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Catriona 
Posted: 22-Sep-2003, 10:10 AM
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I'm having few friends around for a cup of tea and a natter after work.... nothing

This post has been edited by Catriona on 28-Jul-2004, 05:54 PM
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Elspeth 
Posted: 23-Sep-2003, 05:32 PM
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wink.gif Again, pardon my ignorance. What is treacle? Is it like molasses or more like our Kayro (corn) syrup? And while I'm asking... what are caster sugar and imperial milk? And what the heck... what's SR flour and 8oz. translates to how many cups?
I've read of treacle scones, but have never tasted them and I thought it would be fun to give it a try if I can come up with the ingredients.


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Catriona 
Posted: 23-Sep-2003, 06:03 PM
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QUOTE (Elspeth @ Sep 23 2003, 11:32 PM)
wink.gif Again, pardon my ignorance. What is treacle? Is it like molasses or more like our Kayro (corn) syrup? And while I'm asking... what are caster sugar and imperial milk? And what the heck... what's SR flour and 8oz. translates to how many cups?
I've read of treacle scones, but have never tasted them and I thought it would be fun to give it a try if I can come up with the ingredients.

Treacle is a very dark syrup - maybe molasses is near it, by I'm not at all sure!

I think your 'syrup' is closer to our 'Golden Syrup' (usually made by Tate and Lyle in the UK)

The interesting thing is that the famous British pudding called treacle tart is not made with treacle, but with Golden syrup! That's us, contrary to a fault!

I use Imperial measures (ie that which was prevalent in the UK before metric measurement)... this is slightly different to US measurements which have the same unit name - for instance, an Imperial pint is less than a US pint... this would obviously make a difference to any recipe, so I always mention that I am using Imperial rather than US measures!

Caster sugar is a finer grade than granulated, but not as fine as icing sugar... I THINK I recall an American poster saying it was confectioner's sugar....

Self raising flour is flour with an added raising agent - ie you don't have to add bicarb of soda or baking powder to the flour!

Only the US works in 'cups' - we use either metric - grammes and kilos - or Imperial - ie pounds (lb) and ounces (oz)!

I understand that all the British ingredients can be found in the USA, but at speciality stores or importers....

Treacle scones have a wonderful 'toffee' like flavour - quite different from my usual plain scones or scones with currants in them!
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3Ravens 
Posted: 24-Sep-2003, 08:23 AM
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Caster sugar is more like superfine sugar that you would put in ice tea. Confectionary sugar is powdered sugar, what Cat would call icing sugar. If you can't find superfine sugar, just put your regular sugar in a blender and give it a couple of short whizzes, and it will work.
I don't know if treacle and molasses are close. I'm going to try it with the unsulfered molasses, I'll let you know how it turns out.
It took me a little while to figure out what SR was, myself. I'm not used to seeing it abbreviated. wink.gif
I got out my handy-dandy scale, and 8 oz is about 1 and 1/3 cups of flour spooned out and leveled, not scooped up with the cup.
An oz of sugar is a scant 1/4 cup(about 3 and 1/2 tablespoons)
A quarter pint will be a little less than 1/2 cup (about 3 and 1/2 liquid oz)
No idea what the equivalent of Golden syrup would be....
Hpoe this helps!


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3Ravens 
Posted: 24-Sep-2003, 08:26 AM
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QUOTE

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Elspeth 
Posted: 24-Sep-2003, 08:38 AM
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Thanks.
I was taught to cook by the 'handfuls' and 'until it looks right' method so metric and Imperial is way beyond my ken.
Now to find a store that carries these things. Too bad there isn't a Scottish restaurant around the corner where I could 'try before I bake'.
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Catriona 
Posted: 24-Sep-2003, 04:30 PM
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This post has been edited by Catriona on 28-Jul-2004, 05:55 PM
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Elspeth 
Posted: 24-Sep-2003, 04:43 PM
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My grandmother as well was a renowned baker and though her maiden name was Parry (Welsh), her mother was an Anderson!
However, since they emigrated in 1804, the traditional Scottish recipes have long since disappeared from the family.
I like the description of your bakeries. Another reason to visit Scotland someday!
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Guest_Patricia KP
Posted: 01-Oct-2003, 06:32 PM
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biggrin.gif I enjoy reading everyone's comments. I am from a Scottish family which came to the US in the 1600's. I'm guessing it was probably McNicoll / McIver which is two genreations from me and from there who knows? I was looking for a recipe for my son for a class that he is studying about "heritage". It is fun exploring this with him. I found this site by accident and joined! Looking forward to being a member. Patti KP
               
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Guest_Patricia KP
Posted: 01-Oct-2003, 06:34 PM
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biggrin.gif I enjoy reading everyone's comments. I am from a Scottish family which came to the US in the 1600's. I'm guessing it was probably McNicoll / McIver which is two generations from me and from there who knows? My family also owned a bakery and shipping/import business here is the US. I was looking for a recipe for my son for a class that he is studying about "heritage". It is fun exploring this with him. I found this site by accident and joined! Looking forward to being a member. Patti KP
               
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Guest_Patricia KP
Posted: 01-Oct-2003, 06:34 PM
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biggrin.gif I enjoy reading everyone's comments. I am from a Scottish family which came to the US in the 1600's. I'm guessing it was probably McNicoll / McIver which is two generations from me and from there who knows? My family also owned a bakery and shipping/import business here is the US. I was looking for a recipe for my son for a class that he is studying about "heritage". It is fun exploring this with him. I found this site by accident and joined! Looking forward to being a member. Patti KP
               
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Elspeth 
Posted: 01-Oct-2003, 07:14 PM
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I don't know if you found the recipe you needed, but when I was researching I came across The Highlander's Cookbook Recipes From Scotland by Sheila MacNiven Cameron in my son's library. I liked it and bought a copy through a used bookstore. Gave this colonist an idea as to what my ancestors ate. Now I want to go to Scotland and have a chance to experience it for myself.
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davidm 
Posted: 01-Oct-2003, 11:53 PM
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YUM! Looking forward to trying your recipe. thumbs_up.gif How do you think it will work at 6200 ft above sea level inthe highlands of Wyoming, USA?

Yours aye,

david
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Catriona 
Posted: 02-Oct-2003, 03:19 AM
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Well, David, I'm not sure whether or not the altitude will have any effect on the way the scones turn out..... BUT, I've made them in places as diverse as the Gulf, Singapore, Greece, Italy...... oh and England!!! tongue.gif

I hope you enjoy them. I have posted other scone recipes further down in this forum - you might like to give them a try after you have experimented with this recipe!

BTW - for those of you who might be interested, the word 'scone' is pronounced to rhyme with 'gone' - not 'bone'.... biggrin.gif
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Posted: 02-Nov-2003, 06:13 PM
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Another Scotsman by blood here in the US. My 6th great-grandfather came over from Baldernock, Stirlingshire in 1750. I used to use treacle in some of my home brew stout beer recipes. Our US molasses is a bit less concentrated. Will try out the recipe. YUM!

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