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Celtic Radio Community > Gathering of the Clans > Clan Affiliations


Posted by: CelticRose 14-Dec-2003, 09:42 PM
Tell us about your clan affiliation and what you have learned about them. If you are looking for what clan you might be affiliated with, this a good website to start out with.

http://www.tartans.com/


Posted by: CelticRose 14-Dec-2003, 10:03 PM
Through my research, I have discovered that my Scottish ancestry come from the Macpherson clan. The most hilarious thing is so is my husband's family! hug.gif

Any of you from the MacPherson Clan?

Here is a couple of sites that you might be interested in as well as a little history of our clan.

http://www.his.com/~rory/colliergen.html

http://www.clan-macpherson.org/

Glimpses Appendix 9
GENEALOGY OF THE MACPHERSONS.


From Jeremy Collier's'Great Historical, Geographical, Genealogical, and Poetical Dictionary, London, 1701. Reprinted on pp 436-438 of Alexander Macpherson's Glimpses
What follows is taken from the Appendix of Glimpses. In that form it consists of one long paragraph; which I have broken it up into a series of smaller ones. The information it contains is to a large degree fantasy / myth as will be shown by Prof. Alan G. Macpherson¼s appraisal that follows will point out. Nevertheless it was highly esteemed by the Macphersons of its day as well as in recent times and does contains some insights that are valuable to students who seek to better understand the history of the Clam Macpherson. A similar article by Peter Fish appeared in The Urlar #39, Spring 1986 under the title 'THE ORIGIN OF THE CLAN -- Sir Aeneas Macpherson of Invereshie's Version. It is from this article that AGM's critique is derived -- Rory Mor

MCPHERSON.-The name of a Scotch Highland Clan commonly called the Clan Chattan, fam'd for antiquity and valour. They draw their original from the Chatti, or Catti, the antient inhabitants of Hessia and Thuringia, in Germany, whence they were expelled by the Hermondures, with the assistance of the Romans, in the reign of the Emperor Tiberius. Cattorum Castellum, one of the Landtgrave of Hesse's Palaces, and Cattorurn Melibceci or Catzenellebogen, which is one of the family's Titles, do still preserve the memory of the antient Catti, who being forced to leave their Country, came lower down upon the Rhine into Battavia, now Holland, where Catwick, &c., still bears their name; thence a colony of them came for Scotland, and landing in the North of that Kingdom were kindly received by the King of Scots, who gave them that part of the Country, where they landed, which from them was called Caithnesse - ie., the Catti's Corner.

Being settled here, they did many eminent services against the Picts, and other enemies of the Scots, till the time of king Alphinus, when the Chief of the Catti, called Gilly Catton Moir - ie., the great for his extraordinary conduct and valour, being married to a sister of Brudus, King of the Picts, he was in a streight how to behave himself betwixt both Kings, who in a little time after fell out, and as the best expedient resolves upon a Neutrality. In the reign of Kennethus II, who also had war with the Picts, this Gilly Catton Moir, amongst others of the Scotch nobility, was summoned to attend the King's Standard: he excused himself by reason of his age; but to evidence his loyalty, though allied to the Picts, he sent one of his sons, with half of his clan, to join the Scots, which did not a little contribute to that fatal blow that issued in the utter ruin of the Picts.

Most of the Clan Chattan, with their valiant leader, falling in the battle, the old man died for grief, and the remaining part were, by the advice of their enemies, prosecuted as favourers of the Picts, expelled Caithness, and, with much ado, obtained leave to settle in Lochaber, where they remain to this day; and the son of the Captain of the clan, who fell in the battle against the Picts, was in consideration of his father's merit created Knight Marshal, from whom the illustrious family of Keith, now great Earl Marshal of Scotland, are said to be descended.

The chief of those who settled in Lochaber was, in a little time after, made Hereditary steward of that Country, and the family, for some ages, had a standing Commission from the crown to suppress rebellions, by virtue of which, they ruined the family of the Cummins, one of the greatest in the Kingdom, but engaged in an incurable rebellion in the time of Bruce.

Muirach MIGilly Chattan, called Albanach abroad, where he travelled, because of his Country, was second son to Dermond M'Gillychattan, Chief of the Clan, and for his extraordinary piety had a church preferment, and was made Prior of Kinguishy. Celibacy having not then obtained amongst the Scotch Clergy, he married the Thane of Calder's daughter, by whom he had Dugal Ovir, or the swarthy, his eldest son, afterwards Captain of the clan ; Evan Bane, or the fair, from whom comes Clunie M'Pherson; Niel Cromb, or the stooping Smith, so called from his round shoulders and the curious works which he made in Iron and Brass, from whom comes the family of Breakoe-Smith and others. Farchard Gillybrae, so called from his swiftness and expedition, of whom are the family of M'Gillybrayes of Dunmaglash on the river of Nairn, and David Dow, or the black, from whom are descended the Davidsons of Invernahavine. These, and some others, were all Muirach's sons, and besides their petty nicknames from complexions or temper, and the Patronymicks derived by their posterity, from their several sects, they were always called Clan Wirich in memory of their father, and clan Pherson or M'Pherson from his Office.

This Muirach's eldest brother dying, he succeeded as chief of the clan, and having settled his affairs, left his eldest son, Dugal Ovir above-named, in possession of the Estate, and went in Pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and arriving there on the third of May, he kept that day ever after, and bound his family in a curse to do the like, which they observe to this day. In his return he took Rome, Spain, and Ireland in his way, and happening to come thither, when there was a contest for the crown of Leinster, and being in great reputation for his quality and piety, he was applied to, for reconciling the differing factions, in which he behaved himself with such extraordinary Conduct, that though neither of them would yield to one another, they unanimously chose him a little after, being, by this time a widower and well stricken in years, he married the daughter of O'Neal, one of the Competitors, and gained so much love from the people, that they made the Succession Hereditary to his family. He died in the 23rd of his reign, and was buried in the Cathedral of Dublin. His son Evar M'Muirach succeeded, governed well, and died in the 49th of his reign. His son Dermond M'Wirich succeeded, who for his Tyranny, and particularly ravishing the wife of Maurice O'rock,1 King of Meath, was expelled his Kingdom, and restored again by HenryII., king of England, who laid claim to the crown of Ireland afterward; so that Muirach's progeny were outed of the soveraignty, but the family of the McMuirachs, still remaining in Ireland, derive their pedigree from him.

Dugal Ovir above-mentioned, who was left Chief of the Clan in Scotland, had only one son, and he an only daughter, who marrying a stranger called M'Kintosh --ie., the Thane's son, being son or grandson to the Thane of Fife,-- the estate was transferred into another family, whence the Laird of M'Kintosh is lineally descended, and that family pretended to be chief of the clan Chattan as marrying the Heiress; but the M'Donalds, who were superiour to all the Clans, determined it often in favour of the Laird of Cluny's predecessors, and it was finally determined on his side, by the Council of Scotland, in the reign of Charles II., who declared the M'Kintoshes and M'Phersons different families, because M'Kintosh did not take the name and bearing of the Heiress's family.

Evan Bane, before-mentioned, had for his Lady a daughter of M'Leans, by whom he had Kenneth, the eldest Cluny's predecessor - and Gilly's, II., of whom the family of Inveressie, and one John, by another woman, of whom the family of Pitmean. This family has had many fewds with neighbouring clans, but more especially with the Clan Cameron's, having in one battle killed their chief, the Laird of Lochzell, with about 600 of his clan, and taking the rest, brought them to Cluny's house, where some were for cutting them off, but he generously set them at liberty, saying that his family would grow effeminate if they wanted an enemy to exercise their valour.

It was also the M'Phersons who fought that bloody combat of thirty on a side in the Inch of Perth, in presence of the King, and came off with the Victory; and it was that clan who held out the Castle of Ruthven for the Earl of Huntly against the Earl of Argile in Queen Mary's time. This family appeared in the field for King Charles I., with 600 Men, under the Marquis of Montrose, and Win. M'Pherson, Laird of Inveressie, was killed under their command at the Battle of Old Earn [Auldearn]. They also declared for King James, under the Viscount of Dundee, and six-and-twenty of them were killed at Crombdale by Sir Thomas Levingston, Commander of King William and Queen Mary's Forces -- but since that time they have submitted to the Government, and their chief hath been ordered to raise men for its service.

This clan can bring a regiment of well-armed men to the Field. In time of peace they are said to be as courteous and industrious as the lowlanders, and in time of war, can endure the fatigue of the rudest Highlanders.

Their ancient bearing was a ship, in memory of their voyage by sea; and the cross Croslet, in memory of the above-mentioned pilgrimage, and the bloody hand, in remembrance of Exterminating the Cummins. Their Chief's coat is now party par pale or and azure, in the Dexter Canton, a hand holding a dagger Saltirewise, and in the sinister a cross croslet, fitche Gules, and the supporters are two Highlanders with their slit doublets, naked from the Girdle downwards, with their shirts tied betwixt their thighs, their swords, Durks and Helmets proper, and for his crest a cat Rampant proper, with this motto, "Touch not the Cat but a Glove."

Collier adds: " This narrative was collected by a person of quality of the family, and one of its principal branches."
_________
1 [O'Rourke?]


Prof. Alan G. Macpherson's Commentary of Collier's publication.

"The document is a well-known one. It was first published in 1701 as an article under the title of 'McPherson' in Jeremy Collier's Great Historical, Geographical, Genealogical, and Political Dictionary. This was an early attempt at a one-volume encyclopedia rather than what we now understand as a dictionary. It was republished in 1893 by Alexander Macpherson, Provost of Kingussie and Factor of the Cluny estate, in his book Glimpses of Church and Social Life in the Highlands in Olden Times and Other Papers.

"What is interesting about your copy in manuscript is that Badenoch Macphersons emigrating to the New World in the 1770s knew of this paper and copied it. I suspect that the copy was made from the printed Version of 1701 rather than from the original manuscript. Your copy, apart from minor differences in the spelling of names, is identical with the 1701 version. But yours omits the technical and official description of the chief's coat of arms just before the reference to the motto (last sentence). The 1701 version includes an editorial note by Collier: 'This narrative was collected by a person of quality of the family and one of its principal branches.'

"It has always been assumed that this person of quality was Sir Aeneas Macpherson of Invereshie, author of The Loyall Dissuasive. There is a section devoted to him in my Posterity of the Three Brethren. On the other hand, the 1701 version does not include the note about the authors at the end of your copy, and this is very interesting to me because these are precisely the authorities used by Sir Aeneas in The Loyall Dissuasive. 2 It makes it pretty certain that he was the author of the article.¾


SUMMARY OF AGM'S COMMENTS ON THE LOYALLL DISSUASIVE

From The Posterity of the Three Brethren
"Highland historians have generally discounted the connections with the Chatti, with Caithness, and with the King of Leinster. Vatican records fail to reveal the papal dispensation, while the pilgrimage to Jerusalem is based upon a mistaken identification of Muriach Cattanach with Muireach Albanach, the famous O'Daly poet and progenitor of the bardic Mac Vurichs of Clan Ranald ... Sir Aeneas Macpherson's version, in fact owes practically nothing to the tradition of his own clan except for some of the personal names, and should probably be held suspect as a version heavily contaminated with material drawn from Latin, Irish and French literary sources."
___________
2 "The Authors from which this is collected are Tacitus, Liber, Paslitenssis, Irish Annals, Buchanan, Spotswood, Sir George McKenzie's heraldry."



Return to the Glimpses Appendix Menu

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Posted by: Keltic 14-Dec-2003, 10:26 PM
MacPherson clan here as well. The 'a' was dropped from the name sometime between our families move from MacPherson's Mills in Pictou County, Nova Scotia to the Niagara Peninsula in Ontario.

Posted by: CelticRose 14-Dec-2003, 10:42 PM
Well welcome cousin! wink.gif thumbs_up.gif

Here is some interesting news about our clan that happened recently.

The Clan was saddened by the death of Lady Macpherson of Cluny on the 30th October, 2003 after a courageous fight against Cancer. She was 72.
She had just recently returned from the USA with her husband Sir William of Cluny after attending one of the local Clan Gatherings.

Lady Macpherson of Cluny was born Sheila Mcdonald Brodie in Bombay, India where her father worked in banking. She attended Wellington School for Girls in Ayr and after achieving secretarial qualifications she worked in London and Edinburgh as a personal assistant. One such post as PA to the head of the National Association for the Paralysed a position of which she was rightfully proud.

It was whilst in London that she met Sir William and they were married on December 27, 1962 in Edinburgh by Canon Martineau of St. Columba?s by-the-Castle. They lived in London where Sir William pursued his career in Law but Newton Castle in Blairgowrie was always seen as their family home.

She was an accomplished cook and hostess, to which her hospitality at Newton Castle bore testament. Her skills also ranged from needlework, gardening, tapestry as well as being an avid reader, to golf. She was a member of the Blairgowrie Golf Club.

Lady Macpherson will be missed greatly by Clan members not least at the many Clan Gatherings both at home and abroad. In the words of a friend, ?She was a lady of immense energy, charm and elegance.? She was always proud to wear the clan tartan and took her duty as the Clan Chief?s wife very seriously.

She is survived by Sir William, Annie, Alan, Jamie and two grandchildren Eliza and Torquil. She also leaves her sister Margaret Leith who lives in Aberdeen. Her twin sister, who lived in Buckinghamshire, died a number of years ago.

A private cremation was held at Perth. A thanksgiving service was held in Blairgowrie Parish Church on Wednesday November 12, 2003 which was well attended and the congregation were invited back to Newton Castle to hospitality that rightfully did Lady Macpherson proud.

http://www.clan-macpherson.org/lady_macpherson_of_cluny.html


Posted by: MDF3530 14-Dec-2003, 11:21 PM
Here's Clan #1 of 2 for me:
The Clan Maxwell


* Arms: Argent, a saltire Sable, (as displayed on the arms of the Earl of Nithsdale) viz:- Argent, an eagle displayed Sable, beaked and membered Gules, (Nithsdale), surmounted of an escutcheon of the first, charged with saltire of the Sceond (Maxwell), the escutcheon surcharged in the center with an urcheon, Or (Herries).
* Badge: A stag Proper, attired Argent, couchant before a holly bush Proper.
* Motto: Reviresco (I flourish again)
* Tartans: Maxwell
* Septs: Adair, Blackstock, Dinwiddie, Dinwoodie, Edgar, Herries, Kirk, Kirkland, Latimer, Latimore, Mackittrick, Maxton, Mescall, Monreith, Moss, Nithdale, Paulk, Peacock, Pollock, Pollok, Polk, Sturgeon, Wardlaw

Maccus Well, a pool in the River Tweed by Kelso, is claimed as the origin for this name. Maccus was believed to be a Norse chief who lived in the reign of David I. Sir John Maxwell, Chamberlain of Scotland, died without issue and was succeeded by his brother, Aymer, from whose sons sprang many branches of this family throughout the southwest of Scotland.

Sir Herbert Maxwell swore fealty to Edward I of England in the ragman Roll of 1296. His son, Eustace, held Caerlaverock Castle as a vassal of the English, but later followed Robert the Bruce to Bannockburn in 1314. His descendent, another Sir Herbert, was created Lord Maxwell around 1440, taking his seat as Lord of Parliament. From his second son descended the Maxwells of Monrieth, who were later to be created baronets in 1681. The fifth Lord intrigued with Henry VII of England, although by 1542 James V had appointed him warden of the marches. Maxwell was captured at the Battle of Solway Moss in the same year.

John, the seventh Lord, remained a devout Catholic throughout the Reformation, and his name was linked with a number of plots to restore Mary, Queen of Scots to her throne. After Mary's execution in England in 1687 and the defeat of the Spanish Armada the following year, Lord Maxwell continued to correspond with Philip of Spain, seeking support for a Catholic revolution. Maxwell was killed in 1593 during a feud between his family and the Johnstons, near Lockerbie. The feud continued, however, and the next Lord Maxwell shot Sir James Johnston, who was attempting to reconcile the two warring factions.

His brother, Robert, succeeded to the Maxwell title and additionally was created Earl of Nithsdale. His descendent, the fifth Earl of Nithsdale, was a staunch Jacobite who was captured at the Battle of Preston during the ill-fated rising of 1715. He was taken to London, tried and sentenced to death for treason. On the eve of his execution, with the assistance of his wife, he escaped from the Tower of London, disguised as a serving woman. The couple fled to Rome where the Earl died in 1744.

A number of the cadet branches rose to prominence in their own right, including the Maxwells of Cardoness, Monreith, Sprinkel and Pollok, each achieving the rank of baronet. Pollok House, the seat of the Maxwell Baronets of Pollok, was gifted to the city of Glasgow in 1967; in its grounds is the world-famous Burrell Collection of art.

James Clerk Maxwell, born in Edinburgh in 1831, was a physicist who made a fundamental contribution to this branch of science through his formulation of electromagnetic theory. Gavin Maxwell, the Scottish author and naturalist who died in 1969, was the youngest son of Sir Herbert Maxwell who descended from the Maxwells of Monreith.

Posted by: MDF3530 14-Dec-2003, 11:37 PM
And here's Clan #2 of 2:

ORIGINS OF THE MC LOUGHLIN FAMILY (Ireland)

There are two distinct branches of the Mc Loughlin family, the Northern branch descended from the Northern Ui Neill who were known as Mac Lochlainn and the Southern branch descended from the Southern Ui Neill who were known as Ua Maelsechnaill.

The first O Maelsechnaills were the sons of Flann Sionna (Flann of the Shannon) who reigned from 876 to 914 AD. His father was Maeleachlainn (Malachy), High King of Ireland from 844 to 860 AD Their territory was based in the modern counties of Meath and Westmeath stretching from the river Shannon to the East coast of Ireland.

The O Maoilseachlainn ruled Meath throughout the tenth and eleventh centuries but after the Anglo-Norman invasion of 1169, Hugh De Lacy took control over much of the modern county Meath pushing the O Maoilseachlainn back to their main power base around Moate.

The O Maoilseachlainn were still a powerful force throughout the following centuries exerting influence in the counties now known as Offaly and Westmeath. As late as the sixteenth century, they were still extracting rights from the MacGeoghegan family.

In the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century, many Irish names became more anglicized often dropping the O or Mac prefixes. Thus O Melaghlin became Melaghlin and eventually came to be spelled as McLoughlin. A Thomas Melaghlin served under the Spanish King in Flanders in the Seventeenth century.

Mc Loughlin Kings of Meath
Niall of the Nine Hostages' +405
Conal Cremthainn
Fearghus Cearbhaill
Diarmond
Colman Mor
Suibhne
Airmedeach Caech
Diermod Dian
Murchadh Midheach
Domhnall  High King +763
Donnchadh  High King  +797
Maolruanaidh  +843
Maoilseachlainn  (Malachy I)  High King   +862
Flann Sinna  'of the Shannon'  High King   +914
Donnchadh   High King
Domhnall   +952
Maoilseachlainn  (Malachy II)  Mor   High King   +1022
Domhnall
Conchobar   +1073
Domhnall    +1094 
Murchadh
Maoilseachlainn   +1155
Art   +1184
Cormac   +1239
Art na Caislen   +1283
Niall
Cormac ballach  +1362
Cormac
Conn   +1431
Art    +1468
Conn Mor O'Melaghlin

Posted by: High Plains Drifter 16-Dec-2003, 09:32 PM
My Scottish roots are Clan Campbell of Cawdor and my family lived near Cawdor Castle and Nairn in the 17th Century and before. I hope to go visit the area in a few years, not so much for genealogy purposes but to visit the distilleries nearby. tongue.gif

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 17-Dec-2003, 10:01 AM
I am a member of Clan Donald USA, as shown in my signature and avatar. Other clans and families in various lineages include: Abbott, Campbell, Dunbar, Fergusson, Frazier, Hogg, Livingston (Lowland family), and McCulloch. While Clan Donald is my senior paternal clan, I have the most complete information on the lineage to my Livingston and McCulloch maternal clans. Clan Donald is the largest of the clans, and for many centuries operated as virtually an independant kingdom. It has been said that:
QUOTE
The history of Clan Donald, more than that of any other clan, embodies the history of the Western Highlands 1200 - 1500: a threefold struggle between the Celts and Anglo-Saxons; between the Gaelic clan system and Teutonic feudalism, and between the semi-autonomous kingdom of the "Lords of the Isle" and the slow but inexorable growth in the might of the young but expansive Scottish state.

Even the celebrated (and somewhat overblown) rivalry between Clan Donald and Clan Campbell can be summarized within the context of these three struggles: Clan Donald desired to preserve the Gaelic system and the clan's independent kingdom; Clan Campbell, seeing the eventual domination of the Highlands by the Scottish state, sided with the state and took advantage of that allegiance to fill the power vacumn created by the destruction of the Lordship of the Isles. All the clans, even Clan Campbell, paid the price when England so brutally and decisively destroyed the entire clan system following the defeat at Culloden.

http://www.bcn.net/~macillus/ClanDon/clanhom.html

Posted by: CelticRose 19-Dec-2003, 04:21 PM
Hope this works. It should be a clan map of Scotland.

http://www.scottishradiance.com/clanmap.htm

Posted by: Elspeth 19-Dec-2003, 07:20 PM
I have not yet affiliated myself with a clan, but if I do it will be the Logan clan. None of my ancestors are of direct enough lineage to claim a place in any clan, but I do have a many great grandmother who was a Logan. I used her name in writing my last book, researching the clan in the process. Below is a little history from the Clan Logan in North America site


Historical Background:
Research has shown that the Clan LOGAN sometime in the dark past; as is the case with many of the Scottish Clans originated in Ireland. Therefore we have branchs of the Clan emigrating from Scotland and Ireland to North America and Canada.

Scotch-Irish; a term which is purely American, was used to distinguish the Presbyterian/Protestant descendents of the deported and relocated highland Scots. Who had been relocated to Northern Ireland by the English, and who emigrated to North America and Canada in the 1700's. As opposed to and distinguish them from the later Catholic immigrants from Ireland.


Ulster-Scots; another term for the Scotch-Irish, as well as the area they emigrated from. This was the part of northern Ireland in which the Scots were resettled by the English. Ulster-Scots is the name they are known by in the United Kingdom.



Clan Logan
Gaelic name: Loganaich or Macgill'innen
The Clan LOGAN is one of these Scottish groups that enmass emigrated to North America and Canada in the very early 1700's, from Ireland and Scotland. These two segments were of the same clan origins. The Clan LOGAN that emigrated from Scotland are of the Lowland Scots who originated in County Galloway. The Highland branch of the Clan claim their origins from County Ross and are closely allied with the Clan MacLennan. It was two members of this Clan LOGAN, Thomas and William Logan who were chosen to take Robert the Bruce's heart to the Holyland. To keep it from the hands of the English. While in route and in Spain they were killed in combat in 1329. The silver case containing the heart of King RObert was return to Scotland.


I believe - that there were many members of this Clan who emigrated, and therefore are directly related, by distant blood. They were all descent of the same Clan origins Logan and Mac Lennan. There is a tie therefore that in many cases is stronger than blood; the CLAN.


Prior to 1890 the Clan's had all but been forgotten; except by a few diehard Scottish Highlanders. The Caledonian District in 1890, organized a reformation of the Clan system by holding the first Highland Games. Every effort was made to restore all aspects of the Scottish Highland culture to the people.

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 20-Dec-2003, 09:52 AM
This is the story behind Clann Mac Aodhagain.

Mac Aodhagain - MacEgan
Uniquely among Irish Families the MacEgans were distinguished for learning rather than military prowess. They became, over five centuries, Ireland's most learned literary family and have left us an enormous body of medieval Irish and Latin writing. The great codices, the book of Duniry (Leabhar Braec), the Book of Ballymote and the Book of the Dun Cow (Leabhar na hUidre) are associated with them.

To Michael O Cleirigh, principal author of Annala na hEireann Baothghalach Ruadh MacAodhagain was "the most learned Irishman that ever lived". When the annals were compiled in 1636 O'Cleirigh sought an approbation from six of the most learned men in the Country for the work, the first being Flann MacAodhagain of Ballymacegan and Redwood Castle, while Baothghalach MacAodhagain, Bishop of Elphin was third on the list.

The Brehon (Judge) and Ollave (Professor) ranked among the highest in the Irish society, and the MacEgans were the outstanding hereditary holders of these offices. Throughout the annals there are numerous references to various members of the family noteworthy for their achievements in this field. As brehons and ollaves they became attached to many Irish territories and later when the Normans adopted the Irish Language, law and custom, MacEgan brehons were retained by them.

The Family is descended from Cairbre Crom, chief of Hy Many in the 6th Century and has as its eponymous ancestor Aedhagan, who flourished in the 10th century, making the surname one of the oldest in Europe. It is derived from the root 'aedh' meaning fire and the diminutive 'an' hence 'the little bright-eyed one'.

Because they were associated with the chieftains in all parts of the country their descendants are widespread. Among the O'Kennedys of Lower Ormand in North Tipperary they became particularly string. There are a number of their castles still standing, and one of these, Redwood, where a celebrated law school flourished, has now been fully restored and is owned and occupied by Chief of the Clan.

Like other Irish Families who did not conform they lost all, but preserved the educational tradition throughout the Penal Times. After Emancipation in 1829 many of the name followed their hereditary professions of teaching, law and medicine.


Pronunciation and Spelling
Mac Aodhagàin (mock-ay-gon)
The root of this name is Aedh (ay). The son of Aedh would have been Mac (mock), and gàin (gon), being the diminutive form of any word, would have been used to indicate the lesser of, (or in this case the descendant of), the root word, so Mac Aedhgàin would have been the descendant of the son of Aedh.

In the past, the spelling was Mac Aedgàin - the h having been replaced by a dot over the D. This was also seen as Aodagàin, again with a dot over the D. The first is now very seldom seen.

In the first half of the 1900's, modern Irish spelling contracted the name to Mac Aogàin, retaining the same pronunciation as the full Mac Aodhagàin, however English pronunciation changed this to Mac Egan. We currently know of only two families, one in West Kerry and one in Australia using the Mac Aogàin spelling.

The Mac Aodhagàins began in East Gallway and gradually moved to North Tipperary, just a few miles away, settling in Redwood Castle. Once there, their power as judges (brehons), to the powerful area rulers, (including the Kennedy family), kept the clan well cared for and somewhat isolated from the rest of the country. Therefore, as one moves away from the heartland, one starts to see all the various spellings of the name, mainly because no one from outside the area knew precisely how to spell it.

The name Keegan is an understandable variation as well, as there is no K in the Irish language, but, the Irish pronunciation of Mac being mock, would prompt an Englishman to include a K, therefore Mock-ay-gon, losing the Mac, became K-ay-gon, or Keegan. It is interesting to note that in Antrim, Ireland and in parts of Scotland, there are several Mac Keegan families.

In the center of Ireland, near the original Clan area, Egan is still pronounced Ay-gon. If you imagine people arriving in the US with the name Aogàin, perhaps knowing only the pronunciation, it is easy to see the formation of the differing spellings that have survived today: Eagan, Egan, Eagen, Agen, Egen, Hegane and Hagen. Egan is the spelling now most commonly used.



Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 21-Dec-2003, 06:53 AM
Sounds very much like a clan in the Druid tradition, although I suppose the use of the term Druid itself has been very much suppressed over the centuries. Certainly, the professions mentioned in association with the McEgans are very much consistent with what little I know of the historical (as distinguishesd from the romanticized or villified) Druids. A proud history, indeed!

Posted by: Aon_Daonna 22-Dec-2003, 04:33 PM
The Irish-Christian Society is nicely depicted in the "Sister Fidelma" books by Ellis Peters, which is a synonym for Peter Beresford-Ellis, Professor of Irish History.

My Irish ancestor was a Shaughnessy. Her family lived in the county clare, and were more english than irish although having an irish name.
Her family were breeders of thoroughbreds, which is how she is connected to my family. My ancestor and her met in Ireland during a hunt, while my ancestor was looking for horses to refresh the blood of his own stud.

I have no scottish ancestors but many Germans wink.gif

Posted by: Pleiades 29-Dec-2003, 12:31 AM
I am descended from the Watson Family in the Peninsula of Kintyre, Argyll County. My ancestors farmed in the area for over 400 years. My great-great grandfather emigrated to Pensylvannia in the mid 1800's. He unfortunately died not long after. His son, Robert Watson moved to the west and married Sarah Anne Cunningham in Nevada and they settled in the Tahoe City. Our family was one the founding families in Tahoe City and a museum was built in a family home along main street. My grand-father left California for the goldfields of the Yukon, Canada.. He met and married my grand-mother, Adela Stone and my mother was born as well as 3 other siblings. That's my very short version of a very interesting and difficult trek from Scoltand to the Yukon!


Posted by: Angel Whitefang (Rider) 23-Jan-2004, 01:01 AM
These are the Clans I am related to according to my Mothers Geneology and according to the tartan website. there is information I have posted in here from both places. Are any of you from any of these clans??? And this was using my Fathers Sir name Not my Mothers.

Arthur Bannatyne Burnes Burness Burnett Burns Connochie Conochie Denoon Denune Gibbon Gibson Harres Harris Hawes Haws Hawson Isaac Isaacs Iverson Kellar Keller Kissack Kissock Lorne MacArtair MacArthur MacCarter MacColm MacColmbe MacConachie MacConchie MacConnechy MacConochie MacEller MacElvie MacGibbon MacEver MacGlasrich MacGubbin MacGure MacIsaac MacIver MacIvor MacKellar MacKelvie MacKerlie MacKerlich MacKessack MacKessock MacKissoch MacLaws MacLehose MacNichol MacNocaird MacOnachie MacOran MacOwen MacPhedran MacPhun MacTause MacTavish MacThomas MacUre Moore Muir Ochiltree Orr Pinkerton Taweson Tawesson Thomas Thomason Thompson Thomson Ure;

Breadalbane names: MacDermid MacDermott MacDiarmid
Cawdor names: Caddell Cadell Calder Cattell Torrie Torry

Loudoun names: Hastings Loudon Loudoun Lowdon

Posted From the Tartan web site:

The surname Campbell, most probably derived from the Gaelic cam-beul (twisted mouth), is one of the oldest in the Highland, and a crown charter of 1368 acknowledges Duncan MacDuihbne as founder of the Campbells, who were established as Lords of Loch Awe. The founder of the Argyll line was Cailean Mór (d. 1294), whose descendant, Colin Campbell (d. 1493), 1st Earl of Argyll, married Isabel Stewart of Lorne. To this day the eldes son of the family has borne the title of Marquis of Lorne, and the marriage in 1871 of the Marquis, later 9th Duke of Argyll, to HRH Princess Louise, fourth daughter of Queen Victoria, is recalled by the two tartans bearing their names.

Throughout the fifteenth century the Campbells gave steady support to the Crown in an area where royal influence was under severe pressure, first from the rival Crown of Norway and then from the descendants of Somerled, former Lord of the Isles, with the eventual emergence of the Crown's most powerful rival in the MacDonald Lordship of the Isles. The Lordship of the Isls was broken by the Crown by the end of the fifteenth century, leaving the Campbells the main power in the area. Thereafter they continued to act as the chief instrument of central authority in the region. This long struggle for supremacy, and with it, the headship of the Gael, may be said to be the real cause for the ancient enmity between the Campbells and the MacDonalds.

Campbell support for central government brought rewards. In 1607 Archibald, seventh Earl of Argyll, was granted former MacDonald lands in Kintyre, while in 1615 Campbell of Cawdor was allowed to purchase Islay and most of Jura which had previously belonged to the Macleans of Duart.

Sir John Campbell (1635-1716), 11th Laird of Glenorchy, was created Earl of Breadalbane in 1681. Described as being "cunning as a fox, wise as a serpent, and supple as an eel... [who] knew neither honour nor religion but where they are mixed with interest", he was involved in the scheming which resulted in the Massacre of Glencoe, but no evidence of his guilt could be produced. His line was founded by the colourful crusader "Black" Colin Campbell (d. 1498), who received Glenorchy in 1432 from his father, Sir Duncan Campbell, who had ejected the MacGregors from the lands. The commander who actually carried out the infamous Massacre of the MacIan MacDonald's of Glencoe was a Campbell Chieftain of Glenlyon. The founder of the Cawdor branch, another Sir John Campbell (d. 1546). An orphan who had inherited her father's title of Thane of Cawdor, she was kidnapped in 1499 by Campbell?s father, Archibald (d. 1513), 2nd Earl of Argyll, and married to his son in 1510. The Campbells of Loudoun are descended from Sir Duncan Campbell, second of the first MacCailean Mór, who married a Crauford of Loudoun. The Earldom of Loudoun, created for John Campbell (1598-1663), politician, has since the eighteenth century descended through the female line.

Arguably the most famous Campbell of them all, Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863), commander of the Highland Brigade at Balaclava, Commander-in-Chief during the Indian Mutiny, the hero of Lucknow and Cawnpore, was not strictly a Campbell at all, being born Colin MacLiver, son of a Glasgow carpenter. His mother was a Campbell, though, and when her brother, Colonel John Campbell, took the fifteen-year-old boy to be interviewed for the Army by the Duke of York, the Duke wrote his name down as Campbell. And Campbell it remained.

The Clan Campbell is now organized world-wide in several associations and societies connected to the Clan Campbell Federation. The current Chief is the twelfth Duke of Argyll and twenty-sixth Chief. Inveraray Castle is still his family home.




What a history! and that's only part of it!!!!!

angel.gif

Posted by: CelticRose 23-Jan-2004, 01:08 AM
Whoa! What a history Angel! Thanks for sharing! Interested in hearing the rest of the story! wink.gif smile.gif

Northernlass, I have a Watson in my family line too! Sheesh! I have so much to research it is rediculous. I am overwhelmed right now. wacko.gif

Posted by: Sea Dog 23-Jan-2004, 01:14 AM
Grandmother G was a Gilchrist ( Clan Ogilvy) also Campbells on that side, have to drag out my Dad's notes. We know that the Gillette current spelling was Gillett until around 1840 in Canada where a business was painted incorrectly and it was cheaper to change the family name spelling than the business painting. (Sounds like canny Scots to me)

Mothers side family from County Cork and also her aunt did her thing for DAR so that will come in handy. 13 generations in New England.

Wifes family has Irish roots also. Just starting to follow up there but having a lot of luck in finding relatives that have been studying

Posted by: RavenWing 23-Jan-2004, 11:00 AM
OK, My Great Grandma was a Gilbert. Here is what is associated with that name.

(BTW - I will have to admit I do not take this very seriously. I have no clan affiliation, nor do I feel I need or want one.)


QUOTE
The Clan Buchanan


Arms: Or, a lion rampant Sable, armed and langued Gules, within a double tressure flory counterflory of the Second

Badge: A hand holding a tasselled cap

Branches: Arnprior, Auchmar, Carbeth, Leny, Spital.

Tartans: Buchanan, Buchanan Hunting, Buchanan Old.

Mottos: Audaces juvo (Latin: I help the brave); Clarior hinc honos (Latin: Brighter the honour hence).

Slogan: Clar Innis (Clairinch, an island in Loch Lomond).

Septs: Colman, Cormack, Cousland, Dewar, Dove, Dow, Gibb, Gibbon, Gibson, Gilbert, Gilbertson, Harper, Harperson, Leavy, Lennie, Lenny, MacAldonich, MacAlman, MacAslan, MacAslin, MacAuselan, MacAuslan, MacAusland, MacAuslane, MacAlman, MacAlmont, MacAmmond, MacAsland, MacChruiter, MacColman, MacCormack, MacCubbin, MacxCubbing, MacCubin, MacGeorge, MacGibbon, MacGreuisich, MacGubbin, MacInally, MacIndeor, MacIndoe, MacKinlay, MacKinley, MacMaster, MacMaurice, MacMurchie, MacMurchy, MacNeur, MacNuir, MacNuyer, MacQuattie, MacWattie, MacWhirter, Masters, Masterson, Morrice, Morris, Morrison, Murchie, Murchison, Richardson, Risk, Rusk, Ruskin, Spittal, Spittel, Walter, Walters, Wason, Waters, Watson, Watt, Watters, Weir, Yuill, Yool, Yule, Zuill.

The earliest family of this name came from the shores of Loch Lomond, which were granted by the Earls of Lennox to one Absalon around 1225. Absalon may have been a clergyman or from one of those families dedicated to the service of the ancient Celtic Church. Morris of Buchanan received a charter in 1282, confirming him in his lands with baronial rights. He also held the small island of Clarinch, the name of which was afterwards to become the battle-cry of the clan.

During the War of Independence, The Buchanans supported the cause of Bruce which assured the fortunes of the family. Sir Alexander Buchanan fought for the French against Henry V of England, and fought at the Battle of Beauge in Normandy in March 1421. His exploits during this battle are given as one explanation for the heraldry of the family. It's thought that Sir Alexander killed the Duke of Clarence and took his coronet as a trophy, this is the reason for the ducal cap held aloft in the crest. The shield differenced only by changing the lion and the double tressure of fleurs de lis from red to black. This is said to allude to the marriage of Sir Walter

Buchanan to the only daughter of Murdoch, Duke of Albany and Regent of Scotland. His estates were confiscated in 1425, and the regent was ultimately beheaded by his cousin, James I. His son had died childless and the Buchanans were the nearest relatives to this disinherited branch of the royal family. The arms are said to mourn the family's loss of status.

The Buchanans of Arnprior, who held lands in Perthshire around Kippen, are also descended from the chiefly family. The Lairds of Arnprior lived in some style and were nicknamed the 'kings of Kippen'. James V was fond of travelling in disguise, using a name known only to his close friends and attendants. When the king arrived at Arnprior, a grim retainer met him and advised him that the laird was having dinner and was not to be disturbed. The king asked him to tell the king of Kippen that 'the Goodman of Ballengeich is come to feast'. When Buchanan heard this, he knew the king was at his door and he begged forgiveness. The laird was killed at the Battle of Pinkie in 1547. When the last chief died in 1682, Buchanan of Arnprior was supposed to recieve the ancient lands of Buchanan, but they were sold to meet heavy debts. The Graham Dukes of Montrose now have the mansion house of Buchanan.

Distinguished poet and protestant reformer George, is possibly the most famous Buchanan. He was born at Killearn in Stirlingshire in 1506, the third son of Buchanan of Drumikill. Around 1520, he moved to Paris to continue his education and travelled around the Continent, and began a literary career. Around 1560 he returned to Scotland and in April 1562 he was appointed tutor in classics to the young Mary, Queen of Scots. Eventhough he was in with the royals, he still made vicious attacks on the queen in his writings.

He was appointed preceptor and tutor to the young James VI after the abdication of his mother, and he is generally credited with laying the foundations for that monarch's considerable academic prowess as well, unfortunately, as poisoning the child's mind against his mother.

James Buchanan was the fifteenth president of the United States of America. There has not been a recognised chief since the seventeenth century.

Clan Contacts:
Clan Buchanan Society International Inc.
PO Box 1110
Moutrie, GA, USA
31776-1110

Posted by: RavenWing 23-Jan-2004, 11:02 AM
Another Great Grandma was a Taylor

QUOTE
The Clan Cameron


Arms: Gules, three bars Or

Badges: Cameron of Lochiel, Cameron of Erracht

Branches: Lochiel, Erracht

Tartans: Cameron, Cameron Hunting, Cameron of Lochiel, Cameron of Lochiel Hunting, Cameron of Erracht.

Mottos: Aonaibh ri cheile (Gaelic: Unite), Mo righ's mo dhuchaich (Gaelic: For King and Country).

Slogan: Chlanna nan con thigibh a so's gheib sibh feail (Gaelic: Sons of the hounds come here and get flesh)

Septs: Chalmers, Chambers, Clark, Clarke, Clarkson, Cleary, Clerk, Dowie, Gibbon, Gilbertson, Kennedy, Leary, Lonie, MacAldowie, MacAlonie, MacChlery, MacLair, MacCleary, MacGillery, MacGillonie, MacIldowie, MacKail, MacKell, MacLear, MacLeary, MacLerie, MacMartin, MacOnie, MacOstrich, MacPhail, MacSorley, MacUrlig, MacVail, MacWalrick, Martin, Paul, Sorley, Sorlie, Taylor.

There are several theories concerning the origin of the name Cameron. The most probable is that the first chief, Donald Dubh was descended from the Macgillonies or from the medieval Cameron family of Fife. Donald Dubh married the MacMartin heiress of Letterfinlay and through great skill united the confederation of tribes that came to be know as Clan Cameron. Donald was born circa 1400 and he and his successors took on the title of Captains of Clan Cameron until the early sixteenth century when Ewan MacAllan had his lands of Lochiel united by charter into the Barony of Lochiel. Ewan's father, Alan MacDonald Dubh, the twelfth chief of the Clan Cameron was one of the bravest men of his time. It was under him that the long running feud between Clan Cameron and the Clan MacKintosh began.

The next prominent chief was Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel who was born in 1629 and died in 1719. Sir Ewen was an ardent enemy of the Parliamentarians and fought many great battles to preserve the independence of Clan Cameron.

He was knighted in 1682 and fought with Bonnie Dundee at Killiecrankie in 1689. Sir Ewan was beloved by his Clan and his grandson, known as the "gentle Lochiel" tried to improve the lives of clansmen.

In August of 1745, the Camerons fought along side Bonnie Prince Charlie as staunch supporters of the Jacobite cause. After that fateful year the Cameron lands were forfeit, their cattle were shot and their houses burned to the ground. In 1784 the estate was returned to the grandson of the "gentle Lochiel", Donald, subject to a large fine.

In 1793, Major Allan Cameron of Erracht raised the Camerons' own regiment, the 79th Highlanders, which became the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders in 1873 and then merged with the Seaforths in 1961 it became the Queen's Own Highlanders.

There is a Clan Cameron museum at Achnacarry and much information pertaining to the Clan may be found in the West Highland Museum in Fort William.

Clan Contacts:
Clan Cameron Association Online
Clan Phail Society in North America

Posted by: RavenWing 23-Jan-2004, 11:04 AM
Antother ancestor is a Johnson.

QUOTE
The Clan Gunn


Branches: Gunn of Banniskirk, Gunn of Kilearnan
Arms: Argent, on a sea in base undy Azure, a three-masted ship Gules, flagged of Scotland (Azure, a saltire Argent) sails furled Proper, on a chief Gules, a buckle between two mullets pierced Or

Badge: A dexter cubit arm attired in the proper tartan of the Clan Gunn, the hand Proper grasping a basket-hilted sword blad Gules, hilted Argent

Motto: Aut pax aut bellum (Either peace or war)

Tartans: Gunn

Septs: Allisterson, Anderson, Bain, Corner, Crownar, Crowner, Cruner, Davidson, Eanrig, Enrick, Galdie, Gallie, Ganson, Gauldie, Gaunson, George, Georgeson, Henderson, Inrig, Jameson, Jamieson, Johnson, Kean, Keene, MacAllister, MacChruner, MacComas, MacCorkill, MacCorkle, MacCullie, MacDade, MacDhaidh, MacEnrick, MacGeorge, MacHamish, MacIan, Mackames, Mackeamis, Mackameish, Mackean, Mackendrick, MacMains, MacManus, MacNeill, MacOmish, MacRob, MacRory, MacSheoras, MacWilliam, Magnus, Magnusson, Main, Mann, Manson, Manus, More, Neilson, Nelson, Robertson, Robinson, Robison, Robson, Rorieson, Sandison, Swan, Swanney, Thomson, Tomson, Will, Williamson, Wills, Wilson, Wylie, Wyllie

Clan Gunn's ancestral tree is mixed in origin with the earliest know inhabitants of the area, the Picts. Later the Celts, Scots, Teutons, Normans, Norse and others integrated to extend the ancestral tree.

Practically without exception, the Highland Clans chiefly lines claim descent from the Norse Vikings. Clan Gunn is no exception; tracing its beginning to King Olaf the Black of Norway. The surname Gunn derives from Gun, Gunnar, or Gunni (depending upon the intepretation of historian) who was a grandson of Sweyn the Pirate of Freswick whose family ruled the earldoms of Orkney and Caithness during the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries.

The modern lineage and Sept families stem from George Gunn, the Crowner of Caithness, born in the first decade of the 15th century and slain with several of his clansmen at the Chapel of St. Tears, near Ackergil, in July 1478.

Clans have existed in many parts of the world but it was in the Highlands of Scotland that the clan system developed most fully as a way of life. It ended with the defeat of Bonnie Prince Charlie's Highlanders on the moors of Culloden, near Inverness, on April 16, 1746.

Following this defeat, the Clan system was abolished by law and for many years all weapons were forbidden to the Highlanders, as were the tartans, clan dress, clan symbols and paraphernalia, clan music and gatherings. Even the bagpipe was forbidden as it was considered an instrument of war.. At the same time a program known as the "clearances" was carried out with the stated objective of "clearing the Highlanders from the land to make it fit for the raising sheep". It was this program that was largely responsible for the scattering of the Highlanders to the far reaches of the world. When the proscription of the Clans was lifted and King George IV toured Scotland in the 1820's (he was the first monarch to visit Scotland in 175 years), he and his court were adorned in full Highland regalia. Tartans blossomed everywhere, the Clans were revitalized and Clan societies were organized in an attempt to re-establish family ties.

Submitted by Peter Robson.

Clan Contacts:
Clan Gunn Society of North America

Posted by: Angel Whitefang (Rider) 24-Jan-2004, 08:44 AM
This Genealogy thing is very Interesting.

angel.gif

Posted by: CelticRose 24-Jan-2004, 08:21 PM
Oh it is and a lot of hard work, wouldn't you agree? Looks as though you have done a lot of work on your family! Wow! ohmy.gif

Posted by: Angel Whitefang (Rider) 25-Jan-2004, 01:11 PM
I started working on the family when I was 14, This mainly was to find my Father, Brother and 2 sisters. My Twin and I have constantly been searching for information. It wasn't until 2001 that we had any success ( I was 30 at this point). Ana (my twin) Found our Brother in California while I was on a business trip there. We found out that in 1996 Our father had passed but our 2 sisters were still alive. I contacted the eldest sister (Cathy, whom I call Sissy)and found out that the other sister was in an institution. she was seriously bi-polar and a threat to herself and those around her (her name was Pearl). Sissy came up for a weekend visit all the way from PA. After she left 9-11 happened, the day after that I got a phone call from my Brother Andre saying that Pearl had passed. There is alot more to the story but I won't bother you with the details. I am finding that Genealogy can be extremely confusing but more rewarding then most things I do. If I ask stupid questions please forgive me, It is mostly that simple answers elude me after working on the problem for so long.

Thanks,
angel.gif

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 25-Jan-2004, 03:00 PM
NEVER any stupid questions!! We have all been doing this for some time and it can be frustrating when you don't know where to look next. By all means, pick our brains. We all help each other out all the time.
Take the time to go through some of the postings in all the genealogy postings we have here and maybe that will give you some ideas on where to look next.

If you are really stuck, ask for some help. That's why we started this.

Posted by: shamalama 09-Feb-2004, 08:56 AM
Clan McCullough

user posted image

The majority of those who bear the name descend from the sept of Mac Cu Uladh or Mac Con Uladh. The Gaelic form of the name has also been Anglicized as Mac Cullach and Mac Culloch. The majority of bearers of this name are to found in Ulster, in particular in counties Antrim (where my folks left to come to America), Down, and Tyrone. The Ulster plantations were populated heavily from Scot immigrants.

The most common spelling of McCullough in Scotland was MacCulloch. It seems that the MacCullochs were spread out all over the place. They are listed as septs to the clans of MacDougall, Ross, Munroe, and Gunn, as well as living in Galloway. If you look at a map of Scotland you will see that these clans are roughly spread along the "Great Rift" going from the Irish Sea, through Loch Ness and Inverness to the North Sea. Galloway, of course is in southern Scotland. The coat of arms is McCullough of Myerton which is in Galloway.

user posted image

The first McCullough listed, it turns out, was the King of Scotland right after MacBeth (Lulach, 1057-1058). Of course, he only lasted six months, but you can't have everything.

Donald McCullough of McCullough Higlands commissioned Peter MacDonald, a tartan designer in the UK, to create a MacCulloch / MacCullough tartan and register it with the Scottish Tartan Authority.

user posted image

I have a John McCullough (1710-1799) coming over from County Antrim to America (South Carolina), but don't know how I'll get from Ulster back to Scotland.

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 09-Feb-2004, 06:57 PM
QUOTE (shamalama @ Feb 9 2004, 09:56 AM)
Clan McCullough



The most common spelling of McCullough in Scotland was MacCulloch. It seems that the MacCullochs were spread out all over the place. They are listed as septs to the clans of MacDougall, Ross, Munroe, and Gunn, as well as living in Galloway. If you look at a map of Scotland you will see that these clans are roughly spread along the "Great Rift" going from the Irish Sea, through Loch Ness and Inverness to the North Sea. Galloway, of course is in southern Scotland. The coat of arms is McCullough of Myerton which is in Galloway.


My McCulloch connection (through my mother) is to Sir Godfrey McCulloch of Galloway, baronet of Nova Scotia, who met an unfortunate end.
See http://www.myclan.com/clans/McCulloch_267/default.php
When they reached Virginia, some descendents changed their name to McCullough, which makes me wonder whether they seeking to disassociate from their ancestors, about whom the folks on the Isle of Man are reputed to have prayed: "Lord, save us from the Devil and Cut McCulloch."

Posted by: Highlander 29-Feb-2004, 08:02 PM
Clan MacKinnon is my clan. It is one of the four original families of Scotland and we are desended directly from King Alpin the 1st, the first king of Scotland. My family hails from Skye, where some of the MacKinnon's still reside. If there are any MacKinnons out there I would love to hear from you.

Posted by: Crowned1 17-Apr-2004, 10:18 AM
Well.... the sad thing is that the name "Soutar" never fits under any clan as far as I know. That is my Grandfather's (who was born and raised in Dundee, Scotland)surname. I think that my Great-Grandmother's maiden name was Anderson though, so that would associate my family with the Anderson clan...

~Crowned One king.gif

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 17-Apr-2004, 08:09 PM
Crowned1, it appears that many names are associated with Soutar. Haven't come across an actual clan but these names are linked to the main name, Soutar: FAGARD, FAGETT, FARET, FERETT, FRETTE, Hugenot families in south-east of England, mainly 17th & 18th centuries.

There doesn't look like there is any organized research for the Soutar name. No meaning or the orgin of the name. The little bit I came across, all showed that they were the head of the clan of the names above but no other real info to go with it.

Soutar even has a tartan: http://www.tartans.scotland.net/tartan_info.cfm?tartan_id=3982

Hope that helps you out a bit.

Posted by: Crowned1 17-Apr-2004, 10:42 PM
Wow! I never knew that!!! Thanks so much! biggrin.gif
We even have a tartan!! That is so great! My mom will love to see that!
*Is very excited* clap.gif

Posted by: wizardofowls 18-Apr-2004, 09:16 PM
Hello all!

I've been very frustrated in my family tree search... I can't seem to get any further back than my great-great-grandfather! sad.gif

I am only interested in my maternal tree, which is Clan McKay. My great-great-grandfather was Richard Walter McKay. My great-grandfather was Warren Lee McKay and my grandfather was Joseph Lewis McKay, all from the Meherrin area of Virginia. My internet searches have turned up nothing and none of my living relatives seem to have any additional info!

Frustrating to say the least!

The clan McKay is very interesting. Supposedly, it is the only clan that is able to trace its history all the way back to Adam and Eve!

Mottos are:
Latin: Manu Forti (With a Strong Hand)
Gaelic: Bi Tren (Be Valiant or Be True)
War Cry: Bratach Bhàn Clann Aoidh! (The White Banner of MacKay!)

Posted by: MDF3530 19-Apr-2004, 04:00 PM
QUOTE (wizardofowls @ Apr 18 2004, 10:16 PM)
Hello all!

I've been very frustrated in my family tree search... I can't seem to get any further back than my great-great-grandfather! sad.gif

You can go back a generation further than I can. Of my Scots-Irish heritage, I can only go as far back as my great-grandparents. My Great-Grandpa & Great-Grandma Maxwell were both orphans who were later adopted. I do know that my Great-Grandma's maiden name was McLoughlin.

Posted by: Arianrhod 20-Apr-2004, 06:03 AM
Greetings from Clan MacRoni !

Ciao bellas !

In Service to the Dream,
Paula

Posted by: CelticRose 21-Apr-2004, 01:08 PM
QUOTE (Arianrhod @ Apr 20 2004, 07:03 AM)
Greetings from Clan MacRoni !

Ciao bellas !

In Service to the Dream,
Paula

laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif

Pretty good Paula! thumbs_up.gif

Posted by: Arianrhod 25-Apr-2004, 09:28 AM
They did'nt call 'em ROAMin for nuttin' Rose ! wink.gif

In Service to the Dream,
Paula

Posted by: TripsMom 25-Apr-2004, 09:59 AM
My maternal side is Irish. I, too am at a brick wall in my research.
My Great Grandfather was Edward Condon from County Cork. My Great Grandmother was Margaret McCafferty from County Fermanagh, Enneskilin, N. Ireland. And that's as far as I can go. I can't find birth, marriage or death records. Can't find the emigration records. It's so frustrating! disgust.gif
On my Dad's side I've hired someone to do research because he was adopted in 1929 and I can't get anything on my own.

Posted by: coastman 07-May-2004, 03:23 PM
Tripsmom, try this site. www.proninics.gov.uk if this does not work you may have to put hppt/proninics.gov.uk This site is records in Northern Ireland. You will have to explore the site. Good Luck, I have traced my family back to Londonderry in Northern Ireland. Most Southerners are of Gaelic ancestry I could on and on about my family. Land grants in North Carolina given during the French and Indian Wars of 1755. I just love finding my long ago family.

Posted by: CelticRose 07-May-2004, 06:10 PM
Most of my family came from North Carolina too.............the Asheville area. Still have relatives living there to this day. I lived there for two years! Beautiful country and rich in history. I guess a lot of Engish, Scots and Irish came to North Carolina, from what I hear. I have all that ancestry in me..............so I am told. Can prove the English and the Irish. so far still working on the Scots.....but these stumbling blocks are getting on my nerves! cool.gif

Posted by: MDF3530 03-Jun-2004, 05:06 PM
What're your clan affiliations, be it through birth or marriage?

Mine are the Clan Maxwell and Clan MacLachlan.

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 03-Jun-2004, 06:17 PM
Clann MacAodhagain


MacEgan, Egan, Eagan, Eagen and Keegan Families

http://clanegan.org/


Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 03-Jun-2004, 07:43 PM
As indicated in my signature and avatar, my formal affiliation is with Clan Donald USA, based on my direct paternal lineage. I could also make a colorable claim to ancestors in many other clans--at least some of have no current chief. Some of the highland clans and lowland families to which I could claim membership by descent include Campbell, Frazier, McCulloch, Hogg, and Livingston.

Posted by: CelticRose 03-Jun-2004, 08:50 PM
Well from what I am told about our Scots heritage, we have both Curries and Allisons which I am told makes them both MacPherson clans.........if they were indeed part of a clan.

I have also Taylors in my family which I really need to check out which clan they would supposedly come from. I thought Cameron, but I may be wrong. unsure.gif

Posted by: WizardofOwls 03-Jun-2004, 09:51 PM
Clan MacKay here! That was my mother's maiden name, but I have been unable to track my family back more than 3 generations. sad.gif I would like to at least track back far enough to find out when my ancestors immigrated to America!

Posted by: Shamalama 04-Jun-2004, 07:34 AM
I am a McCullough.

The first McCullough listed, it turns out, was the King of Scotland right after MacBeth (Lulach in 1057). Of course, he only lasted six months, but you can't have everything. The most common spelling of McCullough in Scotland was MacCulloch. It seems that the MacCullochs were spread out all over the place. They are listed as septs to the clans of MacDougall, Ross, Munroe, and Gunn, as well as living in Galloway. If you look at a map of Scotland you will see that these clans are roughly spread along the "Great Rift" going from the Irish Sea, through Loch Ness and Inverness to the North Sea. Galloway, of course is in southern Scotland. The coat of arms is McCullough of Myerton which is in Galloway.

user posted image

Another thought is is that the McColloch/McCullough surname can be traced back to Sir Cullo O'Neil in early 14th century Scotland. The family was originally given control of the Myreton, Ardwell, and other portions of the Galloway District around 1318. Subsequent to Sir Cullo O'Neil, the family name became McCullo which appears to be the root name for all of surname variations.

user posted image

Supposedly my line left the Lowlands in the early 1600's and moved to northeast Ireland (Ulster) during the 'plantation' times, and then to America in the early 1700's, where we settled along the southern US frontier. We made our way down from Virginia to the Carolinas to Georgia (east of what would become Atlanta).

Then again, maybe we simply came from aliens. ph34r.gif


Posted by: cscunningham 05-Jun-2004, 07:37 AM
I am affiliated with Clan Cunningham USA, my avatar is our familys Coat of Arms. My grandparents immigrated from Scotland in the early 1900's and settled in Saco Maine. I have recently become active within Clan Cunningham USA and hope to Clan Cunningham representated at Highland Games and gatherings here in New Enland.

Would love to here from other members of Clan Cunningham

Posted by: TheCarolinaScotsman 05-Jun-2004, 06:22 PM
I'm proud to be a Mackay, by birth and by name. Am related to the Wallaces, Rosses, McClellands, McElwees among others. My wife traces to the McClarens and the MacPhersons.

Posted by: MacEoghainn 07-Jun-2004, 05:46 PM
My Clans are: MacEwen (Ewing is a variation on the spelling of Ewen, or in gaelic, Eoghainn), MacLachlan (Clan MacEwen is a protectorate of Clan MacLachlan), MacPherson (My paternal great-grandmothers maiden names were Clark and Gillespie). I also could affiliate with Clan Stewart, Clan Bruce, and Clan Forbes through my mother's ancestors (there are a few other Clans I could mention but I'd run out of room before I mentioned them all). I also have more than a few Irish and Welsh ancestors.

Posted by: faolin 07-Jun-2004, 09:23 PM
My clans are: Hamilton (from my paternal grandfather) , Gray ( a sept of the Sutherlands, from my maternal grandfather), and Whiteside (from my maternal grandmother). I also have an Irish connections through my paternal grandmother to the O'Dwyers. I find it sort of funny that three of these names relate to colors (or "shades" if you want to be more correct), as O'Dwyer means ?descendant of Dubhodhar? whose name meant ?black? (see, I've got Black, White and Grey tongue.gif )

Posted by: lighthouse 08-Jun-2004, 05:31 AM
My clan is McDonald and Murry I have one for Ireland which is Murphy. I cannot trace back all the way yet but As brassy as Flora was I can see me and a decident of hers. Darlene

Posted by: BluegrassLady 10-Jun-2004, 08:26 AM
My dad is a Fairbairn which makes us part of the Armstrong Clan. My great great great grandfather, Andrew Fairbairn, was born in Peebles, Scotland on Feb. 4, 1806. The next we have of him was that he was listed in the Northumberland Militia in Ontario, Canada in 1828. So, we know that in between those dates, he migrated from Scotland. He married Eliza Ann Hagerman, born July 23, 1811, in Smith Township, Ontario on Feb. 13, 1833. They had eleven children. I have quite a bit of information on the family from there to now. However, I would love to find out more of Andrew prior to 1828 or of the Fairbairn family, especially in Spotland.



The Clan Trust web site www.armstrongclan.org states in part...
In the Battle of the Standard against William in 1183 near Northallerton in Yorkshire, King Malcolm had his horse killed under him, shot through by an arrow. Fairbairn, his trusted cousin, leapt from his own horse. According to the traditional story, Fairbairn grasped the King with one hand by the thigh and set his master up onto his own horse, and sent him back into battle. That action must have astonished the good King, since a small derrick was required in those days to lift an armored man into his saddle. And to lift him onto a horse made skittish by the noise and abrupt motion of the battle must have seemed like a miracle. For his service to the crown, Fairbairn was knighted Sword of the Strong Arm, or Sir Armstrong, and granted heritable title to lands around the area of Liddesdale.

Posted by: kidclaymore 10-Jun-2004, 11:16 AM
My clans are the Lamont's and MacGregors.

Posted by: Gordon 14-Jun-2004, 12:27 PM
I am a member of Clan Munro and wear the tartan proudly. Lineage is through my paternal grandmother who's maiden last name is Munro. Through my paternal grandfather, I am able to claim MacGregor clan as well but have, as of yet, to research the genealogy so I can document the lineage.

Posted by: Camchak 14-Jun-2004, 01:42 PM
Hello,
My family name is Brister!
I wonder if someone from the area might be able to help me with the clan I would be affiliated with from these notes? Also my step-fathers name is McCright.

I show researchers have confirmed the first documented history of the family name Brister in the lowland Scotland and Northern England. Found in ancient manuscripts including the Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, the Ragman Rolls, the Hearth Rolls, parish cartularies, baptismal, and tax rolls. The first record of the name Brister was found in Lanarkshire where they were seated from very ancient times well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
The family name Brister is believed to be a descended originally from the Strathclyde Britons. This founding race of the North were a mixture of Gaelic/Celts whose original territories ranged from Lancashire in the South, northward to the south bank of the River Clyde in Scotland.
In North America, some of the first migrants which could be considered kinsmen of the family name Brister and its spelling variants were William Brewster who arrived in the ?Mayflower? and settled in Plymouth in 1620.





Posted by: Ceciliastar1 15-Jun-2004, 01:04 PM
Unforutnately, I do not really know what clan I am from. Maybe some of you can help me. My mother is german, so there's nothing from her side. All I know is that on my father's side his grandmother's name (i don't think it's her maiden name) was Sabina Patricia Brady. I think I am from the Clan Brady. It's very depressing to not know where you come from.

usaflag.gif

Posted by: Gordon 15-Jun-2004, 04:51 PM
A good resource for those looking to locate clan affiliation is http://www.tartans.com/index.php?module=tartans&func=findClan.

Cecilia, looked into your profile and saw that your last name is Adams which is a sept of Clan Gordon. You might want to see if you can't contact the clan Gordon through their website although I don't have a link for ya, sorry.



Posted by: Camchak 15-Jun-2004, 08:07 PM
If this is correct, using a variation of my sirname spelling, then:

The Clan Fraser


Arms: Fraser - Azure, 3 fraises or cinquefoils argent; Fraser of Lovat - Quarterly, 1st and 4th azure, 3 fraises or cinquefoils argent, 2nd and 3rd argent, 3 antique crowns gules

Crest Badge: Fraser - On a mount a flourish of strawberries, leaved and fructed proper; Fraser of Lovat - A buck's head erased proper

Mottos: Fraser - All my hope is in God; Fraser of Lovat - Je suis prest (I am ready)

Tartan: Fraser; dress; hunting

Gaelic Name: Friseal

Slogans:(ancient)A 'Mhor-fhaiche (The Great Field); (modern)Caisteal Dhuni (Castle Downie)

Plant Badge: Yew

Septs: Abernethy, Bissett,Brewster,Cowie, Frizell, Frew, Macgruer, Mackim, Mackimmie, Macsimon,Mactavish, Oliver, Sim, Simon, Simpson, Sims, Syme, Twaddle, Tweedie (andspelling variations thereof).

Thanks Gordon!




Posted by: Ceciliastar1 16-Jun-2004, 01:11 PM
thanks! I had no idea!

usaflag.gif

Posted by: Gordon 16-Jun-2004, 01:36 PM
Aye, your both very welcome. biggrin.gif

Posted by: Gordon 16-Jun-2004, 01:55 PM
Clan Munro here through my paternal grandmother (she's a Munro tried and true) as well as being able to lay claim to clan Gregor through my paternal grandfather. I have traced my lineage on the Munro side as far back as my great-great-great grandfather but, as of yet, have done any searches on my grandfather since there is no one in that line that can give me much information. sad.gif

I am very much interested in my ancestry and hope to continue the search at some point in the future.

Posted by: ebendigo 16-Jun-2004, 06:08 PM
I've been told that my mother's side of the family, somwhere down the line, belonged to the Douglas Clan. When we were in Scotland we went to a castle that was related to the Douglas Clan. One of the first Douglas's was Sir William Douglas who fought and died for William Wallace. His son, Sir James Douglas was a supporter and lifelong friend of Robert the Bruce.

Here is a picture of the tartan:

user posted image

-E

Posted by: Shamalama 17-Jun-2004, 09:18 AM
QUOTE (Gordon @ 16-Jun-2004, 03:55 PM)

I have traced my lineage on the Munro side as far back as
my great-great-great grandfather

McCullough/McCulloch is listed as a sept to Clan Munro.

Howdy brother!

Posted by: Gordon 17-Jun-2004, 09:54 AM
QUOTE (Shamalama @ 17-Jun-2004, 10:18 AM)
QUOTE (Gordon @ 16-Jun-2004, 03:55 PM)

I have traced my lineage on the Munro side as far back as
my great-great-great grandfather

McCullough/McCulloch is listed as a sept to Clan Munro.

Howdy brother!

Aye, and a hardy welcome to you as well cousin!!

Posted by: Ceciliastar1 17-Jun-2004, 01:00 PM
Well, it turns out my heritage is wrong. My name comes from an Americanized version of Adamczek, which is polish. All I know at this moment is that on my mom's side, we are from the Morgan's (WELSH), and on my dad's side, my grandmother is Brady, and my great-grandmother is Tiernon. Oh boy. I'm still trying to figure all this out. I don't know what my scottish heritage.

usaflag.gif

Posted by: Ceciliastar1 17-Jun-2004, 03:27 PM
So guess what I discovered? It turns out I am not from the clan Gordon, cause my last name is actually from the Polish Adamczek. Funny how it works out. But on my mother's side, I am from the family Morgon (Welsh) and on my dad's side I am from Brady (my grandfather) and Tiernan (greatgrandmother). Haven't been able to find to much on those two families.

usaflag.gif

Posted by: Blue_Rogue 18-Jun-2004, 07:41 AM
Proud represenitive of Clan Gordon here.
My mother dig some digging on our genealogy, my Great Grandfather came over here to dig for gold during California's gold rush. My father's side of the family has/still lives in Northern California.

Posted by: Annabelle 28-Jun-2004, 06:09 PM
Gordon's go by "house of Gordon", info can be retrieved thru the internet.
Annabelle Gordon

Posted by: Ladybug1258 29-Jun-2004, 08:51 AM
My paternal grandmother's maiden name was McCullough. That's the spelling that was on her headstone in our cemetary at Walnut Grove UMC in Hurdle Mills, NC. I've looked for clan affiliations but am stumped as to which one it could be as there are several linked to McCullough depending on the spelling you use. There are numerous members of the McCullough family in Hurdle Mills, Rougemont, Cedar Grove, and Hillsborough, NC but the spellings vary from one family to the next. Some spell it McCulloch, others spell it McCullock, and yet others use McCollock/ch. It's just a bit daunting to try to fingure out which one should be tied to this family name when so many spellings are used! I've tried cross-referencing to see if any overlap, but it's like a tiger chasing it's tail. Once I thingk it's solved, another spelling pops up! Nonetheless, I still want to know more about her. I never met her, but would love to have known her. I'm not sure why.

Posted by: Gordon 29-Jun-2004, 07:30 PM
QUOTE (Ladybug1258 @ 29-Jun-2004, 09:51 AM)
My paternal grandmother's maiden name was McCullough. That's the spelling that was on her headstone in our cemetary at Walnut Grove UMC in Hurdle Mills, NC. I've looked for clan affiliations but am stumped as to which one it could be as there are several linked to McCullough depending on the spelling you use. There are numerous members of the McCullough family in Hurdle Mills, Rougemont, Cedar Grove, and Hillsborough, NC but the spellings vary from one family to the next. Some spell it McCulloch, others spell it McCullock, and yet others use McCollock/ch. It's just a bit daunting to try to fingure out which one should be tied to this family name when so many spellings are used! I've tried cross-referencing to see if any overlap, but it's like a tiger chasing it's tail. Once I thingk it's solved, another spelling pops up! Nonetheless, I still want to know more about her. I never met her, but would love to have known her. I'm not sure why.

Ladybug, check this link out. It may be of help to you.

http://gregoryology.com/McCullough.htm

Also, with the spelling you've given, it seems to be a sept of http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/ntor/ross.html

Posted by: Shamalama 30-Jun-2004, 08:53 AM
QUOTE (Ladybug1258 @ 29-Jun-2004, 10:51 AM)

My paternal grandmother's maiden name was McCullough.

Ladybug1258, I've started a thread over at CelticRadio.net -> Celtic Nations -> Gathering of the Clans for McCullough information.

Posted by: MacErca 30-Jun-2004, 03:11 PM
Clan Fergusson here.

Posted by: Angel Whitefang (Rider) 18-Jul-2004, 03:20 PM
After some more family research it has come to light that my Paternal (I think that is the name for my Father's Mothers side of the family) GrandMother was a Keegan.
Is that Scot or Irish or what?? So I have Prescott on my Mothers side and Keegan on my Fathers.....................wow am I confuzzled!

Posted by: Catriona 18-Jul-2004, 03:36 PM
Angel - the name Keegan is Irish.

Posted by: Angel Whitefang (Rider) 21-Jul-2004, 11:15 PM
hug.gif Cat!!! Thank You!!! biggrin.gif I appreciate you helping me on this one.

So we have Torri that is Italian & Scot (I did the research on that one myself)
or is the spelling Scott ???
Keegan That is Irish
and Prescott is English & Irish both??? (is that correct)

angel.gif

Posted by: Catriona 26-Jul-2004, 07:20 AM
QUOTE (Angel Whitefang (Rider) @ 22-Jul-2004, 06:15 AM)
hug.gif Cat!!! Thank You!!! biggrin.gif I appreciate you helping me on this one.

So we have Torri that is Italian & Scot (I did the research on that one myself)
or is the spelling Scott ???
Keegan That is Irish
and Prescott is English & Irish both??? (is that correct)

angel.gif

I've seen the name Torrie and Torrey (spellings) in Scotland, but not with an 'i' ending..... that is most unusual in Scotland - so probably Italian, as you say...


Prescott is, so far as I know, English in origin from Devonshire... That's not to say that the name did not appear in Ireland (or even Scotland, for that matter!) just htat its origins were English.

Posted by: McIntyrant 27-Jul-2004, 02:12 PM
My surname is McIntyre, and in my background I have other Scottish surnames, such as Gibb (Buchanan), Stewart, MacPherson, and Turner (Lamont). I am a member of Clan MacIntyre Association (CMA) and the Clan Buchanan Society International, Inc. I enjoy convening for the CMA any chance I get. Going to Highland games and Celtic festivals is a real kick for me.

Posted by: Macfive 02-Aug-2004, 06:11 PM
Just a note that we have merged the two Clan Affiliation threads into one super big thread under the "Gathering of the Clans" forum.

Posted by: Cragganmore 03-Aug-2004, 08:14 PM
I'm a member of the Scottish Clan Barclay. I'm a Barclay by name and my Great Grandfather came to the U.S. from Glasgow. The Clan historically held lands in Kincardine and other spots near Aberdeen.

http://www.clanbarclay.com

This brief historical overview of the surname is the official history of the surname and is made available by Clan Barclay International. More information and details of family history can be obtained from:

Barclay, Leslie. The History of the Scottish Barclays, reprinted with an index and glossary by Carolyn L. Barkley, FSA Scot. Lovettsville, Va.: Willow Bend Books, 1995. (Purchase information may be requested by e-mail: [email protected] ).

Roger de Berchelai came to England with William the Conqueror and was granted Berkeley Castle in Gloucestershire. This early form of the name was believed to be the Anglo-Saxon version of 'beau' meaning beautiful, and 'lee', a meadow or field. Roger was mentioned in the Domesday Book as well as his son, John. In 1069 John de Berchelai accompanied Margaret (later St. Margaret) to Scotland. In gratitude for his service, King Malcolm (Canmore) granted him the lands of Towie, near Turriff, in Aberdeenshire, as well as the title, Barclay of that Ilk. 900 years of Barclay history in Scotland descend from John's three sons, Walter, Alexander, and Richard.

In the early days of violence, there was a black day when a nunnery was plundered by the Towie Barclays. Following this event, Thomas the Rhymer wrote the following lines:

Towie Barclay of the Glen Happy to the maids But never to the men.

This curse was said to haunt the male-heir. It was a belief held so strongly that in 1755, it was given as a reason for the heir's sale of Towie Barclay Castle, which then passed into the keeping of the Governors of Robert Gordon's Hospital in Aberdeen. No Barclays have lived in the Castle since.

The Barclays formed important alliances and held land throughout the north-east of Scotland, principally Towie, Mathers, Gartley and Pierston in Aberdeenshire. They also settled in Banff, Collairnie in Fife, Brechin in Forfarshire and Stonehaven in Kincardineshire. One family line settled on the west coast in the Ardrossan and Kilbirnie areas in Ayrshire. Throughout Scotland, they played important roles in national affairs. Sir David Barclay was one of Robert the Bruce's chief associates and was present at many of his battles. Sir Walter de Berkeley, Gartley III, Lord Redcastle and Inverkeillor, was Great Chamberlain of Scotland 1165-1189. Alexander de Berkeley, Gartley IX, became Mathers I in 1351 when he married Katherine Keith, sister of the Earl Marischal. Their son Alexander was the first to adopt the Barclay form of the surname. Sir George Barclay, Gartley XIX, was Steward of the household of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a later Sir George was second in command of James IV forces in the Highlands in the 1689.

One of the major Barclay families was established at Urie near Stonehaven in Kincardineshire. The first Laird, Colonel David Barclay, was a professional soldier serving with such armies as that of Gustavus Adolphus. He returned home when civil war broke out and serviced as a colonel of a regiment of horse fighting for the king. Following his retirement and the conclusion of the war, he was confined in Edinburgh Castle where he was converted to the Society of Friends (Quakers). His son Robert, Urie II, was widely known for his Apologia, described on the title page as being an Explanation and Vindication of the Principles and Doctrines of the People called Quakers. It was published in 1659 when Robert was twenty-seven, becoming widely influential, was then translated into all the European languages. He was friends with the leading Quakers of his day, George Fox and William Penn. Together, they were responsible for the idea of a city of brotherly love to be built in America. Instrumental in settling the east coast of the American colonies, Robert was appointed life governor by the proprietors of East New Jersey who granted him 5,000 acres of land. Robert's second son, David, left Urie and went to London and was apprenticed to a City Company where he became a merchant and a rich man. His second wife was the daughter of John Fream, goldsmith, whose premises in Lombard Street became a banking center as the site of the Barclay's Bank. Wealth, however, did not corrupt the family's strict Quaker principles. David acquired an estate in Jamaica, freeing the slaves there and teaching them trades many years before the passing of laws against the institution of slavery. He entertained George III at his house in London for one of the Lord Mayor's processions, and he and his family were excused from kneeling to the King due to their Quaker beliefs. He refused a knighthood and preferment for his son at Court saying that 'He preferred to bring up his sons in honest trades'.

The last Laird of Urie, Captain Robert Barclay-Allardyce (Allardyce added when he married an heiress of that name whose lands were added to those of Urie), was known as the Great Pedestrian. Many tales exists of his walks over the Scottish hills, such as his walk from Urie to Crathynaird (28 miles), staying less than an hour and then walking home again the same day. His most famous record, however, was that of walking 1,000 miles in 1,000 hours. This he accomplished over a measured mile on Newmarket Heath, subject of about 100,00 wagers and before large crowds. This feat was accomplished in 1809 and five days later, he embarked with his regiment for the Walcheren Expedition in the Napoleonic Wars.

In 1621, Sir Patrick Barclay (Towie XVII) issued a letter of safe conduct for John and Peter Barclay, merchants in the town of Banff to settle in Riga on the shores of the Baltic where they became silk merchants and burghers. He was created a Prince by the Czar and his portrait hangs in the Hermitage in St. Petersburg. From them was founded the Russian line. Michael Andreas Barclay, born 1761, and descended from Peter, the original immigrant, entered the Russian Army with his two brothers. By 1806, Michael was in command of one of the Russian divisions sent to support Prussia against the French. He gained distinction at the battles of Wagram and Eylau. At the later, he had his horse shot out from under him and was severely wounded. He was made Minister of War in 1810 and two years later was given command of the Russian Armies against Napoleon. He invented the policy of 'scorched earth', retreating and hiburning until starvation and cold forced Napoleon into the terrible retreat from Moscow. In 1815, Michael was elevated by the Czar to Field Marshal Prince Michael Barclay de Tolly and was made a Count of the Holy Roman Empire. From England, George III bestowed upon him a G.C.B. The Prince came to London to receive this honor and met Colonel Sir Robert Barclay (Towie XXV) to whom he declared himself to be 'perfectly acquainted with his descent from the Barclays of Towie in Scotland'.


Posted by: CelticRose 06-Aug-2004, 09:26 PM
QUOTE (Macfive @ 02-Aug-2004, 07:11 PM)
Just a note that we have merged the two Clan Affiliation threads into one super big thread under the "Gathering of the Clans" forum.

Okay, well see you all there! smile.gif

Posted by: CelticRose 07-Aug-2004, 05:08 AM
QUOTE (CelticRose @ 19-Dec-2003, 05:21 PM)
Hope this works. It should be a clan map of Scotland.

http://www.scottishradiance.com/clanmap.htm

Well the map was supposed to have been bigger than this...............sorry about that! sad.gif

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 07-Aug-2004, 09:23 AM
QUOTE (Angel Whitefang (Rider) @ 18-Jul-2004, 05:20 PM)
After some more family research it has come to light that my Paternal (I think that is the name for my Father's Mothers side of the family) GrandMother was a Keegan.
Is that Scot or Irish or what?? So I have Prescott on my Mothers side and Keegan on my Fathers.....................wow am I confuzzled!

Angel, this is the web page to fill you in on the Keegan side of your family.

http://clanegan.org/

Posted by: MacAibhistin 27-Aug-2004, 08:26 PM
I am a bit late joining this thread, but I curious to see who I may be related to one way or another. Interesting, all of these family lines ended up in Nova Scotia.

My Scottish clan affiliations are:

Keith, through the Austin sept
MacLeod of Raasay
Munro
MacKay
Ross
Beaton

My Irish clan affiliations:
O'Dwyer
Doherty (Dochartaigh)
Cullen

Any fellow clansfolk out there?

Rory MacA

Posted by: CelticRose 28-Aug-2004, 03:06 PM
Ooh! Rory! If I am not mistaken, I think that Wizardofowls is a MacKay! Check with him! smile.gif

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 06-Sep-2004, 04:48 PM
QUOTE (Camchak @ 14-Jun-2004, 03:42 PM)
Hello,
My family name is Brister!
I wonder if someone from the area might be able to help me with the clan I would be affiliated with from these notes? Also my step-fathers name is McCright.

I show researchers have confirmed the first documented history of the family name Brister in the lowland Scotland and Northern England. Found in ancient manuscripts including the Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, the Ragman Rolls, the Hearth Rolls, parish cartularies, baptismal, and tax rolls. The first record of the name Brister was found in Lanarkshire where they were seated from very ancient times well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
The family name Brister is believed to be a descended originally from the Strathclyde Britons. This founding race of the North were a mixture of Gaelic/Celts whose original territories ranged from Lancashire in the South, northward to the south bank of the River Clyde in Scotland.
In North America, some of the first migrants which could be considered kinsmen of the family name Brister and its spelling variants were William Brewster who arrived in the ?Mayflower? and settled in Plymouth in 1620.

Dale,

I remembered reading your post from some time ago and I happened to come across your clan affiliation. This is the web page for them.

http://www.bristowassociation.org/

Posted by: Camchak 06-Sep-2004, 10:45 PM
Thanks! I will look into this right now! biggrin.gif

Posted by: ANNHAM 10-Sep-2004, 10:14 PM
Hello All,
After reading a few posts here last night, I have tried looking up my family name's clan associations and don't know if I am on the right track...

I was looking for a clan associated with the family name ***.
I found that MacKeogh, Keohoe, O'Hoey, *** and several other names are all associated with the Clan, O'hEochaidh..
But I am not sure exactly what I am looking for..
Can anyone help?

My ***s were said to have been Scotch Irish and first came to US in New England somewhere, then possibly migrated to PA and then to WV.
I also have some Hannon ancestors from Green Co. PA, who I think were originally from Ulster around 1750.

Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Thanks,
Anne

Posted by: MacAibhistin 10-Sep-2004, 10:56 PM
There are a few problems with doing research by "clan associations". One inaccuracy I often see with those doing Scottish research is that people will often look at a book or website on clans, find that their names is associated with this or that clan, and then they are buying kilts and crests, etc. thinging that they represent their family. Well, often times it is not that simple.

In Scotland, and Ireland, most people prior to 1800 (earlier in Ireland) lived on land owned by a clan chief. So for example, it was entirely possible to have MacIntoshes living on land owned by the chief of clan MacLeod. The MacIntosh family, therefore, were members of clan MacLeod. In my case, I had Beatons (for which there is a tartan and other marketable items) who were actually members of the clan MacLeod of Lewis. My Ross ancestors were members of clan MacDonalds of Sleat (eventhough there was a large and powerful clan Ross).

The reality is that clan culture as we know it today does not often reflect the historical reality. Your best bet is to start researching your specific ancestors as generalising by names is rarely helpful. I hope this is helpful to some of you guys.

Thanks,
Rory

Posted by: ANNHAM 11-Sep-2004, 02:38 PM
Thanks Rory,
That makes sense smile.gif
Anne

Posted by: bubba 19-Sep-2004, 11:15 AM
My associations are MacNeil of Barra through the MacGrail sept and Hamilton. The ones that came to America mostly seem to have come to Massachussetts and scattered all over the place from there.

Posted by: WizardofOwls 19-Sep-2004, 11:54 AM
I'm sorry but what I am about to write is offtopic.gif

Please forgive me! smile.gif

I just wanted to say welcome to Bubba since I don't think that I have met him yet! I am so glad you found us! The whole purpose of this place is to have a good time! So jump in and enjoy the great conversation and music! I think you'll find that some of the nicest people to be found anywhere on the net are right here!

Welcome to the family! And I hope you'll visit with us often as you can!

Now, back to your regularly scheduled programming! angel_not.gif

Posted by: bubba 19-Sep-2004, 05:35 PM
Thank you kindly for the welcome. I expect I'll be around often.

Posted by: celticwoodsman 20-Sep-2004, 08:11 AM
Quick post:

MacDonald of the Isles here, via the Brady's in Rhode Island USA, & NY USA

Posted by: CelticRose 20-Sep-2004, 04:23 PM
Wizard! You are so funny and kind! A big welcome to Bubba too!

Posted by: sprdleyb 22-Sep-2004, 02:21 PM
Clan MacDuff from the kingdom of Fife. Emigrated in the 1870's

Sláinte beer_mug.gif

Brad

Posted by: fast_talker70 25-Sep-2004, 10:20 AM
As can be seen, I have not chosen a clan as of yet. I'm very interested in doing so, but dont know where I would be the MOST affiliated. Im having trouble finding the strongest link. My father s grandmother was a Warren, his step father was a Rose. I know Rose is scotch, what about Warren? My mother was a Wood, her mother a Ford. Can anyone help shed light on links with any of these names with a celtic clan? I have found Rose Info, but as I said, that was a step grandfather(I have been proud to be affiliated and consider him my Grandfather, so have no problem with affiliating with the clan if I have no closer relation). I have found a little info on Woods, but I'm somewhat confused on there standing as a clan or a sept.Any help is appreciated. Would like to find clan tartan,badge,seal,etc...

Thanks a bunch all!! fast_talker70

P.S My first name is Craig-gaelic for "one who lives in the crags", Mom must have known i was going to spend my life between a rock and a hard place!!

Posted by: CelticRose 25-Sep-2004, 03:22 PM
On Fast Talker if you find any info on Wood, let me know. My husband is a Wood and I know he already has a lot of Scots ancestry.

Posted by: Avonlea22 25-Sep-2004, 03:35 PM
Speaking of finding a clan affiliation...

My last name is Wilson. Wilson is one of the top 30 last names in Ireland. My Grandfather was born in County Tyrone, N. Ireland.

My question is simple, I think. Are the Scots Wilson's and the Irish Wilsons related? Did they start out as one happy family? Do I actually have Scots roots as well? Can I claim The Wilson Clan of Scotland?

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 25-Sep-2004, 03:52 PM
Wood and its variant spellings appears to be part of Clan Watson. See http://members.aol.com/enewman375/page/page2.html

Posted by: MacAibhistin 25-Sep-2004, 05:27 PM
Brian, yes the Wilsons of Co. Tyrone came there as part of a largely failed experiement to supplant the Catholic inhabitants of the region of NI. The Wilsons were from the Lowlands of Scotland. (an you'll find plenty in Northern England as well).

Fast Talker, the best way to make a clan connection, if there even is one, is trace your family back to the country of origin. The names you mentioned Rose, Wood, Ford, etc. are all found largely in England, but also in Lowland Scotland. Rose is probably a 50/50 shot. Even if you do find them in Scotland, to establish a true legitimate link with a Highland clan, or Border clan is nearly impossible. The key to to find your ancestors on the land owned by a clan chief. Then, you would claim historical allegiance to that clan. Good luck in your searching. It is fun, rewarding, and also frustrating and time consuming.

Rory MacA

Posted by: bubba 25-Sep-2004, 06:24 PM
QUOTE (MacAibhistin @ 25-Sep-2004, 05:27 PM)
It is fun, rewarding, and also frustrating and time consuming.

Rory MacA

and it can get pretty expensive

Posted by: CelticRose 25-Sep-2004, 06:39 PM
QUOTE (Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas @ 25-Sep-2004, 04:52 PM)
Wood and its variant spellings appears to be part of Clan Watson. See http://members.aol.com/enewman375/page/page2.html

Oh thank you so much, Mailagnus! That makes two clan affiliations that my husband could be part of. He has Currie too which is of the MacPherson clan. I knew he had a lot of Scots ancestry;however, the only one really excited about it all is me! He has no interest in his ancestry whatsoever! rolleyes.gif He is American as far as he is concerned!

Posted by: Avonlea22 26-Sep-2004, 09:27 AM
QUOTE (MacAibhistin @ 25-Sep-2004, 07:27 PM)
Brian, yes the Wilsons of Co. Tyrone came there as part of a largely failed experiement to supplant the Catholic inhabitants of the region of NI. The Wilsons were from the Lowlands of Scotland. (an you'll find plenty in Northern England as well).

Rory, Thanks so much for that information. I was so excited to read that I actually have Scots roots. I was like "Woohooo!!!" Now I can proudly wear my kilt when I finally get it. smile.gif

Posted by: fast_talker70 26-Sep-2004, 09:33 AM
MacAibhistin, Thank you. I will be working on tracing my roots backword in hopes to find the place of origin, and to track down civil war vets. I have info on my G G Grandfather on my mothers side that puts the family in Smyrna county New York at about 1850s. How would I find out where they emigrated from? This is the Wood Line. Also My mothers Grandmother was a Walker. Her Mother was a Kitchen. Any Ideas on these names?
Thank you for the help, and if you have a web site that you know I could go to for these answers unstead of taking up so much time and space here, I would love to know of it.

Celticrose, I am from southern Michigan, and if youve read the previous paragraph, youll see what little info I have on my line of the Wood Family I hail from. If this is interesting to you, or your husband and I share any blood, Ill make sure to get you a more complete history as I know it, Including some really cool stories of G G Grandad Wood. Quite a charachtor indead!


Thanks again all.

Posted by: CelticRose 27-Sep-2004, 04:22 PM
Fast Talker.............how come you don't have an avatar? wink.gif biggrin.gif We need to see what you look like or would like to look like! LOL

Oh anything you come up on the Wood family would be great. My husband's family has tried to do some research and come up with nothing! sad.gif

Posted by: Tassiecelt 27-Sep-2004, 04:37 PM
On my mothers' side I am associated with the Morrison Clan, they came from the Isle of Lewis, the name was originally derived from Son of Mor, and became Mor-son/Morrison, and is obviously of Scandinavian origin.

The have a love tartan, well a few, I have two of them.

Posted by: MacAibhistin 27-Sep-2004, 10:00 PM
MacAibhistin, Thank you. I will be working on tracing my roots backward in hopes to find the place of origin, and to track down civil war vets. I have info on my G G Grandfather on my mothers side that puts the family in Smyrna county New York at about 1850s. How would I find out where they emigrated from? This is the Wood Line. Also My mothers Grandmother was a Walker. Her Mother was a Kitchen. Any Ideas on these names?
Thank you for the help, and if you have a web site that you know I could go to for these answers unstead of taking up so much time and space here, I would love to know of it
.

FastTalker, It gets tougher the further back you go. You want to look at things like petitions for land grants, church records for deaths, christenings, etc. These will help you associate children with parents. You need to get yourself back to the immigrant generations before you can make your leap to a mother country. Some census records recorded country of family origin, but I am not familiar with the census records of NY. You'll probably need to spend some time in an archives for Smyrna County. Walker is another name that appears in Ireland, England, and Scotland. Generally it is Lowland Scottish. Kitchen is originally German, but appears in England as a result of the Saxon migrations of the 6-8th centuries. A help in determining Scottish and Irish families is religion. The Scots and Ulster Scots were largely Presbyterian (some Highland Scots families were Catholic). Native Irish largely Catholic and the English Anglican (Church of England, also known as Episcopal), Methodist, Congregationalist, or Baptist.

I do have some sites. I'll get the URLs and post them later.

Rory


Posted by: Balachasen 02-Oct-2004, 06:54 PM

Slainte mhath Elspeth,

I have Maclennan ancestry on my mother's side from Tyneside, originally from Kintail, Highlands.
Tyneside was a common place for Maclennan women to meet up with their fisherman husbands who had left Kintail on fishing trips.

Mar sin leat,

Balachasen
Raff Dellavaris

Posted by: Annham 04-Oct-2004, 10:07 PM
Well, I don't have a "clan" yet... My names are Hoy... and Hannen or Hannon...
But I really don't know what areas they came from... and don't have time to try to find out. I do have a book about the Hannon/Hannen/Hennen's in US if anyone is connected with them... would be glad to try to look them up.
Anne angel_not.gif

Posted by: cori 23-Oct-2004, 02:52 PM
How does a person know which clan they are affiliated with? I looked on tartans.com, but without having a list or something to start with, how can I find it?


Posted by: cori 24-Oct-2004, 03:44 PM
Well, I found that every time I search my surname it comes up with the clan McTavish. Does this mean that is the one I am conneted to? Also, the tartan they showed me looks nothing like the one I wear. Are there more than just one for each name? Is there a difference between an Irish clan and a Scottish clan or are they related?

Once I find the correct tartan/plaid, where can I purchase enough to make a garment?

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 26-Oct-2004, 08:09 PM
QUOTE (cori @ 24-Oct-2004, 05:44 PM)
Well, I found that every time I search my surname it comes up with the clan McTavish. Does this mean that is the one I am conneted to? Also, the tartan they showed me looks nothing like the one I wear. Are there more than just one for each name? Is there a difference between an Irish clan and a Scottish clan or are they related?

Once I find the correct tartan/plaid, where can I purchase enough to make a garment?

Leslie, if you are Irish, most likely, there won't be a tartan for your clan. Irish clans, don't have tartans. There are only county tartans for Ireland. Some Irish clans are now beginning to design tartans but there are very few.

Some Scottish folks on here can probably fill you in on the Scottish tartans much better than I can but I know there are some threads in the General Discussion area that may explain what you need to know. You may have to dig back a few pages to find them.

Once you feel confident that you have found the proper clan that you belong to, finding material won't be to difficult. You may have to order it from Scotland or England but there are some suppliers here in the U.S. Just do a search on Google.

Posted by: Monarch's Own 10-Dec-2004, 07:11 PM
So far I found out that my husband is coming from his Greatgrandmothers (paternal) side from Scotland. The name is Bean which is supposed to be a member of Clan McBean. And the one we traced back from the Bean family was born in Invernesshire. So I guess my husband is now elgible to wear a clan tartan.

From his mother's side he is an Anderson. Since they landed here in the US in the New England states and Canada and my husband and his family are from there I am almost convinced that he is also affiliated with Clan Anderson but I still need to research there a lot more.

Myself I can't affiliate so far with any clan - being german and only related to the royal and noble houses there I doubt there will be any clan affiliation in any way.

But since my husband is also US Army and they came out with a the new US Army tartan that will be also a choice for him. I like the idea to get my husband in a kilt and hope he will be convinced to wear it. I guess I have to get him used to wear it at home first. LOL

angel_not.gif thumbs_up.gif

Posted by: Aragorn 10-Dec-2004, 10:27 PM
Clan Keith here need to do a bit more research to find my roots.

Posted by: PiperJR 26-Jan-2005, 08:24 PM
Clan Ross. I am efforting to find my exact lineage before or trip to Scotland this summer. I would like to see if there are distant cousins there to visit while we are there.



Clans In Gaelic, ros means promontory -- the dominant feature of Easter Ross. From this, the ancient Celtic O'Beolain Earls of Ross and the people take their name. They are known in the Highlands as Clann Gille Aindrias, the children of Andrew...

The Clan Ross

* Arms: gules, three lions rampant Argent, armed and langued Azure
* Badge: A hand holding a garland of Juniper.
* Motto: Spem successus alit (Success nourishes hope)
* Tartans: Ross, Ross, hunting, Ross, dress.
* Plant Badge: Juniper
* Septs: Anderson Andison Andrew/s Corbet/t Crow/e Croy Denoon Denune Dingwall Duthie Fair Gair Gear Gillanders Hagart Haggart MacAndrew MacCullie MacCulloch MacLullich MacTaggart MacTear MacTier MacTire Taggart Tullo Tulloch Tyre Vass Wass


In Gaelic, ros means promontory -- the dominant feature of Easter Ross. From this, the ancient Celtic O'Beolain Earls of Ross and the people take their name. They are known in the Highlands as Clann Gille Aindrias, the children of Andrew.

Sir Farquhar Mac an t-Sagairt (son of the priest), hereditary Abbot of Applecross, was made first Earl of Ross in 1235 by King Alexander II, for military services. William, third Earl, led the men of Ross and Sutherland at Bannockburn in 1314 under Robert the Bruce. He signed the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320, marking independence from England. Hugh, fourth Earl, died leading the Scots army at Halidon Hill in 1333. As punishment for not supporting King David II, the fifth Earl Williams's lands and title passed in 1372 to Sir Walter Leslie and then, through the female line of the Countesses of Ross, to the Lords of the Isle. John, tenth Earl and fourth Lord of the Isles, forfeited the Earldom to the Scottish crown in 1476, after conviction for treason.

Hugh of Rarichies took the surname Ross, after the county, in 1357. Upon the death of his half-brother, the fifth Earl William, in 1372 he became first Chief of Clan Ross and first Laird/Baron of Balnagowan. For over three centuries the Rosses of Balnagowan passed the title from father to son. The twelfth Laird, David, incurred considerable debt raising a regiment of clansmen in support of Charles II. Taken prisoner at the Battle of Worcester in 1651, he died in the Tower of London. The thirteenth Chief and Laird of Balnagowan, David, died childless and in debt in 1711. The estate and titles were purchased by Frances Stewart, then by the Rosses of Hawkbead (an unrelated Lowland family descended from the Norman de Ros) and on to the Lockhart Rosses.

In 1903, Miss Sarah Williamson Ross of Pitcalnie, descended from the Celtic O'Beolain Earls, was recognized by the Lord Lyon as Chief. Her sister, Miss Rosa Ross, succeeded in 1957 until her death in 1968. The Chiefship and arms then transferred to the House of Shandwick, also descended from the Earls of Ross, with David Campbell Ross of Ross as twenty-ninth Chief of the Clan.

Posted by: nightbird 27-Jan-2005, 12:12 AM
I'm affiliated with the Scottish Clan Murray. My family is based in Milford, Connecticut. If anyone has any info on the Murray Clan, it would be greatly appreciated...


Posted by: Avonlea22 27-Jan-2005, 06:06 PM
QUOTE (cori @ 23-Oct-2004, 03:52 PM)
How does a person know which clan they are affiliated with? I looked on tartans.com, but without having a list or something to start with, how can I find it?

cori - try http://www.clanfinder.com/foreverscotland/clanfinder.asp


Posted by: Shamalama 28-Jan-2005, 11:05 AM
Hail, Brother PiperJR! Clan McCullough (Mac Cullaich) is a recognized sept of the mighty Ross Clan.


Posted by: Colin 28-Jan-2005, 02:09 PM
I am affiliated with many Scottish Clans. On my mother's side I have MacKenzie, MacKay, Ross, Matheson, and MacLeod. On my father's side I have Wood (sept of Wtson, which is a sept of Buchanan), Douglas, and some Stewart.

I am a member of the Clan MacKenzie Society Canadian Chapter. I could list all that I have learned about one of my clans, but it would fill up pages and pages.

As for the Wood side of the family I have found out some interesting stuff. For example, the Wood branch that I am from was linked to the Harrods of Harrods Department store (still waiting for my share of the buy out deal?! rolleyes.gif ). Electric Scotland offers this for the Wood Clan
QUOTE
The name Wood was previously given as de Bosco? a Norman name.
In the mid 15th century Andrew Wood was employed by James III to protect the Scottish trade with Holland.

In 1481 he defended Dumbarton against a fleet of Edward IV of England. James III granted him lands at Largo and bestowed a Knighthood upon him.

During the battle of Sauchieburn Andrews ships sailed up and down the Forth taking on board the wounded. Sir Andrew was the greatest seafarer of his time.

In 1488 and in 1490 he destroyed English fleets sent to attack the Scottish fleet. After the battle of Flodden he was sent to France to invite the Duke of Albany to assume the regency of Scotland.


Check out this source for some great Clan information:
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/index.html

Posted by: Gordon 30-Jan-2005, 10:54 AM
QUOTE (nightbird @ 27-Jan-2005, 01:12 AM)
I'm affiliated with the Scottish Clan Murray. My family is based in Milford, Connecticut. If anyone has any info on the Murray Clan, it would be greatly appreciated...

Nightbird,
Your family is from my area! I was born and raised in Milford and only moved to Texas when I was 26.
As for info on the Murray clan, check out http://www.clanmurray.org. The site contains contact info, upcoming events, and other pertinent facts. A possibility they may have, is help in tracing lineage. My clan has a genealogist who gathers info on new members and places it within the clan. They also offer help, at a fee naturally, to members who wish help in researching. I realize it may not be much, but if your anything like most of us who are doing the research, any leads are always a help. Hope this is one that will prove fruitful.

Posted by: gwenlee 19-Feb-2005, 01:01 PM
I'm a member of Ross Clan Assoc USA. When you join they request you send your geneology to them. The organization has someone who stores the information. On the site there is also a message board for those doing research. I have found several distant cousins on this site.

Like a lot of people I am eligible to be a member a several clans. I am a Ross/Macdougall from my mother's side and Donnachaidh/Lamont from my fathers side. I'm most active with Clan Donnachaidh.

Posted by: maggiemahone1 19-Feb-2005, 04:15 PM
QUOTE (gwenlee @ 19-Feb-2005, 12:01 PM)
I'm a member of Ross Clan Assoc USA. When you join they request you send your geneology to them. The organization has someone who stores the information. On the site there is also a message board for those doing research. I have found several distant cousins on this site.

Like a lot of people I am eligible to be a member a several clans. I am a Ross/Macdougall from my mother's side and Donnachaidh/Lamont from my fathers side. I'm most active with Clan Donnachaidh.

Here is a little info I have gathered on my husband's ancestry.

Duncan, This Scottish Clan is descended from the earls of Athol and took their name from the chief Donnachadh Reamhar "Fat Duncan", who led the Clan at the battle of Bannockburn. They possesed lands in Forfarshire. Sir William Duncan was created a Baronet by George III in 1764, but the title became extinct on his death in 1774. Adam son of Alexander, Duncan became commander of the fleet in the north sea and Admiral of the Blue. One of his great victories was gained at Camperdown and for his services he was created Viscount Duncan of Camperdown by George IV in 1800.

maggiemahone1

Posted by: Merewyn 03-Mar-2005, 03:09 PM
Clan Gunn

I was adopted at 2 mos. of age, and my name then was Pamela Robison.

Years ago when I was searching for my biological family, an amateur genealogist sent me an entire booklet full of information on the Robisons. It's one of my prize possessions.


Posted by: Monarch's Own 07-Mar-2005, 06:48 PM
Contacted Clan MacBean and got confirmed that my husband is affiliated with this clan since he is of direct descend of John Bean of Exeter, New Hampshire.

Here is an excerpt what Clan MacBean wrote to me:

We keep records of all Beans and as many of their septs as we can get.
It just happens that our largest database is the John Bean of Exeter line.
That line was merged with and became a part of Clan MacBean a number of years ago.
They use to be the John Bean of Exeter family line and had their own database and information.
Bernie MacBean got them to merge with his newly formed Clan MacBean and they became our largest family line.
A lot of the information in New England was not destroyed during the Civil War, so his line is much easier to track than some of the others. He arrived in the new world about 1652 after being captured in a battle with Cromwell in about 1651.
Would love any update you can send us on your family line. We sometimes lose the females as it was hard to keep track of them, but I am trying to add as many as we can. All descendants are important to us.
Let me know if I can help you any more.


Now I am working on the Anderson affiliation for my husband as well.

Wish me luck that one day I get my husband to wear his kilt. LOL


Posted by: CelticRose 08-Mar-2005, 06:10 PM
What exciting news for you, Monarch!

I went to the Highland games two weekends ago and looked into one of my great-grandmothers who was a Taylor. That would be part of the Cameron clan. I am not sure if that means sept or not. I can't remember!

Still confused what a sept versus clan means. Anybody want to explain that to me? unsure.gif

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 08-Mar-2005, 06:52 PM
According to the Court of the Lord Lyon, which is the official Scottish authority in clan matters:
http://www.lyon-court.com/lordlyon/ll_baseTemplate.jsp?pContentID=217&p_applic=CCC&pMenuID=182&p_service=Content.show&.
QUOTE
The best definition of a clan provided by a heraldic authority is contained in Nisbet's "System of Heraldry", published in 1722: ?A social group consisting of an aggregate of distinct erected families actually descended, or accepting themselves as descendants of a common ancestor, and which has been received by the Sovereign through its Supreme Officer of Honour, the Lord Lyon, as an honourable community whereof all of the members on establishing right to, or receiving fresh grants of, personal hereditary nobility will be awarded arms as determinate or indeterminate cadets both as may be of the chief family of the clan.?

Further:
QUOTE
A clan or family. which has a recognised chief or head confers noble status on the clan or family which gives it a legally recognised status and a corporate identity. A family or name group which has no recognised chief has no official position under the law of Scotland.

A sept is essentially a small clan that owes allegiance to a larger clan.

Posted by: CelticRose 09-Mar-2005, 05:07 PM
Okay, thanks Mailagnus. Now. Since my great-grandmother's name is Taylor which is under the clan name of Cameron. Does that make Taylor a "sept" of the clan of Cameron or part of the clan Cameron? I don't know how to explain my question.........sorry!

I also have a great-grandmother who was a McArthur whose family was from Scotland. How would I find out what clan McArthur might be? I forgot how to do all this! huh.gif Any good sites out there?

Thanks!

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 10-Mar-2005, 07:30 AM
CelticRose,
http://www.electricscotland.com/ is always a good starting point for research on particular clans and families.
As I understand it, septs are branches of clans. During the days when the highland system was still in effect, a sept could become large enough and control enough land to become a clan in its own right.
As a member of a branch of a clan, a member of the sept would owe allegiance to the clan chief, and would have the same rights and responsibilities as any other member of the clan.
One page that indexes the current status of various clans is http://www.familycrests.ca/products/heritage/scot.html.

Posted by: TheCarolinaScotsman 10-Mar-2005, 12:09 PM
QUOTE (Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas @ 10-Mar-2005, 08:30 AM)
As I understand it, septs are branches of clans. During the days when the highland system was still in effect, a sept could become large enough and control enough land to become a clan in its own right.
As a member of a branch of a clan, a member of the sept would owe allegiance to the clan chief, and would have the same rights and responsibilities as any other member of the clan.

A clan branch was just one group of the main family, i.e. Bighouse Mackays, Scourie Mackays, Strathnaver Mackays, Aberach Mackays, etc. A sept was a smaller family grouping, not of the main family, that lived in the main familiy's territotory and swore alliegence to it, i.e. (septs of Mackay) Bain, Rose, Williamson, etc. Since these smaller families could live in many places, many times the same family name might be a sept of several different clans so that you would need to know where the person came from to know which clan he was a sept of.

Posted by: CelticRose 10-Mar-2005, 05:50 PM
Hey! Thanks so much guys! That explains a lot. I had totally forgotten about Electric Scotland! doh! I probably even have it on my favorites list too! rolleyes.gif Thanks for the other site too, Mailagnus!

Posted by: Celeste 17-May-2005, 07:53 AM
Well my surname is Lowrey. We added the "E" when my great-great-great-great grandfather left Scotland with his Irish bride.

My clan affiliation is Gordon. Heres a little history.

The Clan Gordon


Arms: Quarterly, 1st, Azure, three boars' heads couped Or, armed Proper langued Gules (Gordon); 2nd, Or, three lion's heads erased Gules langued Azure (Lordship of Bedenoch); 3rd, Or, three crescents within a Royal Tressure Gules (seton); 4th, Azure, three fraises Argent (Fraser)

Badge: Out of crest coronet a stag's head (affrontée) Proper attired with 10 tines Or.

Branches: Gordon of Haddo, Gordon of Lochinvar, Gordon of Strathbogie

Tartan: Gordon, Gordon (red), Gordon (dress), Gordon (old, triple stripe)

Mottos: Bydand (Abiding), Animo non atitia (By courage not cunning)

Slogan: A Gordon! A Gordon!

Gaelic Name: Gôrdon


The name Gordon comes from the parish of Gordon in Berwickshire and Sir Adam of Gordon was granted Strathbogie, confiscated from the Earl of Atholl, in Aberdeenshire by Robert the Bruce in return for service to Bruce's cause, including being one of the ambassador's to Rome who fought to have the Bruce's excommunication removed. The Gordon's weilded enormous power during the 16th and 17th centuries, so much so that their chief was known as "the Cock of the North".

The castle of Strathbogie was renamed Huntly after a part of the Gordon lands in the Borders. In 1436 Alexander Gordon was named Lord Gordon and his son was given the title of Earl of Huntly.

During the fighting between the Douglases and the King, the Gordon's sided with the Royals. Their lands were then raised and the castle of Huntly burned when the Gordons moved south to aid the King. However, once the power of the Douglases was broken the Gordons grew unchallenged.

The fourth Duke of Gordon raised, at his own expense, his own regiment known as the Gordon Highlanders for whom the yellow stripe was introduced into the Black watch tartan. He was also Chancellor of Scotland in 1547 and was a close friend of Mary of Guise Mary Queen of Scots mother.

During the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite rebellions the Gordon's fought on both sides. The second Duke of Gordon followed the "Old Pretender" at Sheriffmuir but the third Duke fought for the Hanoverians against Prince Charlie at Culloden. The Dukes brother, Lord Louis Gordon, did raise two battalions of Gordons to fight for the Prince. He died in France in 1754.

The mother of the famous poet Lord Byron was Catherine Gordon of Gight, who inherited Gight Castle and its lands, only to have to sell them in 1787 to pay off the gambling debts of her husband.

Posted by: HighGravityBrewer 24-Jun-2005, 02:57 PM
QUOTE (Celeste @ 17-May-2005, 09:53 AM)
Well my surname is Lowrey. We added the "E" when my great-great-great-great grandfather left Scotland with his Irish bride.

My clan affiliation is Gordon. Heres a little history.

The Clan Gordon


Arms: Quarterly, 1st, Azure, three boars' heads couped Or, armed Proper langued Gules (Gordon); 2nd, Or, three lion's heads erased Gules langued Azure (Lordship of Bedenoch); 3rd, Or, three crescents within a Royal Tressure Gules (seton); 4th, Azure, three fraises Argent (Fraser)

Badge: Out of crest coronet a stag's head (affrontée) Proper attired with 10 tines Or.

Branches: Gordon of Haddo, Gordon of Lochinvar, Gordon of Strathbogie

Tartan: Gordon, Gordon (red), Gordon (dress), Gordon (old, triple stripe)

Mottos: Bydand (Abiding), Animo non atitia (By courage not cunning)

Slogan: A Gordon! A Gordon!

Gaelic Name: Gôrdon


The name Gordon comes from the parish of Gordon in Berwickshire and Sir Adam of Gordon was granted Strathbogie, confiscated from the Earl of Atholl, in Aberdeenshire by Robert the Bruce in return for service to Bruce's cause, including being one of the ambassador's to Rome who fought to have the Bruce's excommunication removed. The Gordon's weilded enormous power during the 16th and 17th centuries, so much so that their chief was known as "the Cock of the North".

The castle of Strathbogie was renamed Huntly after a part of the Gordon lands in the Borders. In 1436 Alexander Gordon was named Lord Gordon and his son was given the title of Earl of Huntly.

During the fighting between the Douglases and the King, the Gordon's sided with the Royals. Their lands were then raised and the castle of Huntly burned when the Gordons moved south to aid the King. However, once the power of the Douglases was broken the Gordons grew unchallenged.

The fourth Duke of Gordon raised, at his own expense, his own regiment known as the Gordon Highlanders for whom the yellow stripe was introduced into the Black watch tartan. He was also Chancellor of Scotland in 1547 and was a close friend of Mary of Guise Mary Queen of Scots mother.

During the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite rebellions the Gordon's fought on both sides. The second Duke of Gordon followed the "Old Pretender" at Sheriffmuir but the third Duke fought for the Hanoverians against Prince Charlie at Culloden. The Dukes brother, Lord Louis Gordon, did raise two battalions of Gordons to fight for the Prince. He died in France in 1754.

The mother of the famous poet Lord Byron was Catherine Gordon of Gight, who inherited Gight Castle and its lands, only to have to sell them in 1787 to pay off the gambling debts of her husband.

I am wondering if my Lowry surname is Gordan or MacLaren? I have found a lot of websites that say either. Any help in this or some knowledge on the subject as to why there would be two calns with the same surname would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks, John William Lowry, Jr.

Posted by: subhuman 31-Oct-2005, 10:58 AM
While discussion of Electric Scotland has come up, I also have to second them for Scottish Clan/Namegroup history.
For all those many peope who have posted something along the lines of not knowing if they belong to a certain clan, don't worry about it. If you bought the wrong tartan for your kilt- it really doesn't matter most times. As far as accuracy in tracing your family's history it may matter- but here's an excerpt from 2001 covering how Lord Lyon, and therefore in this area, Scottish Law views the topic:
QUOTE
It should first be recognised that a clan or family is a legally recognised group in Scotland, which has a corporate identity in the same way that a company, club or partnership has a corporate identity in law. A clan or family is a ''noble incorporation" because it has an officially recognised chief or head who being a nobleman of Scotland confers his noble status on the clan or family, thus making it a legally and statutorily recognised noble corporation often called "the Honourable Clan?" A name group, which does not have a chief, has no official position in the law of Scotland


QUOTE
All persons who bear the chief's surname are deemed to be members of his clan. Equally, it is generally accepted that someone who determines to offer their allegiance to the chief shall be recognised as a member of that clan unless the chief has decreed that he will not accept such a person's allegiance, Thus, if a person offers his allegiance to a particular chief by joining his clan society or by wearing his tartan, he can be deemed to have elected to join that particular clan and should be viewed as a member of that clan unless the chief particularly states that he or his name group are not to be allowed to join the clan.


Unless you, or your particular surname, are specificly excluded from the clan you are considered legally a member of the clan. If your name is found associated with more than one clan and you cannot narrow down your family's exact origins, it really doesn't matter. Pick one, even if you're not sure just go with the clan you feel you have the strongest ties to and wear the tartan with pride! Most clan societies will accept you even with tenuous ties, although they usually want to see a little more than just the color of your kilt.

Posted by: subhuman 31-Oct-2005, 11:08 AM
Whoops! I forgot to provide the link to the entire article I quoted above!
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/clans_families_septs.htm
While we're at it, a link to an explanation of Clanship: http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/kin.htm

Posted by: subhuman 31-Oct-2005, 01:02 PM
After reading what others have posted, I have to say that I have it easy in some regards. My Scottish surname is only found in one place, so there's no real confusion as to the origins. My family also kept fairly accurate records over the last two and a half centuries, the time spent in the US and Canada. Go ahead, search around- you'll only find the name Keith in one place, and luckily it's easy enough to trace the Keith name back to what is now called clan Keith. smile.gif
From here until I state otherwise I'm not cliaiming to be a direct descendant.
The name Keith is believed to be Norman in origin, as are many Scots. The oldest surviving record of the name Keith dates to the reign of David I. A Baron named Hervelus witnessed the charter where Robert deBrus (no, not THAT famous one) was granted Annandale. Shortly afterwards Hervelus was named Keith Hervei and appointed the office of Keith Marischal. The year for this would have been approximately between 1100 and 1120. From this time until 1715 it's hard to find a part of Scottish history that does not mention the Keiths, who held the title of Marischal in various forms until 1715. Whether it be Robert de Keith's involvement in the government after the death of Wallace, fighting in the wars of Independance under the standard of Bruce at the Battle of Inverury, leading the cavalry charge at Bannockburn that broke the English archers- the list goes on in this era. For services in the War for Indepandance, lands were granted in Aberdeen. He continued to perform services for Robert the Bruce, being one of the signers of the Declaration of Abroath in 1320, appointed to negotiate for peace with England in 1323, and aftert the Bruce's death he was one of the knights who carried the Bruce's heart to the holy lands.
The Keiths came into possession of land around Stonehaven, and the remains of the only castle built by the Keiths, Dunnottar, is located here. There's an interesting bit of history surrounding this wehre the Keiths were excommunicated from the Church for this, but it was later reversed by a Papal Bull in 1394. The high point of the history of Dunnottar came in 1651 while Cromwell's armies were running rampant through Scotland. Having been raised to the peerage in 1458 with the title of Earl Marischal, one of the responsibilities of the Keiths was the protection of the Honours of Scotland (the sword, sceptre and crown of state) as well as conveying them and presenting them at coronations. In 1651, Donnottar was the last castle in Scotland still flying the Scottish flag, and it was where the Honours of Scotland were located. Cromwell's army laid seige- with most reports stating that Dunnottar had a garrison of only 70 men. These men held out for eight months against an army that had in a period of two years swept through Ireland and Scotland. Dunnottar was surrendered, only to have the English discover that their seige had been unsuccessful- the Honours of Scotland as well as a number of Charles II's personal papers had been removed from the castle.
Here are a few links to pictures of Dunnottar- it becomes pretty obvious why it managed to hold out against a siege. If it hadn't been for cannon, Dunnottar could have been held against an army while defended by a few grannies with broomsticks!
http://www.darkisle.com/d/dunnottar/dunnottar1.html
http://www.castles.org/Chatelaine/dunnottar/
This one has a few interior shots, including the main hall and various defenses:
http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/stonehaven/dunnottarcastle/
Finally, this one which gives you abetter view of the sheer 150' cliff walls:
http://www.electricscotland.com/pictures/set6.htm
Aftier the forfeiture of Keith lands and Titles, Dunnottar was partially dismantled twice during the early 1700's. Unfortunately not much remains today.
The title of Earl Marischal was the third-highest Office of the Crown in Scotland, and was only held by Keiths. After their support of Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1715, all lands and titles were forfeit- and the office has never been filled since.
http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/earldoms/index.htm
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Earl+Marischal
A Keith, the fifth Earl Marischal, founded Marischal College in Aberdeen. It remains the second-largest granite structure in the world, and was founded as a protestant alternative to the Catholic King's College int he same city. In the 1800's they were merged by an act of Parlaiment, and are now known collectively as Aberdeen University. http://www.abdn.ac.uk/central/vcampus/marischal/marischal.shtml
Surviving to this day is a banner carried by a Keith during the Battle of Flodden Field, 1535 bearing what is now adopted as the clan motto- Veritis Vincit, or Truth Conquers.
At this link, under the heading "Field Marshall Keith," is a brief history of one of th Keiths after being expelled from Scotland. http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/oct/14.htm He may hold the distinction of being one of the few people who has a statue in both Scotland (Peterhead) and in Germany (Berlin).
As for the history that I can actually trace back to my immediate family- we came to Nova Scotia by way of Dublin in 1715. I suspect but cannot prove strong ties to the titled Keiths due to the year- that was the same time that Keith lands and Titles were forfieted. However, there's a rather mundane history from that point on, probably the most exciting part being my grandparents eloping to Maine which is how part of the immediiate family came to be in the US. Of being a descendant of a relative the famous Keiths- there's little doubt, the timeline fits too well. However it's likely to have been a distant relative.
Two other branches of the family have been traced back to the early 1700's as well, one German and the other of Welsh or (shudder!) English origin.

Posted by: CelticRose 18-Nov-2005, 09:23 PM
Hey subhuman! Lucky you can trace your family! Cool! thumbs_up.gif I have many great-grandmothers with supposed Scottish surnames I have Taylor, Walker, Suit. Alison, McArthur and Blackstock. Taylor is a sept of Cameron. Allison would be MacFarlane and McArthur is debateable! All in all I am a Heinz 57 American since I have Italian, English and Scots-Irish ancestry. rolleyes.gif


Posted by: MiLadyCeilidh 23-Dec-2005, 01:30 PM
Clan Leslie here!
Also GORDON ... GRANT ... MACINTOSH ... BRUCE ... CAMERON ... CARNEGIE ... BELL... FORBES ... TAYLOR ... BENNET ... ROSS ... MACDOUGAL ... MACGREGOR ... MACDUFF ... JAMES ... LAMONT ...ROBERTSON ... I'm a heinz 57 of Scots

Posted by: BlackIrishman 10-Jan-2006, 03:51 PM
I haven't done much research, so I was wondering if anyone readily knew anything about the McCartney clan?

What I've gathered so far is that the progenitor of this clan was King Cormac McArt. Perhaps I should do a google search.


Posted by: Keltic 10-Jan-2006, 10:36 PM
QUOTE (subhuman @ 31-Oct-2005, 03:02 PM)
After reading what others have posted, I have to say that I have it easy in some regards.  My Scottish surname is only found in one place, so there's no real confusion as to the origins.  My family also kept fairly accurate records over the last two and a half centuries, the time spent in the US and Canada.  Go ahead, search around- you'll only find the name Keith in one place, and luckily it's easy enough to trace the Keith name back to what is now called clan Keith. smile.gif
From here until I state otherwise I'm not cliaiming to be a direct descendant.....
.....been traced back to the early 1700's as well, one German and the other of Welsh or (shudder!) English origin.

I'm kind of disappointed that in sharing the family history, you neglect to mention the most important and historic chapters in the Keith clan history....

beer_mug.gif http://www.keiths.ca/ beer_mug.gif



Posted by: fedelmia 07-Feb-2006, 01:03 AM
[COLOR=BlueViolet]Just wanted to let you all know there's another Cameron in your midst! My gr-granpa Cameron came to Canada waay back when and eventually migrated over to Idaho where he met my gr-granma to be. I never knew my gr-granfather but I knew my gr-granma. She was a kind woman and sharp as a whip, even at an old age. Guess she had to be to put up with gr-granpa's fiery temper!
Some years later, when I was a teen, my family and I were able to go to Scotland and visit our cousins still left from my gr-granpa's family. He had many brothers and sisters. We stayed with his two youngest sisters who were very old. They lived in Keith! I know that one of my gr-auntie's had one leg shorter than the other and she was known as "Limping Lily". It was exciting to see the farm where they all lived at one time.
Since I've grown older and have learned more of my family heritage, the Camerons were supportive of Bonnie Prince Charlie. When I was small I used to be very romantic minded and would day dream about this bonnie prince. I always felt sorry for him and imagined that I would help him if I were alive in his day. Now I know where I get those strong feelings from!
tongue.gif
~fedelmia

Posted by: Rindy 15-Feb-2006, 07:17 PM
Welcome to you fedelmia. I hope you enjoy the music here as well as the forum. Thats a very interesting story thank you for sharing that..

Slainte smile.gif

Posted by: TandVh 24-Jun-2007, 12:28 PM
I'm going to add Clan Henderson to the fray. It's a little too early in my newfound Heritage obsession for me to have done much research about my personal family line- I am proud of what I have dig up about Henderson or "MacEaunrig" in Gaidhlig.
I plan on participating in the DNA project on the Clan Henderson Society of America and Canada site- hopefully there's been enough of us involved to find some matches.

Posted by: sisterknight 25-Jun-2007, 07:36 AM
QUOTE (High Plains Drifter @ 16-Dec-2003, 11:32 PM)
My Scottish roots are Clan Campbell of Cawdor and my family lived near Cawdor Castle and Nairn in the 17th Century and before. I hope to go visit the area in a few years, not so much for genealogy purposes but to visit the distilleries nearby. tongue.gif

hoy cuz!!!!clan Campbell here as well...but not sure which branch still digging...also clan McGregor....yes, don't ask me how the two got together...big blood fued and all....

Posted by: Shepherdess 24-Jul-2007, 12:36 AM
I'm coming late to this party. After availing myself of the resources referenced here, I'm astonished to find that my maiden name Riddle is actually a clan name - albeit a teeny tiny one, though quite old apparently. It's a "district" tartan, though? Red Roxborough. Which is really ironic since the town closest to me now here in North Carolina is Roxboro.

Also, if I went by regional association, the area where my grandparents actually grew up (Motherwell), I'm affiliated with the clan of an overseas friend - Dalziel. He's got a purty tartan!

Which would be more "kosher" so to speak, for an affiliation? Both ties seem rather loose.

My mother's side gives me McLellan, McMullen, and Morrison but that all gets somewhat messy as I'm not sure where the actual bloodlines go - there's some Asher mixed in and I'm not even sure what nationality that is - it's not Scottish! wink.gif

My paternal grandfather is Mexican, but of direct French descent. My mom's maiden name is Moreno-Canard, lol.

Posted by: stitchinthiz 24-Sep-2007, 11:07 PM
I'm a MacDuff and Lamont on my Mother's side of the family -- Campbell on my Father's side.
I'm married to a MacGregor (Father) and MacNeill of Barra (Mother).

Still working on all of the Clan Histories for the family.

Posted by: Danu9 04-Nov-2007, 01:29 PM
Haven't looked through all of the posts yet (just the first page & last one). So, I have no idea as yet if any others posted from my clan .... MacLeod of Skye beer_mug.gif

Posted by: Fionna Machumhail 13-Nov-2007, 11:48 AM
Same here as far as coming in kinda late...

Surname McCool. My ancestors began trickling to America from Co. Londonderry , NI, in the early 1700's. The trail stops in NI around 1695-ish. There are still some relatives there, not far from the old home place.

Knowing that my father, uncles and other McCool kin, called themselves "Scotch-Irish", and knowing that those old pioneers were Quakers - it appears they were likely descended from planted Scots. They owned their own home (it still stands by the way!) and a large parcel of land in NI. My cousin there, always feeling the McCools/McCooles were inherently Irish, chewed on that a bit, then came to the conclusion that the Scottish connection is most probably right. We just haven't found the documentation, if there's any to be found at all.

As for clan connections? I really don't know. I've found a varied mix of information both from Ireland and Scotland and NONE match up.

On the Scottish side, there seems to be an association to the McDonalds and McDougals. Then, there's clans McColl, and McCoul. ?? On the Irish side...a good number of McCools but...that info is also wishy washy.

Maybe we were just SOOOO UNIQUE (most likely hard headed *heheheh*) that we just couldn't be bothered. rolleyes.gif On the other hand, maybe we were "R U N N O F T". laugh.gif

On a positive note, we do share the name with that legendary hero, Finn McCool. *hence my forum name*. rolleyes.gif

If anyone knows anything about the McCool/McCoole/MacCool bunch, I'd love to compare notes.

PS: Hi Rindy! wink.gif






Posted by: Druid_of_Ark 10-Dec-2007, 10:49 AM
My fathers mother was Ola Mae Cathcart, so that was an easy one. My mothers Mother was Fleta LaVera Legg and as it turns out the Legg family is a Sept of the Bruce Clan. Though my loyalties are with the Cathcart Clan I am not opposed to being of a sept of the Bruce, though I do not wear anything of the Bruce Clan instead I am studyign all I can about Cathcart and that proud lineage. I am also a staunch supporter of Saor Alba, which is a group desiring Freedom for Scotland. I am pro-Scottish and proud of the heritage I have for the Cathcarts have been involved with many treaties and such since the 11th century,

Posted by: tadams1138 14-Aug-2014, 06:23 PM
A little late to the conversation (10 years), but regarding Ceciliastar1's comment, Adams is a red hearing. It is based on our Polish name from our grandfather's side which was something like Adamczyk. What I heard is it got changed at Ellis Island to Adams. So... Adams is a dead end. Brady is our Welsh/Irish connection.

Posted by: MacGlasrich 11-Feb-2015, 04:19 PM
A quick correction to the website info. The MacGlasrich (MacGlasserich) Campbells are a sept of the MacDonells of Keppoch, not Glengarry. We have never been part of Clan Campbell, which only emerged after our "departure" from Argyll. The Macdonalds, historically, have never been as hostile to Clan Campbell as we have, although we were happy enough to do a bodyguarding job when the Duke of Argyll's daughter, Primrose Campbell, had to travel to Beauly to marry Simon (the Fox) Lord Lovat in 1733.

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