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Sekhmet Posted on: 16-Oct-2019, 11:47 AM

Replies: 6
Views: 1,300
Love and strength to her family.
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #317399

Sekhmet Posted on: 14-Dec-2018, 09:00 AM

Replies: 49
Views: 14,979
I'm pretty sure this is the recipe my mother used at Thanksgiving. It wasn't bad, as far as custard pies go. I happen to like them, but I'm in the minority in my family. If anything I think I would've seen if I could get away with a slightly deeper pie dish.
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #317063

Sekhmet Posted on: 11-Nov-2018, 11:26 AM

Replies: 22
Views: 5,716
Not all that far from me, either. smile.gif I'm a bit west though. I'll be in Gettysburg next weekend.
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #317013

Sekhmet Posted on: 22-Jan-2018, 08:50 AM

Replies: 4
Views: 888
Welcome! I'm so glad you enjoy the music here. <3
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #316476

Sekhmet Posted on: 18-Jan-2018, 09:18 AM

Replies: 17
Views: 1,680
Hey, I remember you! biggrin.gif Welcome back to the scene of the crim....er, the fold!
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #316460

Sekhmet Posted on: 17-Jan-2018, 04:33 PM

Replies: 16
Views: 3,327
*eight years later...*

This is actually one of my standards for meat pies, at least at home. I'll make one or two of these for events, but not necessarily "immersion" ones where people are looking for documentation. I've even made a batch of the filling and done these in pasty crusts so they're portable. Then again I've gone on a pasty kick for the last several years. The kids actually inhale this readily - but then again with only a couple of instances they've really liked meat pies in general. This also makes a fabulous base for Scotch Eggs. Just sayin'.
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #316458

Sekhmet Posted on: 17-Jan-2018, 04:23 PM

Replies: 5
Views: 739
Welcome dear!
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #316457

Sekhmet Posted on: 11-Dec-2017, 10:46 AM

Replies: 49
Views: 14,979
*bump* C'mon kids, time to make the goodies!
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #316371

Sekhmet Posted on: 24-Oct-2017, 10:45 AM

Replies: 8
Views: 2,242
Oh fine, take all the mystery out of it. Though I keep threatening to start learning how to process meats...
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #316266

Sekhmet Posted on: 13-Oct-2017, 08:50 AM

Replies: 8
Views: 2,242
All I've ever had is red, and I am a fan. It may also be because of the Belgian beer my girlfriend cooks hers with. I'll have to experiment and tell you later. wink.gif
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #316234

Sekhmet Posted on: 14-Sep-2017, 08:36 AM

Replies: 0
Views: 261
If you've ever spent any time in the SCA, you might know what sekanjabin is. Long story short it is a summer drink that has its roots in at least the 15th century, and it still served today. I include a redacted ancient recipe for fun.

From Duke Sir Cariadoc of the Bow's Miscellany:

Sekanjabin

Dissolve 4 cups sugar in 2 1/2 cups of water; when it comes to a boil add 1 cup wine vinegar. Simmer 1/2 hour. Add a handful of mint, remove from fire, let cool. Dilute the resulting syrup to taste with ice water (5 to 10 parts water to 1 part syrup). The syrup stores without refrigeration.

Note: This is the only recipe in the Miscelleny that is based on a modern source: A Book of Middle Eastern Food, by Claudia Roden. Sekanjabin is a period drink; it is mentioned in the Fihrist of al-Nadim, which was written in the tenth century. The only period recipe I have found for it (in the Andalusian cookbook) is called "Sekanjabin Simple" and omits the mint. It is one of a large variety of similar drinks described in that cookbook-flavored syrups intended to be diluted in either hot or cold water before drinking.


Syrup of Simple Sikanjabn

(Oxymel)
Andalusian p. A-74

Take a ratl of strong vinegar and mix it with two ratls of sugar, and cook all this until it takes the form of a syrup. Drink an qiya of this with three of hot water when fasting: it is beneficial for fevers of jaundice, and calms jaundice and cuts the thirst, since sikanjabn syrup is beneficial in phlegmatic fevers: make it with six qiyas of sour vinegar for a ratl of honey and it is admirable.

This seems to be at least two different recipes, for two different medical uses. The first, at least, is intended to be drunk hot. In modern Iranian restaurants, sekanjabin is normally served cold, often with grated cucumber.


Now, being a veteran of making this syrup by the gallon for fun and profit (I work in my Laurel's Bakery, pray for me ), I can give a few notes and tips for making this.

Some like it sweet, in which case cut back somewhat on the vinegar. You will not ruin the batch by doing so. Promise.

You can use whatever sweetener you desire, but understand that anything other than sugar and honey will not produce a syrup and will not have a shelf life.

Any mint can be used. Peppermint, spearmint, flavored mints (orange, chocolate, pineapple, etc), lemon balm, catnip, etc. You can certainly experiment with blends to see what you like best.

If you want a stronger syrup, place the vinegar in the dry mint and let it macerate for a while before adding both to the hot water.

You can probably get a second round of syrup out of your batch of mint. Simply skim or strain it back out, reset the vinegar, and proceed.

Enjoy! I make the syrup by the gallon because it is wonderful to drink. Try it!

  Forum: Drinks  ·  Post Preview: #316146

Sekhmet Posted on: 10-Sep-2017, 07:34 AM

Replies: 132
Views: 23,807
I need things to cook. It just got bloody chilly out there!
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #316123

Sekhmet Posted on: 28-Feb-2017, 08:37 PM

Replies: 10
Views: 1,725
And I'm back! Bwahahaha!
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #315732

Sekhmet Posted on: 14-Sep-2013, 09:45 AM

Replies: 132
Views: 23,807
Ginger Cakes Williamsburg Style

Ingredients:
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons ginger
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup butter, melted
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 cup unsulfered molasses
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon lemon extract
4+ cups of flour


Directions:
In a bowl cream everything together but the flour. Add one cup of flour at a time making sure it is well mixed. When you get to the 4th cup the batter should be like moist clay. You do not want it at all runny. If it's runny you will have ginger snaps. You should be able to make a shape and have it hold it's shape. It seriously should be like modeling clay. Continue to add flour a little at a time until you get clay type dough. Then make small balls of dough and press then onto a cookie sheet. Let them remain dome shaped.
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #309255

Sekhmet Posted on: 26-Jun-2013, 10:47 AM

Replies: 9
Views: 1,490
Actually, I've been threatening to get a spurtle for a while now. I used one at an event a couple of years ago and it worked very well. Easy on the hands too. Besides, it stumps people in no time flat.
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #308873

Sekhmet Posted on: 07-Jun-2013, 08:01 PM

Replies: 52
Views: 63,833
I'm around here somewhere. This is still the best Celtic collection out there, Pandora makes me want to throw something.

So yeah. I'm on FB fairly regularly, that's your best bet in getting hold of me. PM me if you want a friend request thrown your way. biggrin.gif
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #308700

Sekhmet Posted on: 16-May-2013, 03:09 PM

Replies: 52
Views: 63,833
Well, look who the cat dragged in...
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #308558

Sekhmet Posted on: 22-Aug-2010, 02:31 PM

Replies: 132
Views: 23,807
Sweet Potato Soup with Corn & Chilis

3T corn oil
1 small yellow onion. minced
1 jalapeno pepper, minced
1 - 1.5 pounds sweet potato, peeled & cubed
4 cups chicken stock
2 cups water
1 cup fresh or frozen corn
pinch nutmeg
salt & pepper to taste
1/4 to 1/2 cup light cream

1. In a pot or large saucepan, heat oil over medium-high heat Add onion and cook till translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the jalapeno and cook another 1-2 minutes.

2. Add sweet potatoes, chicken stock, and water to the pot and bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until the sweet potatoes are tender, about 30-40 minutes.

3. In the bowl of a food processor or blender, puree the sweet potatoes in their cooking liquids (in batches till it's all done). Transfer the puree to a clean saucepan.

4. Add the corn, seasonings and cream to the puree. Reheat until soup just comes to a simmer. Serve immediately.

Source: New Native American Cooking by Dale Carson
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #299049

No New Posts Pinned: Music Suggestions (Pages 1 2 3 ...4 )
Sekhmet Posted on: 21-Aug-2010, 06:38 PM

Replies: 50
Views: 30,375
Wylde Nept! They're a band out of Iowa, but I've seen them a few times over the years. Great pub band, I've been a fan for a good while now.

http://www.wyldenept.com/
  Forum: Celtic Music  ·  Post Preview: #299044

Sekhmet Posted on: 19-Aug-2010, 01:09 PM

Replies: 16
Views: 3,327
Oh, I'm perfectly willing to assume that *this* recipe isn't period, but it comes from much older roots. Just a matter of finding them. biggrin.gif

But I tend to cook for myself while I've got the fire going in the hearth and bread oven, so...maybe if I stick it in the back...hm...
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #299010

Sekhmet Posted on: 19-Aug-2010, 01:06 PM

Replies: 132
Views: 23,807
Actually, you can serve turnips and red beets together. We put them in fairly thick slices (golden beets work like a champ too), lay them out on a baking sheet with a drizzle of olive oil and simple salt & pepper, bake until done all the way through.
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #299009

Sekhmet Posted on: 19-Aug-2010, 01:02 PM

Replies: 132
Views: 23,807
Yep, it's been a while. Got a job at a local museum and my father just recently passed, so it's been a while since I've even had the time to look at anything else.

Glad to hear the pumpkin recipe gets some mileage! We had a *ton* of pumpkins uncut left in one of our barns at the museum last fall, and I started cooking them down and stuffing them. Director thought I was nuts. LOL
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #299008

Sekhmet Posted on: 19-Aug-2010, 12:57 PM

Replies: 16
Views: 3,327
I've got a cooking demo coming up soon, wonder if I can sneak this in and hope nobody asks too many questions about authenticity and documentation...hm...
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #299006

Sekhmet Posted on: 19-Aug-2010, 11:42 AM

Replies: 132
Views: 23,807
*nudge* Tis the seaason sooner than we think!
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #299001

Sekhmet Posted on: 19-Aug-2010, 11:35 AM

Replies: 16
Views: 3,327
You realize I'm going to have to make this. Like, right now.
  Forum: From Your Kitchen to My Plate  ·  Post Preview: #299000

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