Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )



Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> Scots Languages, some sites of interest???
Bookmark and Share
barddas 
Posted: 27-Aug-2003, 01:49 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Offical sacrifice to the guitar gods-Play til you bleed
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 2,030
Joined: 06-Nov-2002
ZodiacWillow

Realm: second star to the right, straight until morning

male






For those interested in finding out more about the languages in which Catriona speaks so proudlyt of, I started looking into them. ( Just skimming the surface) I will post more as time allows.

Just wanted say Thanks Catriona for peaking my interest....thumbs_up.gif smile.gif

Here are a few to get started.....beer_mug.gif


http://www.lallans.co.uk/



http://www.olestig.dk/scotland/scottishlanguages.html
This site has an artlicle about "Gaelic and Scots-
SHOULD AULD LANGUAGES BE FORGOT"


Cheers




--------------------
BARDDAS BLOG/WEB SITE

Co Founder/Member of the KDC

Music is holy, art is sacred, and creativity is power

Everyday is EARTH DAY to a farmer

"Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much."
Oscar Wilde

Some men are drawn to oceans, they cannot breathe unless the air is scented with a salty mist. Others are drawn to land that is flat, and the air is sullen and is leaden as August. My people were drawn to mountains- Earl Hamner Jr.

PMEmail Poster                
Top
barddas 
Posted: 27-Aug-2003, 01:53 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Offical sacrifice to the guitar gods-Play til you bleed
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 2,030
Joined: 06-Nov-2002
ZodiacWillow

Realm: second star to the right, straight until morning

male





This site is the Scots Language Resource Centre-

http://scotsyett.com/faq.asp
PMEmail Poster                
Top
Catriona 
Posted: 27-Aug-2003, 04:59 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Banned Member
***

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 69
Joined: 25-Oct-2002
ZodiacBirch








Glad I piqued your interest, Jason...

As you have discovered, there are a number of Scots 'languages' - although the argument is still ongoing about whether Auld Scots, the Doric, Lallans and Braid Scots ARE languages or just dialects. You know which side of the argument I favour. cool.gif

The first two sites are very good (I know both of them well cool.gif As I told you, I am involved in a number of sites which promote Lallans! king.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Briana 
Posted: 11-Sep-2003, 01:31 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Peasant
*

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 4
Joined: 07-Sep-2003
ZodiacVine


female





I'm new here so please bear with me.

Are there any websites dedicated to learning the Scottish language. I know there are for Irish, so I'm hoping there's one for Scottish.

I have a friend who speaks Welsh, but I want to move to Scotland or Ireland, mainly Scotland (I'm shallow, I like the kilts), and I would love to learn the language before I go.

Also, forgive my ignorace, but the Gaelic reminds me a lot of Danish (which I am and don't speak). Is it because there Northern languages?

Thanks!

Briana
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Catriona 
Posted: 12-Sep-2003, 02:42 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Banned Member
***

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 69
Joined: 25-Oct-2002
ZodiacBirch








QUOTE (Briana @ Sep 11 2003, 07:31 PM)
I'm new here so please bear with me.

Are there any websites dedicated to learning the Scottish language. I know there are for Irish, so I'm hoping there's one for Scottish.

I have a friend who speaks Welsh, but I want to move to Scotland or Ireland, mainly Scotland (I'm shallow, I like the kilts), and I would love to learn the language before I go.

Also, forgive my ignorace, but the Gaelic reminds me a lot of Danish (which I am and don't speak). Is it because there Northern languages?

Thanks!

Briana

Hello Briana
Welcome!

If you are asking about the Scots language, then the sites above are a good starting place. However, if you are talking about Scots Gaelic - and I rather think you must be as you mention Welsh and Irish Gaelic - then I'm afraid I can't help. I do not speak the Gaelic. My interests lie in preserving Auld Scots/Lallans/Doric/Braid - and I'm afraid that these really have to be acquired by listening to speakers, rather than working through a grammar text.... cool.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
ranger 
Posted: 12-Sep-2003, 10:59 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 1,417
Joined: 06-Sep-2003
ZodiacElder

Realm: Western Kentucky

male





Thanks for the website links, Jason. thumbs_up.gif beer_mug.gif


--------------------
"...so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us."

'The Lord of the Rings' - Book one
PMEmail Poster               
Top
masonalex 
Posted: 14-Sep-2003, 11:34 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Peasant
*

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 3
Joined: 12-Sep-2003
ZodiacElder


male





I am new here, but I have enjoyed looking at the websites listed. Gaelic is clearly a very different language from English, but I am not so sure about Scots. I read over some of the text in Scots and I was able to follow a fair amount of it. The grammar structure is, as far as I can tell, the same as English. Some words are different, to be sure, and the spelling and pronunciation would always be different.

But in the US, different regions of the country had very different accents and different words for the same things, and at one time different spelling conventions. Television has a way of homogenizing everything, so the differences are not so sharp as they once were, but they are still there. (In 1984, a native of Charleston, South Carolina sought the Democratic nomination for President. In the all critical New Hampshire primary election, he received almost no votes. Later, it was realized that people in New Hampshire had great difficulty understanding his thick Charleston accent.)

To those more learned on this subject than I, may I pose a question: What is the case to be made for Scots to be a language rather than a dialect? Thanks.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Catriona 
Posted: 15-Sep-2003, 03:07 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Banned Member
***

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 69
Joined: 25-Oct-2002
ZodiacBirch








QUOTE (masonalex @ Sep 14 2003, 05:34 PM)
I am new here, but I have enjoyed looking at the websites listed. Gaelic is clearly a very different language from English, but I am not so sure about Scots. I read over some of the text in Scots and I was able to follow a fair amount of it. The grammar structure is, as far as I can tell, the same as English. Some words are different, to be sure, and the spelling and pronunciation would always be different.

But in the US, different regions of the country had very different accents and different words for the same things, and at one time different spelling conventions. Television has a way of homogenizing everything, so the differences are not so sharp as they once were, but they are still there. (In 1984, a native of Charleston, South Carolina sought the Democratic nomination for President. In the all critical New Hampshire primary election, he received almost no votes. Later, it was realized that people in New Hampshire had great difficulty understanding his thick Charleston accent.)

To those more learned on this subject than I, may I pose a question: What is the case to be made for Scots to be a language rather than a dialect? Thanks.

It is a complex question.... and I have been involved in the promotion of Lallans/Braid/Auld Scots/Doric for many years. This URL has put the argument quite well. This is an extremely well-regarded site by Scottish natives - I have been involved with a number of the sites which promote Lallans...
http://www.lallans.co.uk/furthsettins/info.html

You are wrong about the grammar being the same by the way - ask any of the natives on here - although we are very much in the minority!

'Wir ain leid'..... 'our own speech/language' - Tell me what's 'English' about that?! smile.gif cool.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
masonalex 
Posted: 15-Sep-2003, 01:46 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Peasant
*

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 3
Joined: 12-Sep-2003
ZodiacElder


male





Thanks for the link. It was very interesting. The author's point seems to be that Englich and Scots derive from the same language, hence the similiarities between the two. It brings to mind Spanish and Portugese, which are related but different. I still think that the grammer is similar. Scots spelling is intimidating, but then if one reads Cranmer's 1549 Book of Common Prayer, the English spelling from that time is pretty bizarre to the modern eye.

This article was very illuminating on one point close to home. In the 19th Century American Southland, working class Southerners were usually of Scots or Scots Irish ancestry and they referred to themselves as "Southrons." I have always been puzzled by that name until reading in this article that some Scots once refered to English as "Southron." I suppose that as these American Scots lived in the South, that is how they thought of themselves.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Catriona 
Posted: 15-Sep-2003, 04:54 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Banned Member
***

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 69
Joined: 25-Oct-2002
ZodiacBirch








I am glad you enjoyed the link. Wir Ain Leid is one of the better Lallans sites....


The spelling of Lallans (when I say Lallans, I mean Doric/AS/Braid as well - but too longwinded to spell it out each time!) is at best, fluid.... However, you need to know how it is pronounced by a native to know where to 'accent' the word. For instance in some cases, the same 'English' word would be pronounced quite differently in each country! Ask Barddas - he visited Scotland earlier this year - and had to 'tune' in to the cadence of our speech. And, as a East Coast, Central-Belter (as we are known) from Edinburgh, I would find Aberdonians speaking together quite intimidating.... I might only get one word in every 3 or so - but write it down, and I'd have no problems. The Weegies for example, have their own version of Lallans - quite different to Edinburgh. AD is a German, living with her partner in Fife... her English is really good - but she had a bit of difficulty tuning into the conversation when Fifers were talking together!

Your analogy re Spanish and Portugese is a good one....
PMEmail Poster               
Top
DesertRose 
Posted: 07-Dec-2003, 01:06 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Celtic Guardian
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 6,913
Joined: 09-Nov-2003
ZodiacAlder

Realm: The desert of Arizona

female





Catriona! This has been a very interesting thread to me. I did not see it before. Not sure how I missed it! unsure.gif I am involved in two Scottish sites where there are both Scots and people from all over the world and the emphasis is always on learning to speak Gaelic. I had the impression that Gaelic was the language of the Highlands, not the lowlands. No one I have ever spoken to has ever mentioned Lallans to me. I looked over all the links that barddas so graciously provided and does the Lallans look like the first link he posted? It looks like a mixture of English and a Scottish dialect to me and I was just wondering if that is what the Lallans language looked like. In Gaelic, Ciamar a sibh, is how are you. How would how are you be written in Lallans? I hope I am not being too stupid here. You must really roll your eyes when you see my posts! unsure.gif

Many thanks! smile.gif


--------------------
Fine art & photography by DESERT ROSE IMAGES
http://www.desertrose-images.com
PMEmail PosterUsers WebsiteMy Photo Album               
Top
Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 07-Dec-2003, 10:11 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



The Wolf Lady
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 2,966
Joined: 06-Apr-2002
ZodiacIvy

Realm: Fife, Scotland

female





biggrin.gif quite right Catriona, just imagine that poor wee German coming to Fife for the first time ! tongue.gif I'm actually starting to speak it myself. I have to say I don't have much problems understanding other accents by now, northerners sometimes give me a bit of problems, but I listen to different radio stations to get into all these accents..

I think Scots (might it be Doric, Fife, Lallans, Weegie or whatever) is quite nice to listen to. although it's hard to understand at first, when you're not used to it. My BF's stepdad comes from the Trossachs, he speaks nice cool.gif


--------------------
Moderator: The Playground (RPG)

Carpe Jugulum
Carved with a twisted smile
An epitaph for sorrow
Sethian - Epitaph

If anybody wants a costum signature, pm me!
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 07-Dec-2003, 10:45 AM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



The Wolf Lady
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 2,966
Joined: 06-Apr-2002
ZodiacIvy

Realm: Fife, Scotland

female





I forgot to add something wink.gif Rose, casually here in Fife you would usually say "Hows you?" You can compare Scots to a dialect of English, although I myself have another theory about it.

In Scots, I know is "I ken" which reminds me alot of the German "Ich kenne" and there is other examples of it. English & German have the same roots, the only difference being that English developed of the northern form (same with Dutch, for example) while modern German developed from the southern form (as well as Austrian and SwitzerdŁtch (swiss-german).
I personally have the theory that English and Scots again have the same roots, but developed differently. I would have to talk to a linguist but that is my personal idea of it.
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Arianrhod 
Posted: 07-Dec-2003, 12:26 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



Lady of Starlight and Petal
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 1,230
Joined: 19-Oct-2003
ZodiacVine

Realm: Barony-Marche of the Debatable Lands

female





Aon...

Thanks for the "lesson" in Fife speak last night !

In Service to the Dream,
Paula


--------------------
Proud member of Clan Mac Roni , CEO of The KDC

The curve is mightier than the sword ...

"He's twitching, because ,
mah axe is embedded in
his nervious system " !
LOTR
PMEmail Poster               
Top
Aon_Daonna 
Posted: 07-Dec-2003, 03:40 PM
Quote Post

Member is Offline



The Wolf Lady
********

Group: Celtic Nation
Posts: 2,966
Joined: 06-Apr-2002
ZodiacIvy

Realm: Fife, Scotland

female





*lol* aye sure, anytime, Paula.. wink.gif
before anybody else asks me as well: be warned our lessons consisted of swearwurds wink.gif biggrin.gif
PMEmail Poster               
Top
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

 








Celtic RadioTM broadcasts through Live365.com and StreamLicensing.com which are officially licensed under SoundExchange, ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and SOCAN.
©2014 Celtic Radio Network, Highlander Radio, Celtic Moon, Celtic Dance, Ye O' Celtic Pub and Celt-Rock-Radio.
All rights and trademarks reserved. Read our Privacy Policy.
Celtic Graphics ©2014, Cari Buziak


Link to CelticRadio.net!
Link to CelticRadio.net
View Broadcast Status and Statistics!

Best Viewed With IE 8.0 (1680 x 1050 Resolution), Javascript & Cookies Enabled.


[Home] [Top]

Celtic Hearts Gallery | Celtic Mates Dating | My Celtic Friends | Celtic Music Radio | Family Heraldry | Medival Kingdom | Top Celtic Sites | Web Celt Blog | Video Celt