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jime307 
Posted: 05-Nov-2007, 08:30 PM
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I want to know what everyone thinks the best Linux OS is!


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Aaediwen 
Posted: 07-Nov-2007, 06:37 PM
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Depends on what you want of your Linux, IMHO.

For someone who is just getting started, or who just wants a good working desktop, Ubuntu or Kubuntu would be the way to go IMHO. Although I've heard PCLinuxOS is good for that too, but the only times I've used PCLinuxOS I didn't like it much personally. Beyond that it's a matter of taste really. If you're someone who likes to get in to the system a little more and really start exploring the flexibility of a Linux system, then something like Debian or Slackware might be a good option. And if you really want to micro-manage the system and control every little aspect of it, then try something like LFS (My personal favorite) or Gentoo. A word of advice though, don't try those last two until you're comfortable in one of the others. (in #lfs-support we will tell you to use Ubuntu for a while and try again if you come in asking what cd and mkdir are for).

Ultimately though, Linux is Linux. Anything you can do on one distro, you can do on any other. The only real exceptions to this might be if you change hardware architecture (Such as between ix86 and Sparc). Personally, I went from RedHat and Mandrake (the Ubuntus of their day) direct to LFS. If you wanted to, you could set up an Ubuntu system to use RedHat RPMs. Ubuntu is inherantly bloated as Linux distros go (Although still not as bad as Windows). It took an hour to boot on my 486 DX/2 after a fresh install. But you could easilly strip it down to boot within a couple minutes on the same machine. I actually did cut out about half the crap in it and cut the boot time to about 15 minutes.

As another example, most of the the Beyond Linux From Scratch build instructions will work on any Linux system without much trouble. So as I say, since you can do anything with any distro, often in much the same way, once you get your feet wet it's a matter of preference. And if you ask me, no one distro is really any better or worse than any other. Ubuntu is probably easiest for the new user to get comfortable with, but at the same time at a Linux fest I attended a couple weeks ago I think most of the machines there were running it. And several of the people there were Linux gods.

Ubuntu seems to be the communal favorite, but if you ask me there is no 'best distro'


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tsargent62 
Posted: 04-Dec-2007, 02:13 PM
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Hey Aaediwen!

I myself have used Ubuntu both ix86 and Sparc. It is by far the easiest to install and update. I haven't had the startup problems you've had, but I guess that's what happens when you try to run Linux on a door stop. wink.gif

One thing I do like about Ubuntu is that it has a very user friendly update feature. It alerts you when there are updates and all you have to do is click on an icon and it presents you with alll the updates. You can pick and choose which ones you want. Ubuntu automatically downloads and installs everything you pick.

About the only distro I don't like is SuSE. They want you to go through that clugey YaST2 interface for all the system admin chores. And they don't put things where most other distros do, making it very hard to find config files and the like. Red Hat and Ubuntu are both better that way, IMHO.


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Aaediwen 
Posted: 04-Dec-2007, 06:03 PM
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I wouldn't really consider it a 'problem' as such. As you noticed, it had reason to be a tad sluggish.
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kb0iic 
Posted: 09-Jan-2008, 10:52 PM
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The best Linux OS is one of a few factors and can't be based from other user's experiences easily.

Each person has a different skill level with computer hardware and various operating systems. Some know exactly what the computer consist of, right down to the hardware model, revision, and firmware. Others have no clue. Others know how to install software into a separate location and modify an install and tweak every portion of their OS, others do not or don't care to know. And many don't even know what architecture for which their system is built.

There are those that just want to install and get stuff going and not deal with the hassle of choosing everything, and then there are those that like command line installs.

A person needs to try the common Linux distributions out there and figure out which ones work well for their cases.

I'd go with the previous replies of what is used based on what you want to do. Debian was decent with apt-get and it is good all around for most anything and there is a huge user base with a very good support base.

You can find an OS that looks and feels like windows, or you can find and use one that feels like using an Alpha in a missile silo.

I've used Slackware since release 3, and once you get your hands wet at the command line, a whole new world of power opens up.

Then, build your own operating system from scratch, like Aaediwen and I have done in the past. That way you have what you want, where you want, how you want. You can figure out your own way to update stuff if you wish or desire, and you can, cause you know how it all works.

Meanwhile, since none of that is a big issue now, just try a few distros, or all of them, and find out which ones work best for you.

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jime307 
Posted: 02-Feb-2008, 11:01 PM
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I've got it figured out, I know my programming and so I think that Debian and Ubuntu are best, Debian for customability, and Ubuntu for user-friendlyness, I might try building an OS but its a while off, Right now I'm just using Linux for the Usability and the ease of programming on it.
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Patriot1776 
Posted: 28-Nov-2008, 01:15 PM
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Haven't tried any other distro than Ubuntu, and I'm kinda now committed to it as I'm not the only person using my computer. A senior citizen also uses this computer email and card games and so user-friendliness is an important reason I need to stay with Ubuntu.

Only problem really with using Linux from a multi-user standpoint in my case is that I have to be who switches it over to the other person's user account as they don't like at all having to login to be able to safely check their email. I don't really see a workaround for this. For them, they really want to be able to just in one click switch the computer to their account to access their email, and I don't see a way to do that in Linux without compromising system security.


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