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Celtic Radio Community > Polls > Haggis!


Posted by: Macfive 23-May-2005, 10:08 PM
Ok, let's see who has tried everyone's favorite Scottish dish. Or if you have not tried it, do you plan on having a little taste of the haggis? thumbs_up.gif

biggrin.gif

Posted by: dundee 24-May-2005, 08:15 AM
i would like to try it .... maybe so i can at least spew it from my mouth ....
hey its got to be better than poster_spam.gif

ps... dont sit across from me at the rabby burns dinner..... laugh.gif

Posted by: gnomecelt 24-May-2005, 01:17 PM
When I was Working in a store!! That makes diners for people my bose did get the question of he can make hagis!! Ad that time we didn't know what is was. But my boss fixt it, and of course I couldn't let it to try and it whas not bad!!

Greetings Gnome Celt Joyce

Posted by: stevenpd 24-May-2005, 01:24 PM
At a Highland gathering with a dram of Scottish whiskey. This taste was veified as authentic by my father-in-law with the last name of Angus. From Saltcoats, Scotland and a former member of the Black Watch. Looking forward to more actually!

Posted by: erickbloodax 24-May-2005, 10:10 PM
In the PI I ate tuyo, (dried fish) and rice. I had read a story about a man who had been unjustly sued for libel, and all they could afford to eat was tuyo and rice, he did not complain because he said "It tastes like truth."

I would like to try hagis, but i am afraid I will have to learn to prepare it myself. I think it must taste like the highlands.

Posted by: Aaediwen 25-May-2005, 06:54 PM
Not yet. One day I do plan to try it, but until just over a month ago, I'd never had lamb/mutton.

Posted by: Moon Child 26-May-2005, 09:39 AM
I haven't tried it yet but just hope that this September at the Highland Games here in town they have it!!! I'm looking forward to trying it!!

Posted by: Shadows 26-May-2005, 03:45 PM
The reputation of the haggis is greatly exagerated! If you were to eat some without knowing what it was you would either like it or hate it... one never knows until one tries! It is kind of like eating tonge... if I were to give you a sandwhich with brown mustard and swiss cheese and after you ate it told you.... well haggis is like that, it seems to be the thought of what it is that turns folks off...

Posted by: BluegrassLady 06-Jun-2005, 07:46 PM
Yes, I tried it just this past weekend, at the Glasgow Highland Games. It tasted fine. I was curious about it since I saw the question about it here. smile.gif

Posted by: MacErca 16-Jun-2005, 02:28 PM
Yes I have tried it, both here in the states and in Scotland and I must say that I found rather pleasing.

For those interested there is a place here in Texas that makes Haggis, and it is very good, the name is Caledonian Kitchen.

www.caledoniankitchen.com

Posted by: stoirmeil 19-Jun-2005, 03:47 PM
I actually made the stuff for a local Burns night years ago ("local" back then was Providence, Rhode Island). It was a last minute deal, the company we ordered it from didn't come through and we had 24 hours to come up with it. I have a lot of stories. . . especially going to the sausage factory looking for a casing. tongue.gif They really do sing when you poke them as they're boiling -- not unlike pipes.

I had out-of-this-world haggis in Fort William, on a day when you could not see the top of Ben Nevis for the mizzling cold rain and fog (must have been about 45 degrees outside, in August!) We were so cold and tired and wet I would have eaten sheep jobbies, but this haggis was full of pepper and it was just exactly what the weather required. (The waitress refused to bring it to me until I asked three times, then she stood there watching me eat it. biggrin.gif )

Posted by: CelticRose 20-Jun-2005, 12:05 AM
I haven't had it yet. But I plan to attend the Highland games in northern Arizona next month in July and I hear they will have a whisky tasting and haggis, so I will be there to taste both! wink.gif biggrin.gif Will let you know what I think after then.

Posted by: wicwisworhun 29-Oct-2005, 06:00 AM
welll lets now haggis + squre sausages+ potatos scons+and black puding all on the same plate

go go go haggis go

to all keeep it tribal

Posted by: Shamalama 04-Jan-2006, 01:23 PM
I tried the Dreaded Haggis at the Stone Mountain Highlands Games a few years ago.

- The actual color of green that I turned is not found in nature.

- My wife had to move away from me from the smell coming off my plate.

- The "taste" lingered in my sinuses for hours afterwards, continuing my nausea.

- I can best describe it as "liver meatloaf".

My entire family has always said that I have an iron stomach in that I can eat just about anything. But I learned that this characteristic did not include the Dreaded Haggis.

I will be willing to entertain the argument that I simply got a bad batch of the stuff, that the "good" haggis is actually a good-tasting food. And with that I am willing to give it one, and only one, more try. But my gentle bride has declared that I will do so without her pleasant company.


Posted by: Sekhmet 04-Jan-2006, 02:59 PM
...you had a bad batch of the stuff.

It's sausage. Or, maybe to be a bit more accurate, it's kinda like scrapple and sausage put together. We have it at the Games every year, though if I remember correctly, the lights (lungs) and a couple other items had to be brought in from Canada or procured from a friendly butcher here. Apparently it's illegal to sell some organ meats and well...ya need it in haggis. Ours comes out rather mild-flavored with the possible exception of the pepper.

We slice it up to eat as is, or break up bits of it to put on crackers for the faint of heart to try first.

Posted by: stoirmeil 05-Jan-2006, 09:06 AM
QUOTE (Sekhmet @ 04-Jan-2006, 03:59 PM)
It's sausage. Or, maybe to be a bit more accurate, it's kinda like scrapple and sausage put together. We have it at the Games every year, though if I remember correctly, the lights (lungs) and a couple other items had to be brought in from Canada or procured from a friendly butcher here. Apparently it's illegal to sell some organ meats and well...ya need it in haggis. Ours comes out rather mild-flavored with the possible exception of the pepper.


That's a point -- the scottish stuff is much more robust, with all the various kinds of offal available for it. We can use liver and maybe ground heart, although I don't think kidney would taste right, but you can't get lungs and you usually can't get a stomach to boil it in either. But let's face it -- for people who hate liver or other organ meat, it's a tough sell no matter what. And a really bad batch would put you off forever.

Posted by: CelticRose 07-Jan-2006, 01:14 AM
I had the pleasure of trying haggis at the Highland games in July. Now how accurate it was, I have no clue. But I must tell you I LOVED it and thought it was really really good! I look forward to trying the *real* dish one day! wink.gif

Posted by: AyaLove 20-Jan-2006, 01:56 AM
Never, yuk

Posted by: bob4328 22-Jan-2006, 08:04 PM
Yes, I ordered it off the internet from britishfoods.com for last years Burns Day. I ate Haggis and drank single malt Scot Whisky (alone, since my wife was grossed out). I also had 'tatties and neeps as a side dish. She was good enough to prepare the side dish (from a recipe off the net) and the haggis was simple enough to steam by following the directions on the packaging.
I enjoyed it, but it was sooo expensive to order on the net due to the shipping costs that I won't do it again.
I may try some of the recipes you can find on the net and make my own next time.
Some of the 'mock" ones seem a little more civilized thumbs_up.gif

Posted by: Sekhmet 24-Jan-2006, 10:51 PM
I've suddenly been taken with the wild idea to make one. Don't ask me why...now let's see how many teeth I have to pull to get all the ingredients.

Posted by: crazykiltedcelt 16-Mar-2006, 06:10 PM
AYE!!!!LAddies Inot only enjoy eating it I make my own so Ican enjoy it when ever I feel the need for a taste of the home land. thumbs_up.gif

Posted by: stevenpd 16-Mar-2006, 11:30 PM
So, where exactly, do you get a sheeps stomach?

Posted by: Dogshirt 17-Mar-2006, 12:07 AM
From a SHEEP laddie,from a sheep! wink.gif


beer_mug.gif

Posted by: stevenpd 17-Mar-2006, 10:43 AM
Must have been that last green beer . . . . . .


Posted by: stoirmeil 17-Mar-2006, 10:54 AM
laugh.gif

You can't get a sheep stomach in America legally from a butcher, as far as I know. From a farmer who's been butchering, maybe. But just use a large intestinal beef casing, which a butcher will get for you with a bit of notice, or a sausage factory has them.

If you're drinking green beer with your haggis, you deserve whatever comes up after. puke.gif Erin go bluuuurrrgggaaaaahhhh!

Posted by: sisterknight 17-Mar-2006, 07:51 PM
oh ya baby ya!!!!started young.....and now appreciate with with a wee dram or three.....only scotsmen know how to make the stuff right though.!!!

Posted by: Dogshirt 17-Mar-2006, 08:14 PM
Green beer shid bae ootlawed! Wha wid dae sich a thing tae a fine bevrige as BEER! disgust.gif beer.gif


beer_mug.gif

Posted by: sisterknight 17-Mar-2006, 08:18 PM
once again i must agree with you man.......only a weenie would even think about putting something like that in your mouth!!!doesn't anyone listen to their mothers about putting stranger things in their mouths anymore????

Posted by: crazykiltedcelt 01-Apr-2006, 05:23 PM
I cook my haggis in ether oven bag or dospolable pie with fiol top of it

Posted by: jedibowers 01-Apr-2006, 09:55 PM
I love to eat haggis. I have tried several different versions of it and each one is good in its own way. We have a Scottish resturant here in Indianapolis so I go there sometimes for haggis. I work near this resturant so sometimes I go and order just haggis and scottish eggs for lunch.

Greg

Posted by: stoirmeil 03-Apr-2006, 08:14 AM
It varies a lot depending on who makes it. It needs to be hot (not lukewarm), not too fatty (but not too dry), and it needs lots of pepper. It also helps considerably if it's highland-ish outside, weatherwise -- dank cold, mizzling rain, heavy fog, seawind. Nothing makes the haggis taste better than that, except maybe the shot of single malt that goes with it.

Posted by: Perkeo 09-Apr-2006, 05:20 PM
I have tried and liked Haggis and spam for that matter. laugh.gif

http://www.mailmsg.com/SPAM_python.htm

Posted by: zeryx 25-Jul-2006, 11:19 AM
How appropriate that you started this poll on my birthday wink.gif I LOVE haggis ... it's soooo yummy. If we have a chip shop meal I always go for a haggis supper (deep fried haggis in batter) ... my preferred option is the spicy haggis smile.gif

Posted by: stoirmeil 25-Jul-2006, 11:23 AM
QUOTE (zeryx @ 25-Jul-2006, 12:19 PM)
How appropriate that you started this poll on my birthday wink.gif I LOVE haggis ... it's soooo yummy. If we have a chip shop meal I always go for a haggis supper (deep fried haggis in batter) ... my preferred option is the spicy haggis smile.gif

Deep fried haggis in batter? Spicy? At a chip shop? smile.gif I like the sound of this.
Got a recipe? How about putting it over in the recipes thread under Scottish recipes?

Posted by: Rindy 25-Jul-2006, 11:33 AM
I have still to try it...dunno..

and Happy Birthday zeryx! Your profile reads different hope it isn't wrong. Let us know we would be Happy to wish you a Happy Birthday in the birthday thread...

zerex- very nice picture your beautiful......

Good idea on the recipes Stoirmeil

Slainte smile.gif

Posted by: zeryx 25-Jul-2006, 04:33 PM
QUOTE (Rindy @ 25-Jul-2006, 06:33 PM)
I have still to try it...dunno..

and Happy Birthday zeryx! Your profile reads different hope it isn't wrong. Let us know we would be Happy to wish you a Happy Birthday in the birthday thread...

zerex- very nice picture your beautiful......

Good idea on the recipes Stoirmeil

Slainte smile.gif

Thanks for the happy birthday Rindy ... but my profile is correct it was two months ago smile.gif I was referring to the thread being started on
Posted on 24-May-2005, 05:08 AM smile.gif

and thank you for the compliment hug.gif

Posted by: zeryx 25-Jul-2006, 04:36 PM
QUOTE (stoirmeil @ 25-Jul-2006, 06:23 PM)
Deep fried haggis in batter? Spicy? At a chip shop? smile.gif I like the sound of this.
Got a recipe? How about putting it over in the recipes thread under Scottish recipes?

I'm not sure what the recipe is for this ... I can get the recipe from a Scottish prize winning butcher though for haggis itself lol

I'll find out some of the more sucessful things I've tried and put the recipes up for you smile.gif

Posted by: jesstuss 07-Apr-2007, 07:46 PM
tongue.gif Vegetarian Haggis in a can. tongue.gif

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 08-Apr-2007, 07:19 AM
QUOTE (Macfive @ 23-May-2005, 11:08 PM)
Ok, let's see who has tried everyone's favorite Scottish dish. Or if you have not tried it, do you plan on having a little taste of the haggis? thumbsup.gif

biggrin.gif

The real question should be, Do You Like Haggis?

yucky.gif thumbdown.gif

Posted by: Donajhi 10-Jul-2007, 05:04 PM
Have I eaten haggis? Sure, but you will eat anything when you are 2. Do I
remember how it taste, no........... eat.gif

Posted by: Haggishead 28-Nov-2007, 12:43 PM
I like it on special occasions. And yes, it depends on who makes it.

I was out with a group of folks after our St. Andrew's Day service at church on Sunday and we all enjoyed haggis at our local celtic restaurant. Well, at least the guys enjoyed it.

Posted by: dougiepiper1 15-Feb-2008, 05:33 AM
king.gif
the mighty haggis,
food fit for a King, of course it all depends on
what part of the haggis you eat!!!

i find the breast is best rather that the leg's.

wi' a good whisky scauce. note.gif thumbs_up.gif beer_mug.gif

Posted by: Patch 22-Feb-2008, 08:56 PM
I have tried it and having grown up around the butcher business in the early 40's it was not bad.

Slàinte,    

Patch

Posted by: gwenlee 22-Feb-2008, 09:10 PM
I have ate haggis several times and I found the best way to eat it is to cut the haggis in small pieces, dip it in the mashed potatoes and swirl it in gravy. Then it is edible

Posted by: Patch 03-Apr-2008, 07:54 PM
Dad was a frugal man who wasted nothing. In our refrigerator we had Scrapple, Souse, Head Cheese, Blood Pudding, Liver Pudding, Pickled Tripe, Pigs Feet and Tails." We ate baked heart, Liver, Ox Tail Stew, Sweet Breads (Glands in a beef's neck) and brains along with the better cuts. Haggis was just a small step further. I had already eaten everything in it but lungs and kidneys. The flavor is bland to my taste. If reading the cooking instructions turns your stomach, you will never get a bite down. I found that a Lamb loin can be used in lieu of the lungs, kidneys and heart but it seems to need the chopped liver. You can even make it in a pan and bake it if the Paunch does not appeal to you. I have never experimented with seasonings but one could do that too. My Brother used to supply the sheep parts for me but thanks to the Govt. he sold the sheep or gave them away.

I guess first eating it as a child was the best way to start.

Since it is just me now, cooking has become a waste of time.

I hope someone gets an idea here and tries it.

Slàinte,    

Patch




Posted by: Jillian 02-Aug-2008, 11:39 AM
Yes...it was excellent!

Jillian biggrin.gif

Posted by: Lady Jeanetta 02-Aug-2008, 12:01 PM
I first had haggis in a cozy pub in Edinburgh. With the spices and all, I really liked it! Of course, I haven't been brave enough yet to try the canned variety...

Posted by: Harlot 02-Aug-2008, 11:10 PM
After reading everyones post ,I don't think I'd want to try. I'll just stay with my cube beef hearts.

Posted by: Dogshirt 03-Aug-2008, 12:39 AM
Yeah! y'all can eat haggis, but how about ........LUTEFISK? wink.gif


beer_mug.gif

Posted by: Patch 03-Aug-2008, 05:35 AM
QUOTE (Harlot @ 03-Aug-2008, 01:10 AM)
After reading everyones post ,I don't think I'd want to try. I'll just stay with my cube beef hearts.

Mom used to make the best baked beef heart in dressing ever!! I can not remember if she pre-cooked the heart before baking it with the stuffing.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Patch 03-Aug-2008, 06:17 AM
My grandmother often made boiled mutton/broth with neeps & tatties. Depending on what was in season other vegetables were added. It usuallu lasted two or three meals even with my cousin and I there. We ate it over dry (stale) home baked bread. I am making myself hungry.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Harlot 03-Aug-2008, 04:48 PM
QUOTE (Patch @ 03-Aug-2008, 07:35 AM)
Mom used to make the best baked beef heart in dressing ever!! I can not remember if she pre-cooked the heart before baking it with the stuffing.

Slàinte,    

Patch    


Patch,That sound so good.I'll try it that way next(with mashed potatoes,gravy,and my fav. green beans. Your mother must of been a good coke just like mine was.




Posted by: Lady of Avalon 03-Aug-2008, 05:43 PM
QUOTE (Dogshirt @ 03-Aug-2008, 02:39 AM)
Yeah! y'all can eat haggis, but how about ........LUTEFISK? wink.gif


beer_mug.gif

Isn't it a norvegian dish?

I wonder if they serve it in Iceland as well? If so, when going I'll try it.

LOA

Posted by: Camac 03-Aug-2008, 06:34 PM
I have only one thing to say about Haggis. "OH AYE"



Camac.

Posted by: Patch 03-Aug-2008, 07:27 PM
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 03-Aug-2008, 07:43 PM)
QUOTE (Dogshirt @ 03-Aug-2008, 02:39 AM)
Yeah! y'all can eat haggis, but how about ........LUTEFISK? wink.gif


beer_mug.gif

Isn't it a norvegian dish?

I wonder if they serve it in Iceland as well? If so, when going I'll try it.

LOA

I looked that up on the net and will pass!! The recommendation was that you drink till you can not taste the difference between LUTEFISK and a Kit Kat bar with catsup on it. Then you eat the LUTEFISK with a LOT of mustard!

Slàinte,   

 Patch    

Posted by: Patch 03-Aug-2008, 07:39 PM
QUOTE (Harlot @ 03-Aug-2008, 06:48 PM)
QUOTE (Patch @ 03-Aug-2008, 07:35 AM)
Mom used to make the best baked beef heart in dressing ever!!  I can not remember if she pre-cooked the heart before baking it with the stuffing.

Slàinte,    

Patch    


Patch,That sound so good.I'll try it that way next(with mashed potatoes,gravy,and my fav. green beans. Your mother must of been a good coke just like mine was.

Ah, that she was. She didn't use recipe's so only the things my sister wrote down exist. I used to get a recipe from her occasionally but I rarely cook any more.

My grandmother on dads side cooked for granddad and he liked the Scot food. I grew up with Scot, Irish and since dad was a butcher, some German cuisine.

As a kid when friends came to our house they were sometimes shocked by what was in the refrigerator. It contained jars of strange things at times.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Robert Phoenix 03-Aug-2008, 10:05 PM
I haven't tried it yet but its on my to do list. I remember Lutefisk was really the haggis of Minnesota when I was living there. I think a couple of DJs named Elmo And Pasty recorded a Lutefisk song that was quite popular in the twin Cities in the 80"s. I still have the 45 somewere.
Back to the haggis the canned version is the only kind I've seen and I have to travel two hours to get it so I can wait. Hey , I've already have had squid and octopus so what the heck!

Posted by: Camac 04-Aug-2008, 06:43 AM
Patch;

On my trip to Scotland last October I had some really great Haggis for dinner one night. My Cousins wife made it "Bluidy Great". Your lucky your mother was a good cook, mine wasn't. I fact we use to say "don't loose the can opener Mom or we'll starve to death".However she did make gooooood porridge. Had to use a jackhammer to get it out of the pot. The way I like it, thick with brown sugar and cream.





Camac.

Posted by: Patch 04-Aug-2008, 07:46 AM
I learned the hard way that when restaurants advertised "Moms Home Cooking" that all Moms were not equal in the cooking department.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Patch 04-Aug-2008, 07:59 AM
In Haggis the cooking container is the sheeps paunch. My grand mother made it as a casserole in a covered container many times too. (probably similar to canned Haggis) I believe she made it with pork parts also from time to time. She cooked on a wood burning cook stove until the last couple of years of her life. Sometimes I wish I could go back even if only for a day or two! Another of my favorites was Mutton "biled" with "neeps and tatties" and a couple of onions. I learned to love meat broth over old bread that way and still have that whenever possible.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Harlot 04-Aug-2008, 05:26 PM
Patch; My mom was but my Dad could make a mean cheese cake.One thing mom would make and she would call it POOR MAN'S POTATOE SOUP.Used hotdogs for the meat,and it's getting passed down my daughter called for the recipe.She can't cook very well unless it comes from a box or it's delived,but she's getting better.My grandkids are healthy. biggrin.gif

Posted by: Lady of Avalon 04-Aug-2008, 06:06 PM
One word for this dish: revolting

While in Scotland, we ate in a restaurant and hubby said:"Well tonight is the night." I understood what he meant when he ordered. I'm usually quite opened to sample different dishes from different cultures but I don't know if it was the fact that I was tired, anyways I didn't feel like tasting or trying the famous scottish "haggis" that night.

When his plate arrived in front of him I almost puked on the table.God!was that ever ugly what was in the plate.I surely didn't feel well I'm sure. Next time we visit I must try it. yucky.gif

LOA

Posted by: Camac 04-Aug-2008, 07:39 PM
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 04-Aug-2008, 07:06 PM)
One word for this dish: revolting


When his plate arrived in front of him I almost puked on the table.God!was that ever ugly what was in the plate.I surely didn't feel well I'm sure. Next time we visit I must try it. yucky.gif

LOA

LOA;

Ach Lass hold your wheese its nae for looking at its for eatin.


Camac. laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif

Posted by: Lady of Avalon 05-Aug-2008, 05:06 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 04-Aug-2008, 09:39 PM)
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 04-Aug-2008, 07:06 PM)
One word for this dish: revolting


When his plate arrived in front of him I almost puked on the table.God!was that ever ugly what was in the plate.I surely didn't feel well I'm sure. Next time we visit I must try it. yucky.gif

LOA

LOA;

Ach Lass hold your wheese its nae for looking at its for eatin.


Camac. laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif



Okay I'll try not to look next time humph!!! whistling.gif

LOA

Posted by: Patch 05-Aug-2008, 06:02 PM
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 05-Aug-2008, 07:06 PM)
QUOTE (Camac @ 04-Aug-2008, 09:39 PM)
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 04-Aug-2008, 07:06 PM)
One word for this dish: revolting


When his plate arrived in front of him I almost puked on the table.God!was that ever ugly what was in the plate.I surely didn't feel well I'm sure. Next time we visit I must try it. yucky.gif

LOA

LOA;

Ach Lass hold your wheese its nae for looking at its for eatin.


Camac. laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif



Okay I'll try not to look next time humph!!! whistling.gif

LOA

A tied off sheeps paunch is not a pleasant thing to behold, but it is actually meat. That being the traditional presentation, a casserole Haggis would eliminate the problem with appearance. Not all Haggis is made with the same ingredients either. There are a lot of Haggis options.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Lady of Avalon 05-Aug-2008, 07:04 PM
QUOTE (Patch @ 05-Aug-2008, 08:02 PM)
A tied off sheeps paunch is not a pleasant thing to behold, but it is actually meat. That being the traditional presentation, a casserole Haggis would eliminate the problem with appearance. Not all Haggis is made with the same ingredients either. There are a lot of Haggis options.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

I'll try to keep that in mind next time!!! hypocrite.gif

Posted by: TMcAdams 05-Aug-2008, 07:16 PM
wink.gif I'd like to try it, but I don't know scared.gif

Posted by: Patch 05-Aug-2008, 08:50 PM
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 05-Aug-2008, 09:04 PM)
QUOTE (Patch @ 05-Aug-2008, 08:02 PM)
A tied off sheeps paunch is not a pleasant thing to behold, but it is actually meat.  That being the traditional presentation, a casserole Haggis would eliminate the problem with appearance.  Not all Haggis is made with the same ingredients either.  There are a lot of Haggis options.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

I'll try to keep that in mind next time!!! hypocrite.gif

If you order it in Scotland, you will probably get the traditional presentation. You can ask for just a portion to be served without the paunch.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Patch 05-Aug-2008, 08:53 PM
QUOTE (TMcAdams @ 05-Aug-2008, 09:16 PM)
wink.gif I'd like to try it, but I don't know scared.gif

If you are interested in trying Haggis, never read a traditional Haggis recipe. It tends to assail ones senses.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Camac 07-Aug-2008, 08:53 AM
QUOTE (Patch @ 05-Aug-2008, 09:50 PM)
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 05-Aug-2008, 09:04 PM)
QUOTE (Patch @ 05-Aug-2008, 08:02 PM)
A tied off sheeps paunch is not a pleasant thing to behold, but it is actually meat.  That being the traditional presentation, a casserole Haggis would eliminate the problem with appearance.  Not all Haggis is made with the same ingredients either.  There are a lot of Haggis options.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

I'll try to keep that in mind next time!!! hypocrite.gif

If you order it in Scotland, you will probably get the traditional presentation. You can ask for just a portion to be served without the paunch.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Patch;

The second time I had Haggis in Scotland last year it was in a restaurant and when served it looked like Meat Loaf. My cousin told me that it is served like that to Tourist unless thay ask for Traditional. Not all restaurants do this just this one because they get a lot of Americans eating there. It was Gooooood.


Camac

Posted by: Patch 07-Aug-2008, 09:53 AM
QUOTE (Camac @ 07-Aug-2008, 10:53 AM)
QUOTE (Patch @ 05-Aug-2008, 09:50 PM)
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 05-Aug-2008, 09:04 PM)
QUOTE (Patch @ 05-Aug-2008, 08:02 PM)
A tied off sheeps paunch is not a pleasant thing to behold, but it is actually meat.  That being the traditional presentation, a casserole Haggis would eliminate the problem with appearance.  Not all Haggis is made with the same ingredients either.  There are a lot of Haggis options.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

I'll try to keep that in mind next time!!! hypocrite.gif

If you order it in Scotland, you will probably get the traditional presentation. You can ask for just a portion to be served without the paunch.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Patch;

The second time I had Haggis in Scotland last year it was in a restaurant and when served it looked like Meat Loaf. My cousin told me that it is served like that to Tourist unless thay ask for Traditional. Not all restaurants do this just this one because they get a lot of Americans eating there. It was Gooooood.


Camac

Of course you butcher one sheep and you get one paunch thus one traditional Haggis. That is what probably makes it so special. After the Haggis, there is a lot of mutton to eat before you butcher the next one and I have heard that the Scot's could make a small piece of mutton last all week. I would not put Haggis above a really good steak!! Of course if in Scotland sharp knives are banned, with a haggis, you could untie one end and squeeze the contents out as it it were a cake decorator. Just kidding!

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Camac 07-Aug-2008, 11:32 AM
Patch;

It's amazing the uses of a sheeps' stomache, Haggis, Water Bag, Flotation Device, and of course BagPipes. We Scots are inventive EH!.



Camac. rolleyes.gif thumbs_up.gif

Posted by: Lady of Avalon 07-Aug-2008, 11:52 AM
Guys, I have a fragile stomach today, we ate bad corn yesterday hubby and I were both sick... reading your posts on Scottish delicacies taste is too much for me today puke.gif ...sorry no offense.

LOA

Posted by: Patch 07-Aug-2008, 12:19 PM
Sorry about the corn. I love it in season. Sure makes one wonder where all the food borne ailments are coming from! There was talk in govt about forcing all distributors of food to have listed the country of origin ON the product. I gave up most seafood for that reason.


Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Patch 07-Aug-2008, 12:37 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 07-Aug-2008, 01:32 PM)
Patch;

It's amazing the uses of a sheeps' stomache, Haggis, Water Bag, Flotation Device, and of course BagPipes. We Scots are inventive EH!.



Camac. rolleyes.gif thumbsup.gif

Yes, I heard the story of the bagpipes. For any who have not, A Scot was walking his pasture, eyes on the distant hills looking for his sheep when he accidentally stepped on a bloated sheeps carcass. The sound was somewhat pleasing, the Scotsman thought about for a while and thus the Bagpipes were born!

That conjures up some really evil images as to how we reached the point where we are at today with the Bagpipes.

When I sent my Bagpipes to be restored there was nothing left of the bag and just a few very small pieces of wool tartan from the cover. For pipes that were a gift they turned out to be pricy in restoration.

Slàinte,   

 Patch    

Posted by: Leelee 07-Aug-2008, 12:43 PM
Yes, I have tried Haggis (again) at the 19th Annual Highland Gathering in July. Not bad; can say it is an acquired taste. Will I eat it again? Sure, just try not to think what the ingredients are and ye should be fine thumbs_up.gif

Me ma either made Haggis or she purchased it from the Butcher; that was the only other time I ate Haggis. I was quite young at the time so, I can't tell you whether I loved it or hated it back in the day biggrin.gif

Posted by: Camac 07-Aug-2008, 01:47 PM
LEELEE;

They didn't have canned Haggis when I was young but if they did my Mom would have served it and I wouldn't had to wait till my 20s to eat it.




Camac.

Posted by: Lady of Avalon 07-Aug-2008, 06:18 PM
My stomach is back to a ''semblant'' of normal tonight.
So go on with your stories on the delicacies of haggis... fear.gif I'll keep on reading and harden myself for the next ''descriptive'' post.

LOA

Posted by: Patch 07-Aug-2008, 08:22 PM
I think a lot of food likes and dislikes are born in ones youth. If you try something as a child and it isn't repulsive, you will like it as an adult. My son turned my daughter against beets with tales of blood and etc. I didn't know it till she was in her late 20's. The Indian Sun Dance is a prime example. If you are fortunate enough to be invited, you can "dine" with the various tribes. Some of the food was repulsive to me and some was not bad. They each thought their own food was great. It's all in what you are used to.

Slàinte,   

 Patch    

Posted by: Leelee 14-Aug-2008, 10:26 AM
QUOTE
They didn't have canned Haggis when I was young but if they did my Mom would have served it and I wouldn't had to wait till my 20s to eat it.


They have canned Haggis now unsure.gif No thank you.....original preparation or nothing at all....that's the only way to go wink.gif

Posted by: Patch 14-Aug-2008, 10:48 AM
QUOTE (Leelee @ 14-Aug-2008, 12:26 PM)

They have canned Haggis now unsure.gif No thank you.....original preparation or nothing at all....that's the only way to go wink.gif

Canned Haggis would be similar to canned dog food with maybe a little less texture. That is NOT a thought to dwell on! I had an uncle who found canned dog food in an other container in the refrigerator and made a sandwich with it. He thought it was sandwich spread and complimented my Aunt for making it. The state here had a contract with a dog food manufacturer to take road kill animals to be made into pet food. Some of them were pretty "tender" if you get the drift.

Slàinte,       

Patch    

Posted by: Leelee 14-Aug-2008, 04:00 PM
QUOTE
Canned Haggis would be similar to canned dog food with maybe a little less texture.



Okay, um......that's just UCK!!!!! puke.gif oops....sorry unsure.gif

Posted by: JKING62370 14-Aug-2008, 04:45 PM
I REASLLY LIKE THE OUTLANDER QUOTES. LET'S HAVE MORE wink.gif

Posted by: Patch 14-Aug-2008, 05:13 PM
QUOTE (Leelee @ 14-Aug-2008, 06:00 PM)


Okay, um......that's just UCK!!!!! puke.gif oops....sorry unsure.gif

I apologize. I was just thinking of Haggis, placed in a can and cooked to destroy bacteria. I wasn't really clear, the dog food would have less texture than the canned Haggis.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Leelee 14-Aug-2008, 05:29 PM
QUOTE
I REASLLY LIKE THE OUTLANDER QUOTES. LET'S HAVE MORE 


Okay JKING62370, we'll work on that smile.gif An "Outlander" fan, are ye?


QUOTE
Okay, um......that's just UCK!!!!!  oops....sorry 


I apologize. I was just thinking of Haggis, placed in a can and cooked to destroy bacteria. I wasn't really clear, the dog food would have less texture than the canned Haggis.


Okay, Patch I got'cha wink.gif

Posted by: Leelee 15-Aug-2008, 04:56 PM
Hi JKING62370, welcome to Celtic Radio biggrin.gif Glad ye found this awesome Community thumbs_up.gif Lots of great music, forums and of course, meeting the wonderful members of this Community smile.gif Enjoy!!! I will be looking forward to reading your posts thumbs_up.gif cheers.gif

Posted by: sisterknight 28-Oct-2008, 09:23 AM
aaahhh come on people it's not THAT bad if done right!!!!! biggrin.gif

Posted by: Patch 28-Oct-2008, 07:37 PM
I have never tasted "canned Haggis that I recall though my memory dims with age. Most modern haggis does not use the "offal" with the exception of the "paunch". Haggis for the purist is best not discussed at the table for most of those new to the experience. The Scots were a frugal bunch and wasted nothing. My Grandfather had a comment about the only part of the beast the Scots didn't eat. It wasn't what you might be thinking. The ceremony of having "The Haggis" piped into the dining room is a ceremony in the finest tradition of Robert Burns.

Slàinte,    

Patch    

Posted by: Patch 21-Nov-2008, 06:02 PM
Below is a very OLD recipe for Haggis. "Lights" are lungs and pinhead oatmeal I believe is steel cut oatmeal.

Haggis

Stomach bag and pluck

(heart, liver and lights of a sheep you can substitute a selection of organ meats)

2 onions, peeled

2 c pinhead oatmeal

1 2/3 c suet

salt &pepper

trussing needle and fine string

Thoroughly wash the stomach bag in cold water. Turn it inside out and scald it, then scrape the surface with a knife. Soak it in cold salted water overnight. Next day remove the bag from the water and leave it on one side while preparing the filling. Wash the pluck. Put it into a pan, with the windpipe hanging over the side into a bowl, to let out any impurities. Cover the pluck with cold water, add 1 teaspoon of salt and bring the water to a boil. Skim the surface, then simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Meanwhile parboil the onions, drain, reserving the liquid, and chop them roughly. Also toast the pinhead oatmeal until golden brown. Drain the pluck when ready and cut away the windpipe and any excess gristle. Mince half the liver with all the heart and lights, then stir in the shredded suet, the toasted oatmeal and the onions. Season well with salt and pepper. Moisten with as much of the onion or pluck water as necessary to make the mixture soft. With the rough surface of the bag outside fill it just over half full, the oatmeal will swell during cooking, and sew the ends together with the trussing needle and fine string. Prick the bag in places with the needle. Place the haggis on and enamel plate and put it into a pan of boiling water. Cover the pan and cook for about 3 hours, adding more boiling water when necessary to keep the haggis covered.

I have a modern recipe which calls for baking after boiling the Haggis.

Enjoy!

Slàinte,    

Patch

Posted by: drummie 21-Nov-2008, 08:56 PM
It almost never fails that at any highland games i go to, that the post get together always involves Haggis. I have had it on Ritz, saltines, toast, strait up and in shepherds pie, not too bad. Mind you, that I also had about 4 or 5 drams of Belvine Scotch in me.

Posted by: Patch 22-Nov-2008, 12:36 PM
I didn't know what it was till I grew older (teens or 20's) as it was mostly made in a pan by my grandmother. Once in a while she made a true Haggis. You could only get one paunch per sheep and only butcher so many sheep. However all critters had the same innards (different sized paunches though) so Haggis in a baking pan was born. I think my grandfather would have eaten the horns and hooves if they could have been prepared for consumption. Oh, yes, he ate pigs feet minus the hard covering. As a youngster, I was a small human garbage disposal.

Slàinte,   

 Patch    

Posted by: ArwenLegolas 23-Dec-2008, 05:05 PM
At a Robby Burns Event Last Year with the Celtic Chorus of Houston, and all the trimmings. Plan on going there this year in my Scottish duds.

Posted by: lschillinger 29-Dec-2008, 04:35 PM
Haggis isn't bad at all! It tastes a lot better than it sounds. As long as you don't let your mental inhabitions get in the way!

Unfortunately, you can't get REAL haggis in the US (legally anyway) It is actually against the law to sell sheep lung!

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