chances of injury go up exponentially. One needs to keep their head up, the head is the heaviest part of the body and once again having it out of proper alignment with the rest of the body will quickly lead to injuries. Much of what I have said applies to preventing knee injuries as well. In addition to the above, to proactively prevent knee injuries one should make sure you are turning out from the hips and not the knees or ankles. When hopping or jumping make sure the ball of the foot is in alignment with the knee, pigeon toeness or sickling leads to injury. Extreme alignment to the outside is dangerous as well.
  Forum: Highland Dance  ·  Post Preview: #152214

ShintyBoy Posted on: 15-Jun-2006, 06:48 PM

Replies: 28
Views: 8,437
I own three Kilts my two favorites are not my clan tartan:

Fort William Tartan (District Tartan) - most favorite

Hunting Stewart, though claimed by the Stewarts it is also considered a District Tartan as well in Scotland. Was worn by the Royal Scots Regiment and is still worn by the Canadian Scottish Regiment - my second favorite

Lord of the Isles Hunting Tartan (one of the many Clan Donald tartans) is my third kilt.

Slainte,
Elheran
  Forum: Highland Dance  ·  Post Preview: #152210

ShintyBoy Posted on: 15-Jun-2006, 06:42 PM

Replies: 2
Views: 1,347
Hello,
I am with the Piedmont Highlanders, a non competitive Highland Dance class located near Oakland, California. We teach all of the dances to a correct and high standard, we just have a different focus than competing. It's more of returning to the roots of the dancing when it was still a contemporary dance form. Many of our dancers do it for exercise and the pure joy of it and some don't even dance outside of class, though we also have those who do perform with both the class and/or other performing groups. We actually do have a couple of people who compete in the Advanced Level class, but once again the focus of the class is purely on dancing Highland and National dances with out being pressured to compete by the instructors. There is so much more to dancing than the competitions, plus we provide a place where people who have worked their way up through the levels of competition can still dance after they stop competing. Dancers put many hours over a period of years developing themselves, why quit dancing when you no longer wish to compete? The experienced dancers have so much to share with the newer dancers. We put on a traditional ceilidh once a year which attracts two pipe bands, solo pipers, Scottish and Irish Musicians, singers and dancers. The evening is filled with both the solo and social dances of Scotland and Ireland, songs, poetry and music from all of the Celtic Nations. No two ceilidhs have been the same as we keep to the tradition of spontaneity and do not over plan or arrange, believe it or not it's hard work to make it so, but totally worth it. The mass Fling danced in a circle for all who wish has grown so large inner and outer circles are required to accommodate all who want to dance. It is truly a magical evening, expatriate Scots attending for their first time have come up afterwards and told us they never expected to experience such a thing outside of Scotland.
  Forum: Highland Dance  ·  Post Preview: #152209

ShintyBoy Posted on: 09-Jun-2006, 06:36 PM

Replies: 1
Views: 995
The ancient sport of Camanachd or Shinty is spreading to North America, though originally played in the 18th and 19th century by Scottish immigrants, the sport died out, however it is enjoying a revival. Two teams, Northern California Camanachd Club (NCCC) and Morro Bay Shinty Club, play regularly on the Highland Games circuit in California. On 04 September 2005 the first international Shinty match between a team from USA and a team from Scotland on Scottish soil was played. The event was hosted by the Blairgowrie Highland Games where the Northern California Camanachd Club (NCCC) played exhibition matches against the Tayforth Shinty Club, with Tayforth victorious. This match was followed by the Northern California Camanachd Club participating in the first inaugural Annual Edinburgh East Lothian Levenhall Six a Side Shinty Tournament in Musselburgh on 05 September 2005, other teams were Aberdour and Edinburgh University Women’s team. Edinburgh East Lothian won the tournament with the NCCC coming in 3rd out of 4 teams. As the teams in Scotland have switched from a winter schedule to a summer schedule more visitors to Scotland are seeing the sport and returning very interested in it. There is interest in forming clubs in Houston (Texas), Santa Monica and Bakersfield (Calif), Seattle (Washington), Utah and the Gulf Coast.

For more information:

http://www.norcalshinty.com/

http://www.houstonshinty.com/

http://www.geocities.com/sloscots/SLOshinty.htm

http://www.uscamanachd.org/

http://www.shinty.com
  Forum: United States of America  ·  Post Preview: #151700

ShintyBoy Posted on: 09-Jun-2006, 06:22 PM

Replies: 2
Views: 817
Shinty or in Gaelic Camanachd or Iomain has strong Gaelic language and cultural ties and is currently being broadcasted in an 8 part Gaelic sports series on BBC Scotland featuring shinty and Highland league football, etc. There is also a thirty minute programme dedicated to shinty ("An Caman") which is broadcast on the digital channel Tele G. Many shinty fans did not have access to this channel and so "An Caman" is streamed on the website - www.mnetelevision.com . There is a section dedicated to Sport and every Friday at 18:30 we add the latest "An Caman" programme.

Information on the sport and gettting involved can be found at:

Scotland: www.shinty.com

USA:

http://www.uscamanachd.org/

http://www.norcalshinty.com/

http://www.houstonshinty.com/

http://www.geocities.com/sloscots/SLOshinty.htm


  Forum: Scottish Gaelic  ·  Post Preview: #151699

ShintyBoy Posted on: 09-Jun-2006, 06:15 PM

Replies: 9
Views: 906
You can view Shinty matches from Scotland on line at:

Shinty is currently being broadcasted in an 8 part Gaelic sports series on BBC Scotland featuring shinty and Highland league football, etc. There is also a thirty minute programme dedicated to shinty ("An Caman") which is broadcast on the digital channel Tele G. Many shinty fans did not have access to this channel and so "An Caman" is streamed on the website - www.mnetelevision.com . There is a section dedicated to Sport and every Friday at 18:30 we add the latest "An Caman" programme.
  Forum: Festival & Games  ·  Post Preview: #151698

ShintyBoy Posted on: 09-Jun-2006, 06:09 PM

Replies: 9
Views: 906
Hello,
Our new web site is www.norcalshinty.com
Some news from the last year

Shinty is also spreading in North America, though originally played in the 18th and 19th century by Scottish immigrants, the sport died out, however it is enjoying a revival. Two teams, Northern California Camanachd Club (NCCC) and San Luis Obispo Shinty Club, play regularly on the Highland Games circuit in California. On 04 September 2005 the first international Shinty match between a team from USA and a team from Scotland on Scottish soil was played. The event was hosted by the Blairgowrie Highland Games where the Northern California Camanachd Club (NCCC) played exhibition matches against the Tayforth Shinty Club, with Tayforth victorious. This match was followed by the Northern California Camanachd Club participating in the first inaugural Annual Edinburgh East Lothian Levenhall Six a Side Shinty Tournament in Musselburgh on 05 September 2005, other teams were Aberdour and Edinburgh University Women’s team. Edinburgh East Lothian won the tournament with the NCCC coming in 3rd out of 4 teams. As the teams in Scotland have switched from a winter schedule to a summer schedule more visitors to Scotland are seeing the sport and returning very interested in it. There is interest in forming clubs in Houston (Texas), Santa Monica and Bakersfield (Calif), Seattle (Washington), Utah and the Gulf Coast.
  Forum: Festival & Games  ·  Post Preview: #151697

ShintyBoy Posted on: 07-Feb-2002, 02:53 PM

Replies: 9
Views: 906
We have our web site up and running:

http://www.foundrysite.com/shinty/

Please drop by and check it out
  Forum: Festival & Games  ·  Post Preview: #811

ShintyBoy Posted on: 24-Jan-2002, 05:42 PM

Replies: 9
Views: 906
Well we made the Strathspey and Badenoch Herald in Scotland. A feature article concerning our activities has made the paper. This paper also covers the two arch rival Shinty teams in Scotland: Kingussie and Newtonmore.
  Forum: Festival & Games  ·  Post Preview: #685

ShintyBoy Posted on: 17-Jan-2002, 12:44 PM

Replies: 9
Views: 906
Shinty is not normally played at Higland Games in Scotland, generally Shinty or Camanachd have regularly matches on local pitches (fields). Since we are trying to recruit more players for now Highland Games are one of our best places for exposure, but our long range goal is to have Highland Games only be about 50% of matches and devolp a league to play similar to Scotland. As far as I know the only Shinty Clubs up and running are those on the west coast, us in Northern California and one in Oregon. I have heard rumors of a team in the mid west, but have not be able to track anyone down. We would be more than happy to help others get clubs together in other parts of the US. The more clubs, the more likely we can get some of the better Shinty teams over from Scotland to play exhibition matches. There is some similarity to Field Hockey, but the former field Hockey Players who play with us say the two sporst have some big differences as well. Shinty is more aerial than Field Hockey, with rules closer to International Football (Scoccer). BBC Scotland does extensive coverage of the matches, but unfortunately they don't make it on to BBC America yet. The triangular head of the caman (stick) makes for interesting ball handling capabilities as compared to a Field Hockey Stick. The offical site for the Camanchd Association, which is the governing body of Shinty or Camanchd in Scotland is: www.Shinty.com. There are excellent photos of the matches on the site. FYI: There is also an International match between Scotland's national Shinty Team and Ireland's national Hurling Team, playing by combined rules from each sport. I have seem these matches and they are truly fast paced and exciting to watch.
  Forum: Festival & Games  ·  Post Preview: #510

ShintyBoy Posted on: 14-Jan-2002, 12:29 AM

Replies: 9
Views: 906
SHINTY
(Camanachd)

Scotland?s Oldest Sport

Learn and play the ancient sport of the Scottish Gaels

Camanchd or Shinty is a game of the stick and ball variety and has been played in the Scottish Highlands for many years. Its origins date back 2,000 years in Scotland, and several other sports have evolved from or been influenced by Shinty, notably Golf and Ice Hockey. Shinty is also related to Field Hockey and Irish Hurling.

The Northern California Camanachd Club has Coed Teams playing in the North and South Bays. We play by the modern Camanachd Association (Scotland) rules and would invite anyone interested to participate. Our goal is to provide a traditional Scottish team sport, in addition to the usual Scottish Heavy Field type events, for Bay Area events.

A brief description of the game

Two teams (most commonly of six or twelve players a side) play on a field of similar proportions and size to a soccer pitch. Players use Camans (curved sticks with a triangular cross section) to strike the shinty ball, either in the air or on the ground, with the intention of scoring goals. Like soccer, the goal nets are guarded by a goal keeper,  the only player allowed to use hands. A Shinty match is either 15-30 minutes (for six-a-side) or 90 minutes (for twelve-a-side) in length, divided into two halves with a short break between them. Loaner Camans will be available for new players.

Contact for more information
  Forum: Festival & Games  ·  Post Preview: #508

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