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Celtic Radio Community > The Celts > Celtic Archeology


Posted by: Antwn 17-Aug-2009, 06:11 PM
A Pictish king's gravesite was discovered in Scotland along with about a half dozen of his personal effects. The grave was 4,000 years old and found near a site archeologists know was a primary Pictish settlement since the 9th century and probably much earlier. Since not much is known about the Picts, this is an important find.

I wanted to start a new thread for anyone interested in Celtic archeological finds, a place where maybe people could post infomation they find online or from magazines. The story I summarized appeared in a Welsh online magazine and is not very long. I'll post the link just in case there's anyone who reads Welsh.

http://www.golwg360.com/ui/News/ViewNewsDetails.aspx?ID=4928&navigationID=95804&domainID=20

If anyone has any information or knows any links concerning archological finds related to the Celts or related peoples, here's a place to post them!

Posted by: flora 17-Aug-2009, 06:39 PM
You can't just dangle a juicy thread like that with so little information!!!!! tongue.gif I can't read ..... (sorry, commercial flashback).. Welsh. Who found it? Noble? Where in Scotland? Perth? Are they still working the site? Do they expect to find more?

Flora

Posted by: Antwn 17-Aug-2009, 07:28 PM
My apologies Flora, the article itself doesn't state much. It says the grave of a Pictish king approximately 4,000 yrs old was found near Perth in Fortiveot, the "capital city" in the 9th century but findings suggest it could be the home of kings far earlier than that. In the grave were personal items including a knife of bronze and gold, leather bag and dish. Dr. Noble was quoted by the newspaper the Independent. I assume he found it or headed the archological team. The quote at the end says:
"Regarding preservation, location and size, there's no grave to compare with it in Britain" said Dr. Gordon Noble.

Maybe on other sites like the BBC there might be more info. I'll look around when I get some time. Glad you're excited!

Posted by: Antwn 17-Aug-2009, 07:37 PM
Here you go Flora - one in English. Sorry about that. I first came across it while reading a Welsh on line magazine.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/tayside_and_central/8195357.stm

Posted by: flora 17-Aug-2009, 09:00 PM
Thank you!!! I really enjoyed the article. The fact that they maneuvered a slab of over 8000 pounds just for the king's grave boggles the mind. I hope they find more sites in the area.

Flora

Posted by: mcnberry 18-Aug-2009, 02:17 AM
Thanks for posting this Antwn!

I love history and archeology. Hope more people are posting here.

Here is the link to a site I visit quite often:

http://www.archaeology.co.uk/index.php


berry

Posted by: Antwn 18-Aug-2009, 04:22 PM
Nice site, thanks! Here's an American Archeology Magazine that I used to subscribe to .

http://www.archaeology.org/

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 18-Aug-2009, 06:29 PM
Thanks for the links. Here's one regarding http://celticmythpodshow.com/blog/2009/04/08/5000-year-old-roundhouse-discovered-in-scotland/.

Posted by: TheCarolinaScotsman 18-Aug-2009, 11:02 PM
Here's another link. http://www.archaeologica.org/NewsPage.htm I check it every day. Under the 8-17-09 entries is one describing research on going at Scone.

Posted by: Robert Phoenix 23-Aug-2009, 04:43 PM
Here's a bit of a find. A 3,000 year old barrel of butter!! Get out the waffles!
http://www.irishcentral.com/news/3000-year-old-butter-discovered-in-Ireland-54310297.html

Posted by: Antwn 23-Aug-2009, 05:06 PM
QUOTE (Robert Phoenix @ 23-Aug-2009, 05:43 PM)
Here's a bit of a find. A 3,000 year old barrel of butter!! Get out the waffles!
http://www.irishcentral.com/news/3000-year-old-butter-discovered-in-Ireland-54310297.html

Pretty amazing Robert! Thanks. Makes you wonder what else is buried in the bogs. Maybe a 3,000 year old IHOP.

Posted by: Robert Phoenix 23-Aug-2009, 05:16 PM
I'm waiting for them to find a twinkie-still in the wrapper!

Posted by: flora 24-Aug-2009, 08:13 PM
That was a great article on the butter. But I'm having a hard time placing a barrel from the iron age. Maybe what I'm thinking as a barrel (oak trimmed with iron bands) is wrong. Could someone enlighten me?

Flora

Posted by: Antwn 25-Aug-2009, 05:24 PM
QUOTE (flora @ 24-Aug-2009, 09:13 PM)
That was a great article on the butter. But I'm having a hard time placing a barrel from the iron age. Maybe what I'm thinking as a barrel (oak trimmed with iron bands) is wrong. Could someone enlighten me?

Flora

I'm no expert flora, but I did find another short article about this find that mentions an oak barrel which they're also calling a trunk (don't ask me) - so definitely wooden - and with a lid.

http://www.bagofnothing.com/2009/08/workers-find-3000-year-old-barrel-of-butter-in-irish-peat-bog/

Posted by: Antwn 25-Aug-2009, 05:26 PM
More stuff on Iron Age barrels

http://www.wines.com/wine_encyclopedia/barrels_more_info.html

Posted by: flora 26-Aug-2009, 07:23 AM
QUOTE
More stuff on Iron Age barrels


Mmmmm, now I want a glass of wine. biggrin.gif Thanks Antwn. Since barrel-making was just starting to develop around that time, I was wondering how a craftman with that knowledge would be so far away from the epicenter. I forgot we are talking about a timeline that gives or takes a 100 years or so. Very interesting.

Flora

Posted by: mcnberry 30-Aug-2009, 09:03 PM
9,000 year old Neolithic fishing trap found in Hill of Tara landscape during excavations along path of M3 motorway


http://www.indymedia.ie/article/93838





Posted by: MelissaDawn7 27-May-2014, 10:34 AM
Thanks for the read. I love anything to do with archaeology smile.gif

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