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Morlock 
Posted: 13-Jun-2005, 05:31 AM
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Hallo all.


I was trying to do reseach today on slang and regional dialects the better to create believable characters in my writings. I also have a strong interest in Celtic Studies. There were not many leads during my use of search engines, but one of the links went to a conversation on Gaelic and regional dialects from June of last year. So I thought this forum was certainly in my interests, even though I don't really have good enough power on this computer to listen to the radio broadcasts.

Anyway, one character I'm working on is a late teen who was born in Nova Scotia in 1877. He is at least half Scottish if not three quarters, so my research with him has been Victorian, Scottish, and Maritime Canadian. It's a very difficult thing to determine as to what he will speak like and what he would be likely to talk about. I myself am rather isolated on the West Coast of NA and have neither met nor spoken with a Scotsman, a Nova Scotian, or, of course, a Victorian. (I'm also not sure how to use this forum.)

My Gaelic language studies are marginal and I've only studied Irish Gaelic as it is. As enthusiastic as I am I've let it go by the wayside as I'm unfortunately a pedestrian in a car-dependent community and so I haven't had anyone to speak Irish Gaelic with. I've only gotten as far as leaving the outgoing voicemail in Gaelic to deter telemarketers. (And if anyone is wondering, it really does help cut back on getting telemarketing calls.)

So, that's my story.
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Aaediwen 
Posted: 13-Jun-2005, 05:42 PM
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hehe smile.gif Sounds like the time I answered a call on the unlisted line in German, confirmed it was a telemarketer or survey, and proceeded to act like I didn't speak a word of English.

As for hearing Gaelic spoken, that is a difficult animal to see in the wild. Seems like I recall finding a Gaelic radio show on the Internet once before, but not sure where it was anymore (or if it's still online), you might Google for such.

Feel free to dive right into the forums smile.gif Best wishes


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C Dubh 
Posted: 14-Jun-2005, 07:26 AM
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To listen to Irish Gaelic Radio try this:- Raidi na Gaeltachta

To listen to Scots Gaelic try this:-Radio nan Gaidheal

Click Eist (Listen) on both sites to hear the broadcast.


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C Dubh 
Posted: 14-Jun-2005, 07:29 AM
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Oops first link doesn't seem to work. Try this....
Raidi na Gaeltachta
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stoirmeil 
Posted: 14-Jun-2005, 12:14 PM
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Woohoo, a Ch Dubh! Tapadh leat!

I have a question for Morlock -- is this character a highlander, and does he speak Gaelic, or is he a Doric-speaking lowlander? It doesn't seem you quite specify, although maybe migration patterns I am ignorant of answer the question implicitly.

If he's a lowlander, you can try reading a couple of older (and to my opinion very fine) dog stories that you can access free biggrin.gif copies of through the Gutenberg Project: Greyfriar's Bobbie, and Bob Son of Battle. These are out of print period novels, and the dialect representation is faithful and very consistent orthographically. (Besides, they are great stories.)

Good luck! It sounds like a fascinating research journey, even above the adventure of writing the book.
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stoirmeil 
Posted: 14-Jun-2005, 12:22 PM
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Eh!
Sorry, lad, I should have fetched you the link:

http://www.gutenberg.org/

PG is the best thing since I don't know what. I would also recommed the large selection of the writings of George MacDonald, the great 19th century writer of fairy tales and other fantasy and spiritual stuff, who was the acknowleged and revered forerunner of the Inklings (Tolkien, CS Lewis, etc.). Project Gutenberg has made reams of his stuff available.
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