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> Raising Hot Peppers, Hot pepper gardening
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Montie, druid at heart 
Posted: 09-Oct-2008, 03:43 PM
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Hello fellow gardners. I don't raise as big of a garden as I used to but still like to piddle. I raised some"Biker Billy Jalapenos" this year and they actually turned out pretty well. I like jalapenos but wished they were a little hotter. I found these seeds in Burpee and tried them this year. Once they turn red, you have a pretty hot pepper with good flavor, not like a habanera. I also raised some popcorn again and used alot of non-hybrid seeds. I've raised other hot peppers before and you can make some heat but you don't get alot of flavor.
Anyone else have any other suggestions for hot peppers with flavor that I can raise?
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stoirmeil 
Posted: 09-Oct-2008, 04:42 PM
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If it's heat and flavor you want, you have to get the right seeds for the right variety. I have had tremendous enjoyment (I mean, I fell in love with the plants themselves) growing chilis that make a pepper about an inch and a half to two inches long, narrow and pointed. A tien-tsin chili is what they were, bright red, about 75,000 scoville units (not too hot, but they varied. A few plants gave me peppers with the reddish coloring to the membrane inside, instead of white, and this means more heat. And they were pretty hot when still green, and had a nice greeny flavor). Ornamental, small plants (about 10" high) and the pepers had a delicate flavor with a little sweetness behind the heat, and lots of peppers in multiple crops. These were a good deal hotter than a jalapeno, but nothing like an habanera, which may not do too well without a really hot climate. I started the peppers in mid-spring, in a waxing moon in Cancer (farmer's almanac, and it worked) and kept them inside in sunny windows until almost June, then put them out on the fire escape through the summer. Well into the fall they were still trying to keep making more crops. They were excellent in salsas, gave a slow developing warm burn, not extreme.

You want to consider your other spices in a dish too. The peppers may have flavor of their own, but unlss they are smoked or something, a lot of the flavor is going to come from other spices.

Check out the chilis at Penzey's spice company -- they make a tremendous powdered chipotle that I keep on the table in a shaker. Even a peanut buttered rice cake is a taste privilege with some of this stuff on it.

http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-p...yschipotle.html
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TheCarolinaScotsman 
Posted: 09-Oct-2008, 11:23 PM
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It must be so heart warming to eat your own produce. rolleyes.gif


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Montie, druid at heart 
Posted: 10-Oct-2008, 06:24 AM
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Thanks for the ideas. I'll go to the web site and then do a search for the tien-tsin chili to find a source. I like the idea of a hot pepper shaker and have friends who grind up their peppers they raised to put in the shaker. I've thought about trying to raise a pepper plant in a pot that would last longer so I could have fresh peppers almost year round.
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Montie, druid at heart 
Posted: 10-Oct-2008, 06:30 AM
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I've also raised the Thai Dragon Hybrid from Burpee and that plant produced a lot of peppers and they had alot of heat. I dried those and have used those for a few years during the winter.
Where did you get the tien-tsin chili plants?
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stoirmeil 
Posted: 10-Oct-2008, 10:57 AM
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QUOTE (Montie @ druid at heart,10-Oct-2008, 06:24 AM)
I've thought about trying to raise a pepper plant in a pot that would last longer so I could have fresh peppers almost year round.

Well -- most chilis are annuals, not perennials, so they do know when it's time to die. I'm not lying when I tell you I had a favorite plant, and when she finally gave it up I cried. But if you had a "hothouse" (a well-humidified, slightly ventilated, upturned large aquarium on a table in the sun), or an especially warm and sunny window with no drafts, and the help of a grow-light when the days get short, I suppose you could try to force-germinate them out of season (plant in early September, say) and see how they do. Hard to fool Mother Nature, since in the temperate latitudes the amount of light in a day is short, and plants know that. But maybe if you treat them well and make sure they get warmth, plenty of water and enough light, they'll perform for you. They loved ordinary potting soil, which is probably richer than most outdoor garden soils. I lined the pot bottoms with pebbles and broken shell for drainage, because peppers do rot if they get to sitting in water, and you need to water them a lot. Don't use too big a pot, so they'll put their energy into top growth and fruit, rather than roots.

I got the tien-tsin peppers from a Chinese grocery. I just bought hot peppers to cook with and saved the seeds. Very high-tech. smile.gif Sounds like your Thai Dragon seeds were good, and probably related. All those long, thin, bright red jobs they use for asian cooking are similar.
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Montie, druid at heart 
Posted: 13-Oct-2008, 06:43 AM
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Thanks for the ideas. I guess I figured most seeds anymore are hybrid so I've not thought about saving the seeds. I will get some seeds and plant them.
Thanks again!
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Montie, druid at heart 
  Posted: 23-Oct-2008, 06:21 AM
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I dehydrated some of my "Biker Billy Jalapenos" and then chopped them up so I could make a pepper shaker. When I took the lid off to get a whiff, I got a nose full of hot pepper dust and about choked smile.gif. My wife as in the kitchen and must have smelled it and started fussing at me. (She doesn't like hot peppers) After my nose stopped running, I put it in a shaker that was empty and am now ready to go with "my pepper" shaker. So don't try to smell yours when you make it or you may get a nose full like I did.
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stoirmeil 
Posted: 23-Oct-2008, 02:36 PM
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QUOTE (Montie, druid at heart @ 23-Oct-2008, 06:21 AM)
So don't try to smell yours when you make it or you may get a nose full like I did.

lol.gif lol.gif lol.gif

You won't get a cold for the next year or two, anyway!

I love to keep chipotle powder in a shaker. That stuff is good on everything from fresh salad to peanut butter on rice cakes.
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