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Celtic Radio Community > World Showcase > Welcome To World Show Case


Posted by: Macfive 06-Aug-2004, 08:34 PM
Welcome to our World Show case featuring countries that have decedents of the Celts.

Feel free to post information on any country, questions or history. Don't see your country, then let us know!

Posted by: Viriato 05-Jun-2005, 06:43 AM
Hi there!

i'm a new arrival, just few days old into the Forum.

There is something that always has puzzle me...

I come from Galiza and we always thought that Asturias was also a Celt country but I can see that, except us, nobody else seems to reconize them as Celts.

The thing is that I included their flag in my business and personal cards, business website and personal website and all my stationery. Oh, dear, dear, dear...!

Can someone put it clear for me, please?

Posted by: Nancy-Raven 16-Jul-2005, 11:30 AM
It's the first time I saw a forum for genral celtic nation.After the message left by Viriato,I was curious to know if somewhere over the web a map show where the celt live because I realize I have no idea where is the Isle of Manx or Galicia.

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 18-Jul-2005, 12:55 PM
As I understand it, Galicia and Asturias base their claim to being modern Celtic nations on a the survival of Celtic traditions similar to traditions in other Celtic nations, particularly Brittany, although the Celtic language, which is the most accepted criterion of modern Celtic nation status, has not survived in either Galicia or Asturias. Thus, different commentators speak of six, seven, or eight Celtic nations, depending on whether either Galicia or Asturias or both are included in the list. As I understand it (and I could be wrong, as I don't as much about Galicia and Asturias as other Celtic Nations), some people count Galicia, but not Asturias, because they consider Galicia to have a stronger Celtic consciousness than Asturias.
IMHO, if someone from Galicia considers Asturias to be Celtic, that's enough reason for me to do the same.
The Celtic League, which applies a strict language litmus test, does not include either Galicia or Asturias as Celtic nations. See http://www.manxman.co.im/cleague/ for more information and a map.
Personally, I think moderm Celticness is largely a matter of self-identification.


Posted by: fruitbat1 15-Jan-2006, 07:02 PM
The Isle of Man is in between Britain & Ireland in the Irish Sea biggrin.gif

Posted by: GJL 30-May-2006, 08:02 PM
QUOTE (Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas @ 18-Jul-2005, 01:55 PM)
Please excuse me for being a little late in my adding to this discussion. As someone of Asturian background living in the U.S., I just wanted to clarify.

In regard to the following statement:

"As I understand it, Galicia and Asturias base their claim to being modern Celtic nations on a the survival of Celtic traditions similar to traditions in other Celtic nations, particularly Brittany, although the Celtic language, which is the most accepted criterion of modern Celtic nation status, has not survived in either Galicia or Asturias. Thus, different commentators speak of six, seven, or eight Celtic nations, depending on whether either Galicia or Asturias or both are included in the list. "

thumbs_up.gif  This is a very accurate statement of the way things presently are. 

http://www7.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0603/feature3/images/mp_download.3.pdf

As to the following:

"The Celtic League, which applies a strict language litmus test, does not include either Galicia or Asturias as Celtic nations."

This is correct insofar as the League has not accepted either Galicia or Asturias as members due to the strict language-based definition of Celticity that the League goes by. However, the League has nonetheless acknowledged that under other criteria, such as culture, both Galicia and Asturias can be considered Celtic nations. The website of the Celtic league International states that the Leaguehttp://www.celtic-league.org/id19.htm  The website of the American branch of the Celtic league states that both Galicia and Asturiashttp://www.celticleague.org/celtic_nations.html


As an Asturian, I strongly assert that the Asturias is indeed a strongly celtic region.  Many have already given recognition to this. See http://groups.msn.com/CelticOrigins and http://www.nachs.info/regions.htm.  Asturias is often included in http://www.celebrationofcelts.com/home.html and Asturian celtic musical groups such as http://www.llandecubel.com/are frequent guests on celtic music festivals such as Lorient, Celtic Colours, etc.

For more about Asturias specifically, see http://www.arteasturias.com/aboutAsturias.html and http://www.nachs.info/regions/asturias.htm

Hope this helps, and encourages you to include Asturias as a celtic nation.  smile.gif  http://www.celticstoreusa.com/

Thank you to my brother from Galicia for supporting us!  thumbs_up.gif

thumbs_up.gif

Posted by: ShadowDarkFyre 31-May-2006, 04:42 PM
anyone think about the two Cletic Nations on the Atlantic side: Nova Scotia and Newfoundland...?



Posted by: Rebecca Ann 24-Mar-2007, 09:09 PM
Where would I fit in the Seven Nations. My family traces back to all Seven. My Kneeland line according to our family history goes back to the Vikings. I have one uncle that is listed as Black Irish. My grandmother told me that the Black Irish are the Scots that went to northern Ireland and they were called black because of their ruddy skin which is much darker than that of the Irish.
RebeccaAnn

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 25-Mar-2007, 07:47 AM
QUOTE (Rebecca Ann @ 24-Mar-2007, 10:09 PM)
My grandmother told me that the Black Irish are the Scots that went to northern Ireland and they were called black because of their ruddy skin which is much darker than that of the Irish.
RebeccaAnn

I was always under the impression, that the Black Irish were Spaniards, who fled Spain during the Inquisition. Can't say that I have ever heard the Scots referred that way before. Since Ireland was a vacant land and had no true natives, the people had to come from somewhere and Scotland is certainly a strong possibility.

Posted by: oldraven 26-Mar-2007, 06:30 AM
Considering that the entire of the western part of modern Spain was at one time considered to be a unified Celtic region, at least in Anchient literature, as well as the enormous region of Celtiberia (the cultural mix of Celts and Iberians), I would quite comfortably call Asturias a Celtic region (if not nation) of antiquity. So far as I know, when this was an Independant Celtic State (and I use the words State and Nation loosely), there may have been tribal borders, thought no national border between the two modern principalities.

What we know today, through archeology and anchient literature, of the area actually seems to divide the principality of Asturias directly down the middle (from what I can see, the line can vaguely be drawn from around Piedras Blancas and Llanos de Somerón, and on to its borders). One side in Celtic Spain, (which has now been reduced to Galicia) and on the other the Celtiberian region.

Nova Scotia and Newfoundland can never be considered Celtic Nations, since there has never been a Self Governed Independant Celtic State here. If we look to Europe to see what constitutes as a Celtic Nation, we must look at these new world lands as so. It would be Mi'kmaq (as Welsh is...), as Algonquian (...to the Celts). By the time the Celts got here, even with their surviving Celtic languages, they were British by Government.

Posted by: oldraven 26-Mar-2007, 06:41 AM
QUOTE (A Shrule Egan @ 25-Mar-2007, 06:47 AM)
QUOTE (Rebecca Ann @ 24-Mar-2007, 10:09 PM)
My grandmother told me that the Black Irish are the Scots that went to northern Ireland and they were called black because of their ruddy skin which is much darker than that of the Irish.
RebeccaAnn

I was always under the impression, that the Black Irish were Spaniards, who fled Spain during the Inquisition. Can't say that I have ever heard the Scots referred that way before. Since Ireland was a vacant land and had no true natives, the people had to come from somewhere and Scotland is certainly a strong possibility.

In addition to that, consider who the Scots were to begin with. They were Irish Raiders, calling themselves Scotti, who entered Pictish lands and began assimliating the people there (assimilating, in this case, is a nice way of saying erasing, without killing, which was all but complete by 800ad. A date that is quite recent, by documented history's standards. Too recent to have pretty much no indications left of who the Picts were. A few carved standing stones). Scots are, in essence, Irish mixed with Pict (which would explain why the English/Saxons refered two both people with the one name of Irish for so long).

Posted by: Rebecca Ann 27-Mar-2007, 06:52 AM
What nation am I? My family that we have been able to trace so far goes back to 1225 Scotland, 1600 Wales., 1500 England, 1700 Ireland . The Scottish line, according to family history goes back to the Vikings. I am also French, German, Polish and American Indian.
I am of the Clan Kneeland/ Cleland. Our unofficial clan chief lives in Australia. We have no official chief as no one has the money or papers required by the government to be recognized. But even so we are still family and all of us that have been scattered throughout the world recognize John Cleland of Australia as our clan chief. My Irish are Prunty/ Bonte. The English are Andrews and Chute. The Welsh are Edwards, who were driven from Wales at the time they threw out the Quakers.
RebeccaAnn

Posted by: oldraven 27-Mar-2007, 08:10 AM
Being from Illinois (state motto: Thanks for not pronouncing the 'S'), I'd say your nation is The United States of America. wink.gif



I too am made of a varied mix of Celt/Gaul and Germanic. Genetically, at any rate. My family (John Reeves) arrived in Chebucto (Halifax) in 1749, and my mother's family (MacLean and Jewers) came much more recent, though I haven't gotten to that point yet. It's safe to say I'm Canadian. smile.gif

I don't think it's as easy as saying 'I'm Welsh/Irish/Breton/Manx, etc.' anymore. By the end of the Dark Ages, the Atlantic Celts had so much influence and interweaving of cultures and peoples that they were essentially one mass people who put their own distinct spin on Medieval life. Most surviving Celtic Nations at the time were dealing with the same issues (and enemies) at the same time. Norse Raiders and Anglo/Saxon (English) expansionism (later Protestant Reformation). What nation didn't have internal feuding? Amazingly, they still couldn't see the bigger picture enough to unite against their common enemies.

You're a Celt, my dear. They were one people, they just didn't know it yet. laugh.gif

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 27-Mar-2007, 04:51 PM
QUOTE (oldraven @ 27-Mar-2007, 09:10 AM)

You're a Celt, my dear. They were one people, they just didn't know it yet. laugh.gif

laugh.gif Adam, that was very well said. Are you running for higher office again? laugh.gif

Posted by: oldraven 27-Mar-2007, 05:30 PM
QUOTE (A Shrule Egan @ 27-Mar-2007, 03:51 PM)
QUOTE (oldraven @ 27-Mar-2007, 09:10 AM)

You're a Celt, my dear. They were one people, they just didn't know it yet. laugh.gif

laugh.gif Adam, that was very well said. Are you running for higher office again? laugh.gif

In Jersey? cool.gif One never knows.








tongue.gif
Nope. I just finished reading the most eye opening and satisfying book I've ever had the luck of laying my hands on. Honestly a must read.

user posted image

Posted by: Rebecca Ann 29-Mar-2007, 07:56 PM
Thank you oldraven. I always wondered. I am not from Illinois. I just happen to live here since I was 6. My home is the mountains of Virginia. I am a coal miner's grandaughter. I asked Gram my heritage and she told me half our family came over on the ship and the other half were here to greet them. Momma said we are mutts, a mix of just about everything. My 4-H leader called us hines 57 variety. They all taught me to stand proud of who I am and of all my people. The way you put things I guess that would make Jim half German, well acutually Prussian seeing as his mother's people came over before there was a Germany, and half Canadian.
We are all family.
RebeccaAnn

Posted by: Aaediwen 30-Mar-2007, 03:21 PM
Bill Murry said it best in Stripes. "Our forefathers were kicked out of every decent country in the world! We are the wretched refuse. We're mutts! Here's proof! His nose is cold!"

100% pure bred American Mutt!

Posted by: Rebecca Ann 02-Apr-2007, 05:59 PM
I don't know Bill Murry and you may be pure mutt with a cold nose but I have found that most mutts including you have a warm heart. It is the warm heart that is the most important. Besides if it wasn't for us mutts that constantly get chased out of places and as a result have become mighty fighters this world wouldn't be much. It is the born fighters and warriors who survive.
RebeccaAnn

Posted by: BrengaAstur4me 03-Apr-2007, 06:44 PM
asturias and galicia are most certainly celtic nations, read a history book or look it up

Posted by: oldraven 03-Aug-2007, 12:17 PM
QUOTE (BrengaAstur4me @ 03-Apr-2007, 05:44 PM)
asturias and galicia are most certainly celtic nations, read a history book or look it up

Nice first post. rolleyes.gif

Posted by: 0Ash0Tree0 09-Feb-2008, 02:52 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Irish

The Scots that settled (some unwillingly) in Northern Ireland are called Ulster Scots.
I did an Irish Studies minor in university...it finally comes in handy. lol

Posted by: Boudica 21-Mar-2008, 09:18 PM
I think I see where there might be some confusion coming in to play here. The Ulster Scots and the Irish that settled in Dal Riada are two different groups separated by a few hundred years.

The Ulster Scots are indeed from Scotland. They were Scots that emigrated and settled in Ulster starting around 1600. They mostly came from Galloway, Ayrshire, the Border, and the Lowlands. There is a really cool museum near Omagh in Northern Ireland the the Ulster-Scot Agency has. http://www.ulsterscotsagency.com/

The Irish that settled in Dal Riada came over much earlier. Clan Lamont's (on my da's side) first recorded Chief is Sir Lauman in 1235. My da's had the genetic tracing done and he is indeed descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, the progenitor of the Uí Néill in Ireland. The connection between Lamont and Ulster can be seen in the symbol for Ulster and the Lamont clan badge. Both feature a raised left hand.

This second group is the one that is credited with intermarrying with the Picts and settling in Scotland.

It's really easy to get confused with the history of the Celtic Nations! All I can recommend is to read, read, read, and then read some more. And get your butt over there if you can. I was there with my family in Sept 2006 and we're going back next year for the Gathering. And in a few years, I'm moving there!

Posted by: Boudica 21-Mar-2008, 09:21 PM
This is what I get for trying to post when I'm tired and hungry!

OldRaven said it best - When you get down to it, we're all Celts! In fact, whenever I'm asked for ethnicity on forms, I mark "Other" and the fill in Celt. Confuses the snot out of people around here! tongue.gif

Posted by: Jermy 21-Jan-2010, 10:06 AM
Not seeing a Czech flag as a 'Celtic Nation', I thought I'd post here smile.gif Folks often ask us (and quite reasonably so) 'What's a band from the Czech Republic doing playing Irish, Scotttish and Breton music?' and our answer is usually, 'Well, apart from it being bloomin lovely music, Celtic-ness is deep in the heart of this country'. There are remains of Celtic settlements and hill forts here, and, well, we have Czech bagpipes too! All the best from Jeremy and Poitin.

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