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> Mincemeat Shortbread, Sue Lawrence recipe
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Catriona 
Posted: 02-Oct-2003, 07:48 AM
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Sue Lawrence is a cook from Edinburgh. She won the BBC Television 'Masterchef' competition a number of years ago.

She has published a number of books, and her recipes are normally based on seasonal Scottish ingredients.

I'm going to make a batch of these shortbread squares on Saturday morning - hope my visitors like it!

BTW, the 'mincemeat' is the sweet, fruity one, not minced beef/pork etc!



Mincemeat Shortbread

Ms Lawrence says that this is nice eaten cold as a 'biscuit' with a nice pot of tea, but is equally good served warm with custard or creme fraiche. I've served it both ways and it is scrumptious!

Makes 16 squares

227g/8oz plain flour
28g/1oz semolina
28g/1oz custard powder
57g/2oz icing sugar
198g/7oz unsalted butter, cut into cubes
about 4 tablespoons cold water
397g/14oz best mincemeat
caster sugar, to dust

Preheat the oven to 190 C/375 F/Gas mark 5. Sift the flour, semolina,
custard powder and icing sugar into a bowl. Combine well. Rub in the butter
until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.Add just enough cold water to bind
the mixture together - start with 3 tablespoons and increase to 4, if
necessary. Press two-thirds of the mixture into a buttered 23cm/9in square
tin, pressing down with the palms of your hands so it fills into all
corners. Spread the mincemeat on top, leaving a narrow margin all round.
Using your fingers, crumble the remaining shortbread mixture over the top.
Then gently press down with your fingers to ensure an even coverage. Bake in
the oven for 30 minutes, or until golden brown on top. Cut into 16 squares
while still hot. Allow to cool in the tin, then transfer to a wire rack to
become completely cold.]
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3Ravens 
Posted: 09-Nov-2003, 11:25 PM
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Catronia,
We have a supermarket here the size of a small village, and I actually found Bird's custard powder! I'm going to try these, I'll let you know how they turn out!


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Catriona 
Posted: 10-Nov-2003, 03:44 AM
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3R
That's great. Bird's instant custard is part of most British children's childhood - served with pies, puddings etc. Or used in a good English trifle... biggrin.gif

Did you manage to find good Christmas mincemeat - or have you had to make your own?

I think it is interesting how some British dishes have been absorbed into the American diet, perhaps without people knowing their origins. But a number of my friends in the USA have said that mince-pies, a traditional part of our Christmas fare, does not seem to have 'travelled' well!
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3Ravens 
Posted: 10-Nov-2003, 12:05 PM
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Well, I found some jarred mincemeat, we'll see how good it is!
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3Ravens 
Posted: 12-Nov-2003, 01:56 AM
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The shortbread part was fantastic! The mincemeat much less so... wink.gif Probably the fault of the mincemeat! I think I'll try this again with something else for filling. Maybe seedless raspberry jam, or a fruit pie filling...or just plain shortbread!
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Catriona 
Posted: 12-Nov-2003, 04:11 AM
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I think the quality of the mincemeat was probably the problem, 3R!

The mincemeat should be extremely 'firm' in the jar, filled with the more expensive fruits, rather than just the grated apple - which generally turns to water when heated, anyway.... cool.gif

You could always try slices of sauteed apple - slice them thinly and brown in hot butter in a small sautee pan, add a little icing sugar to really help to caramelise the apples - and then add apples to a little of the mincemeat mixture.
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barddas 
Posted: 12-Nov-2003, 09:52 AM
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QUOTE (Catriona @ Nov 10 2003, 04:44 AM)

I think it is interesting how some British dishes have been absorbed into the American diet, perhaps without people knowing their origins. But a number of my friends in the USA have said that mince-pies, a traditional part of our Christmas fare, does not seem to have 'travelled' well!

I think that mincemeat has held up primarily in "the south" of the country. Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, And the Carolinas.... At least through my research of southern foods that seems to be the way of things. And my grandparents ALWAYS have it during Autumn/winter holidays.


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Catriona 
Posted: 12-Nov-2003, 10:37 AM
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That's interesting, Jason.

One of my best friends is an American in WV. She'd heard about mincemeat but hadn't seen it or tasted it... She now loves it!

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barddas 
Posted: 12-Nov-2003, 10:55 AM
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I think it is. wink.gif
I think the main reason for its survival in those areas is they were originally settled by Scottish and Irish Immigrants. I was always told by my grandfather Montgomery "that this area was settled here because it reminded our ancestors of where they came from. Lots of hills and then mountains, with lots of wildlife, streams and rivers, and good soil...."

And after being to Scotland, and driving through the area where my family originated. I can see the resemblance a bit.... smile.gif
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