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> Learning Scots Gaelic, anybody want to try?
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DesertRose 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 04:33 PM
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I love the language of Scots Gaelic. When I listen to Runrig and Capercaillie singing in the language, I wish I could sing along! It is so beautiful to me. I thought maybe those of us who wanted to try to learn a few words and phrases could meet here and share. A couple of my favorite learning Gaelic websites are the following as they give pronunciation as well.

http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/ionnsachadh/bac/

http://www.scottishradiance.com/galsec.htm

I will start!

Feasgar Math
(good evening)

Is mise Rose
(I am Rose)

Ciamar a tha sibh
(how are you)

Tha mi gl mhath
(I am very good)

Moran taing
(Many thanks)

Anish slan a carag
(good bye, health)

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scottish2 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 06:57 PM
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I think before you start you should post a pronunciation guide if there is one on-line. I know some Japanese sounds are not the same as in English for instance the letter I is pronouced like the English letter E and the letter E is pronouced Eh so might be a good thing to post if there is one on-line so folks know how to properly pronounce the words.
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DesertRose 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 08:12 PM
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Hi Scottish 2. Thanks for your recommendations. I don't know if you had a chance to look over the websites that I provided above, but the reason why I like these two sites is because they do provide pronunciation guides with each word, phrase and lesson. Are you saying that maybe we should provide the pronunciation as we exchange back and forth with one another here? Maybe I should have done that with my first post. Didn't think of it at the time. wacko.gif

Tapadh leibh
(tahpuh leeve)
(thank you) smile.gif
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scottish2 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 08:16 PM
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No I haven't had chance as we've had guests over this evening but maybe copy and paste the guide here so it can be seen when the user first joins the discussion. smile.gif
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DesertRose 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 08:58 PM
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Hmm.... I haven't found a pronunciation guide on line....yet, except for what the sites above provide with each lesson. So what I did was cut and paste from one of them. And I will do a lesson a day. Hope this helps. smile.gif

Lesson I

ciamar a tha sibh? (formal)
how are you?

(kaymuhr uh ha shiv)


ciamar a tha thu? (informal)
how are you?

(kaymuhr uh ha oo)


Tha gu math

Fine

(Ha gu mah)


Gl mhath

Very well

(Glay vah)


Tapadh leibh (formal)
Thank you

(Tahpuh leeve)


Tapadh leat (informal)
Thank you

(Tahpuh leht)


Ciamar a tha sibh fin? (formal)
How are you yourself?

(Kaymuhr uh ha shiv fayn)


ciamar a tha thu fhin? (informal) B]

how are you yourself?

( kaymuhr uh ha oo hayn)


[B]Madainn mhath


Good morning

( Mahteen vah )



Feasgar math

Good afternoon or good evening

( Fayskuhr mah )


Tha i bragha
It's lovely

( ha ee breea-uh)



Tha i fliuch

It is wet

( Ha ee flewch)



Tha i fuar

It's cold

( Ha ee foouhr )


An-diugh

Today

( Uhn jooh )
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scottish2 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 09:21 PM
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http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/ionnsachadh/

Scottish Gaelic (Gidhlig)

Scottish Gaelic is spoken by about 60,000 people in Scotland (Alba), mainly in the Highlands (a' Ghaidhealtachd) and in the Western Isles (Na h-Eileanan an Iar), but also in Glasgow (Glaschu), Edinburgh (Dn Eideann) and Inverness (Inbhir Nis). There are also small Gaelic communities in Canada, particularly in Nova Scotia (Alba Nuadh) and on Cape Breton Island (Eilean Cheap Breatainn). Other speakers are found especially in Australia (Astrilia), New Zealand and the USA (Na Stitean Aonaichte).

Scottish Gaelic is closely related to Manx and Irish and was brought to Scotland around the 4th century AD by the Scots from Ireland. Scottish Gaelic was spoken throughout Scotland (apart from small areas in the extreme south-east and north-east) between the 9th and 11th centuries, but began to retreat north and westwards from the 11th century onwards. All Scottish Gaelic dialects are mutually intelligible, and written Irish can be understood to a large extent.

The earliest identifiably texts in Scottish Gaelic are notes in the Book of Deer written in north eastern Scotland in the 12th century, although the existence of a common written Classical Gaelic concealed the extent of the divergence between Scottish and Irish Gaelic.

The Scottish Gaelic alphabet

Scottish Gaelic is written with just 18 letters. The consonants all have more than one pronunciation depending on their position in a word and which vowels precede or follow them.

A a B b C c D d E e F f G g H h I i
L l M m N n O o P p R r S s T t U u

A grave accent on a vowel (, , , and ) indicates a longer version of the vowel, but these are not considered separate letters

The older Gaelic (uncial) script or "corr litir" has not been used for several centuries in Scotland, and has never been used in printed Gaelic. The uncial script is still used in Ireland on road signs and public notices.

The orthography of Scottish Gaelic was regularised in the late 1970s, the main impact of which was the abolition of the acute accent on "a", "e" and "o".

Pronunciation - vowels and diphthongs

user posted image

Pronunciation - connragan (consonants)
The connragan leathann or broad consonants are those preceded or followed by a, o or u. Connragan caola or slender consonants are those preceded or followed by i or e. Most consonants have different pronunciations depending on whether they appear at the beginning of a word or elsewhere.

The initial consonants of Gaelic words can change in various contexts. This process is known as "lenition" and involves the addition of an after the initial letter. The resulting letters are suathaich or fricatives

user posted image

Sample text

Tha gach uile dhuine air a bhreth saor agus co-ionnan ann an urram 's ann an cirichean. Tha iad air am breth le reusan is le cogais agus mar sin bu chir dhaibh a bhith be nam measg fhein ann an spiorad brthaireil.

Translation

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)
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scottish2 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 10:02 PM
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A Simple Guide to Gaelic
Introduction

Gaelic is the ancient, complex and subtle language of the Celts. This page gives a guide to the pronunciation and meaning of many of the place names that you will come across in your travels around Scotland and the rest of my site. The informathion was gathered from a couple of books (I do not speak Gaelic myself). It does not pretend to teach you how to speak Gaelic but may stop locals rolling about with laughter as you mangle names. As examples of the complexity of Gaelic, look at the definitive article ('the'). In the nominative case ('the hill'), it may be an, am or an t- (masculine); a', an or an t- (feminine); na or na h- (plural). In the genitive case ('of the hill'), it may be a', an, an t-; na, na h-; and nan, nam respectively. Nouns and adjectives also change spelling and pronunciation in the genitive:
·  buirich ('roaring' or 'bellowing') becomes Meall a'Bhuiridh - 'hill of roaring',
·  Coire Odhar Beag, 'the small dun-coloured hill' becomes Sron a'Choire Odhair-bhig, 'the spur of the small dun-coloured corrie'.

Add to this the confusion of the many attempts of the English to convert Gaelic into something they can pronounce and local usage of both spelling and pronunciation.

For books about Gaelic, have a look at:
Scottish Gaelic-English/English-Scottish Gaelic DictionaryColloquial Scottish Gaelic: The Complete Course for BeginnersGaelic-English/English-Gaelic Dictionary


Pronunciation

Generally stress in Gaelic falls on the first syllable of the word, eg. doras (dor'us) a door.


Vowels
óa long sound as in 'tone'
òa short sound as in 'job'
éas in 'say'
è as in 'get'
àas in 'car'
aas in 'cat' but also often sounds like 'uh', eg. aran (ar'un) bread
i as in 'with'
ìlong sound as in 'need'
uas in 'but'
ù long sound as in 'food'
Consonants
mh/bh/dbthese consonants are normally pronounced as an English 'v' sound, especially when at the end of a word, eg. làmh (lav) hand; gabh (gav) take
mhwhen this appears in the middle of a word, is often pronounced as an English 'w', eg. Samhain (Sa-oo-win)
dh like a muffled 'g', eg. dhomh (gove), as if you are breathing out at the same time
gh like a 'y' sound
fh normally silent
chas in 'loch' (a gutteral k)
cthis is always hard like a 'k'
dwhen followed by either 'e' or 'i' is pronounced almost like a 'j', eg. deich (jech) ten; dearg (jarrig) red
lwhen followed by either 'e' or 'i' is pronounced as in the word 'million', eg. leabhar (lyo-ur) a book
swhen followed by either 'e' or 'i' is pronounced as 'sh', eg. sìnnsear (shin-shur) ancestor
tfollowed by 'e' or 'i' is pronounced as in the word 'catch', eg. teth (cheh) hot; tìr (cheer) land, country

Place Names

The table below shows some of the place name components that are seen commonly on maps. Anglicised forms are shown in brackets ( ) where applicable.

Gaelic Meaning Example
ach, achadh (auch) fieldBeinn Achaladair - 'hill of the field of hard water '
alltburn, streamCrom Allt - a burn next to the village of Tyndrum
aonachridge or moorAonach Eagach - 'the notched ridge'
ard, aird height or promontory Cruach Ardrain - 'stack of the height or high part'
baile (bal or ball)hamlet, homesteadBalmaha on the West Highland Way
ban fair, whiteStob Ban - 'white peak'
beag (beg) little Aonach Beag - 'little hill'
bealachpass
beinn (ben)mountainBeinn Ime - 'butter mountain'
beithe birch
bidean pinnacleBidean nam Bian - 'pinnacle of the mountains'
binneanpeaked mountainBinnein Mor - 'big peaked mountain'
bo cow
breac (breck)speckled
buachailleherdsmanBuachaille Etive Mor - 'the great herdsman of Etive'
buidheyellow
buirichroaring or bellowing
cailleachnun, old woman
caistealcastleAn Caisteal - 'the castle'
caol, caolas (kyle)narrow, strait, firth, kyle
caorannrowan tree
carnheap of stones (cairn), round rocky hillStob Coire a'Chairn - 'peak of the coire of the cairn'
carraigrock
ceann (kin)head, headlandKinlochleven - a town at the head of Loch Leven
clachstone
clachanhamlet
cnaphillock
coillewood, forest
coinneachmossCone Hill - corrupted form of coinneach from the surrounding moors
coire (corrie)a round hollow in the mountainside, cirque, sea-gulf, whirlpoolCoire Bà - viewed as the West Highland Way crosses Rannoch Moor
creag (craig)crag, rock, cliffBeinn Dubhchraig - 'black-rock hill'
cromcrookedCrom Allt - a burn next to the village of Tyndrum
cruachheap, stack, bold hill Cruach Ardrain - 'stack of the height or high part'
cuilnook, recess
culback, hill-back
damhox, stag
darachoak
deargredCarn Mor Dearg - 'red peak'
dobhran (dorain)otter
doire (derry)groveDerrydaroch - 'the oak grove' (a farm in Glen Falloch at the head of Loch Lomond)
druim (drum)the back, a ridgeTyndrum - 'the house of the ridge'
dubhblackBeinn Dubhchraig - 'black-rock hill'
dun (dum)fortress, castle, heap, mound
eachhorse
eagnotch
easwaterfall
eileanisland
eunbird
fadalong
fionnwhite, holy
fitheachraven
fuaranwell, spring
gabhargoatStob Ghabhar - 'goat peak'
garbhroughStob Garbh - 'rough hill'
gealwhite
giubhasfir
glasgrey, greenBeinglass Falls at the head of Loch Lomond
gleannnarrow valley, glen
gormgreen, blueCairn Gorm - 'blue hill'
guala, gualainnshoulder of a hill
imebutterBeinn Ime - 'butter mountain'
inbhir (inver)confluence
inisan island or a meadow by a river or a resting place for cattle
iolaireagle
iubharyewSgor an Iubhair - 'peak of the yew'
laganlittle hollow
lariga pass
laoigh (lui)calf Ben Lui - 'calf hill'
leac (leck)flat stone, slab
leacachstony slope
leathadslope, brae
leitir (letter)slope, side of a hill
loch, lochanlake, small lakeLoch Lomond - Scotland's largest lake
mamlarge, round or gently rising hill; a passMam Carraigh - a ridge travelled across between Bridge of Orchy and Inveroran on the West Highland Way
maolbare topMaol Chinn-dearg - 'bald red hill'
mhanach monkBeinn Mhanach - 'monk hill'
mheadhoin (vane)middleBeinn Mheadhoin - 'middle hill'
mealla round hillMeall Dearg - 'red hill'
mor large, greatBen More - 'big hill'
muileannmill
mullachtop, summitMullach nan Coirean - 'summit of the coires'
nead (nid)nest
nevisvenomous or stormyBen Nevis - 'venomous or stormy mountain'
odhar (our)dun-colouredStob a'Choire Odhair - 'peak of the dun-coloured corrie'
righkingDalrigh - 'the king's field', the site of one of Robert the Bruce's lost battles near Tyndrum
rospromontory, wood
ruadhred, brown
ruigheslope, run for cattle or shieling
sgorr, sgurrrocky peakSgor Gaibhre - 'goat's peak'
sronnose, point or spur
stobpointStob Ban - 'white peak'
stucpea
suidheseat, level shelf on a hillside
tairbeart (tarbet)portage, isthmusTarbet - a village on Loch Long next to a gap in the hills to Loch Lomond
tighhouseTigh-na-sleabhaich - 'the house by the gullied slope' (ruins on the old military road between Kinlochleven and Fort William)
tulachknoll, hillock
uisgewater, river
vorlichbayBen Vorlich - 'hill of the bay'

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DesertRose 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 10:23 PM
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Whoa Scottish2!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Pretty cool! thumbs_up.gif
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scottish2 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 10:43 PM
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Yeah that second one took forever to post because the entire post is in HTML format and I had to remove all the spaces otherwise the post was a mile long. Too I guess like 20-30 minutes to remove them all but looks good now. Well am off to bed been a long week think I will sleep for a week now LOL laugh.gif

yawn.gif sleep1.gif yawn.gif sleep1.gif yawn.gif sleep1.gif yawn.gif sleep1.gif yawn.gif sleep1.gif yawn.gif
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DesertRose 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 10:53 PM
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Well, you certainly did a great job with the research and the posting. Thanks for all the hard work! notworthy.gif

Now get a good night sleep! wink.gif smile.gif
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MacErca 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 11:22 PM
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Celtic Rose and Scottish2
Fantastic job folks maybe this will help me from tripping over some pronunciations on some of these words probably not all, still everyonce in a while I think people should have some laughter in their lives, for instance when I try to say some of those words. clown2.gif lol.gif

Thanks for all the hard work.


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"Cuimhnich air na daoine o'n d'thaining thu"
Remember the men from whom you are descended.


I am Wolf.
It is my cry you hear in the night,
My eyes that gaze at you from the shadows.
It is my heart that beats in your Soul,
My strength that makes you whole.
I am Wolf. I am in you.
You are in Me. We Are Wolf.
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DesertRose 
Posted: 13-Dec-2003, 11:45 PM
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Thanks Marcera! What would have done without Scottish 2? Hopefully we can all help each other and learn some of this beautiful language. Here is some Holiday phrases to use! smile.gif



Gaelic Sayings To Use Every Day
WINTER HOLIDAYS


English - Scots Gaelic - Pronunciation

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Christmas - Nollaig - nollik
Merry Christmas - Nollaig chridheil - nollik chree-hel
Hogmanay - Oidhche Challainn - oych clallin
New Year's Day - latha na Bliadhn' Uire - laah n vleen oohr
Happy New Year - Bliadhna Mhath Ur - bleen vah oohr

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Celtic_Seba 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 05:31 AM
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hey guys, rose and scottish 2, u gys did a great job i appreciate i was looking for some webpage that had that kind of imformation but i never found any, so i really appreciate u guys. i wguess ill be watching the site and practicing some gaelic in the next few days...thank u agian! tongue.gif
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elsbeth 
Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 05:53 AM
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hello, i am new here, just signed up, but my name is elsbeth, and i have been trying to learn gaelic for about a year now, my father and his father, and my grandmother, so on and so fourth are all from scotland, but for some reason, i must have not gotten much of the scottish-ness, because for the life of me, i can not under stand any- thing at all. I was wondering if anyone could help me understand what it is that i am doing wrong? biggrin.gif
elsbeth[FONT=Courier][SIZE=1]
    [COLOR=DarkGreen]
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    scottish2 
    Posted: 14-Dec-2003, 07:02 AM
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    QUOTE (elsbeth @ Dec 14 2003, 05:53 AM)
    hello, i am new here, just signed up, but my name is elsbeth, and i have been trying to learn gaelic for about a year now, my father and his father, and my grandmother, so on and so fourth are all from scotland, but for some reason, i must have not gotten much of the scottish-ness, because for the life of me, i can not under stand any- thing at all. I was wondering if anyone could help me understand what it is that i am doing wrong? biggrin.gif
    elsbeth

    best thing to do is practice practice practice and when you have done that guess what is next to do? Practice some more LOL laugh.gif

    If your parents speak the language ask them to help maybe when you get better and visit them have Gaelic only days when you only speak Gaelic unless you need help with a word or phrase.
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