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Catriona 
Posted: 26-Nov-2002, 11:05 AM
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Soups are a favourite in Scotland - particularly in winter - or as we say when 'the nights ur fair drawin


This post has been edited by Catriona on 28-Jul-2004, 06:04 PM
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Cabbagehome 
Posted: 26-Nov-2002, 12:50 PM
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::viking Oh yes, a nice big pot of soup. My mom would make a vegitable soup.  We kids would know if it snowed the soup would be there for us when we got home. (In New Mexico the average rain fall is only 10 inchs, not many days of snow.)  She also made patatoe soup. In Michigan, I have met clam chouder and cabbage soup.  Favorits stem back to NM pinto bean & ham, and Manoodle. (no spelled right). I'm addicted to the chilli.
I'm going to try this one, I got all the ingredents on hand, if the grand kids didn't beat me to the carrots. (they seem to think, the horses need carrots more)
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maggiemahone1 
Posted: 26-Nov-2002, 01:56 PM
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Chicken soup is a favorite of mine.  Not only does it taste good, but it is healthy for a person, especially when you feel a cold coming on.  Instead of potatoes or rice, I use penne or rotini pasta.  It taste delicious on a cold day or on any day!  :D

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Catriona 
Posted: 26-Nov-2002, 06:28 PM
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SCOTTISH LENTL SOUP
3 pts water - Imperial pints, not American
Small bacon joint (to flavour and to eat later!
2 lb carrots - coarsely grated
2 large onions, chopped coarsely
4 oz lentils - which have been soaked overnight. (Orange ones, not puy lentils!
2 large leeks
Salt and pepper to taste - the salt may not be required, depending on how salty the bacon joint turns out to be!

Put water in a large pan, add the bacon joint. Bring to the boil and then simmer gently for about one hour. Skim off any fat which may have risen to the top of the pan.

Add the carrots, onions, lentils and leeks to the pan. Check seasoning and add, as required. Simmer with a lid on until the vegetables are cooked and the meat is fully cooked. At least another hour. If the soup gets too thick, just add more water.

If preferred, you could seive the soup before serving, but I find that leaving it to simmer gently until all the vegetables have broken down gives a better texture.

You can either remove the boiled bacon to eat cold later, or shred and return to the soup.

Serve with lots of granary bread.
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Catriona 
Posted: 26-Nov-2002, 06:34 PM
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CULLEN SKINK
(This is a fish soup - and is delicious!)
This serves 4-6, depending on appetites.

1 lb Finnan haddie or if you can't get Finnan haddies, any smoked haddock
1 onion finely chopped
1 pt (600 ml) fish or chicken stock
8 oz thin small leeks, finely chopped
8 oz cooked and mashed potatoes
2 oz butter
1 pt single cream
1 egg yolk
salt and pepper to taste
parsley to garnish

Put haddock and onion in a shallow saucepan and JUST cover with cold water. Bring slowly to the boil and simmer gently for about 10 minutes until the fish is tender. Strain and reserve the liquid, but discard the onion.

Remove skin from fish and flake. Retain the skin and bones (if it wasn't filleted) to put with the reserved liquid. Bring it to the boil and simmer for about 10 mins. Strain again and discard skin and bones. Mix the remaining liquid with the stock in a large pan. Bring to the boil and add the leeks. Boil until tender. Mix in the butter and mashed tatties until mix is smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste. Beat cream and egg yolk together until smooth and add to the soup. Stir until it is heated through, but ensure you don't let it boil or it will curdle. Sprinkle with parsley and serve hot with crusty granary bread.

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Catriona 
Posted: 26-Nov-2002, 06:38 PM
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SCOTCH BROTH
('Scotch' is an acceptable term when talking about food, ie Scotch beef, Scotch eggs, or Scotch Whisky... however, we natives prefer to be called Scots or Scottish )

Traditionally this recipe called for mutton, but that is very fatty and no longer widely available - so use a cheap cut of lamb, eg neck....

1 lb cheap lamb (neck)
1 medium sized swede (diced into reasonable sized chunks)
2 medium onions, sliced
3 large carrots, cut into reasonably chunky slices
3 large leeks, sliced
4 oz dried peas
4 oz pearl barley
2 bay leaves
Ground black pepper and small amount of salt, to taste

Soak the dried peas/barley by covering with water and leaving for a few hours (overnight is easiest). Drain the peas and barley when you are ready to start making the soup.

Put meat into a pan with sufficient water to cover the meat - 2/3 pints (these are Imperial pints, by the way, and I THINK that US pints are different to Imperial ones! and add the bayleaves. Cover and bring slowly up to the boil, then simmer for about an hour. Skim off any fat which floats to the top (keep doing that throughout the cooking time). Add the barley/peas and diced veg and season as required, cover again and simmer for about another hour, until the meat is really tender and the chunky veg and dried peas/barley are tender.

If the broth starts to get too thick, just add a little more water...

Serve with chunky, granary bread - a meal in a bowl!
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monniepoo 
Posted: 11-Mar-2003, 10:09 PM
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Quote (Catriona @ Nov. 26 2002,6:38)
1 medium sized swede (diced into reasonable sized chunks)

What is that?




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Catriona 
Posted: 12-Mar-2003, 04:10 AM
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Some of my American friends tell me that it is like what you call rutabaga?  It's like a turnip, but bigger with a thick skin and is orangey/yellow when cooked.  It has a very distinct flavour and is much used in winter dishes in Scotland, such as stews, casseroles and soups.
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barddas 
Posted: 13-Mar-2003, 04:49 PM
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Catriona

I just wanted to say thank you for posting all of these wonderful recipies. I can't wait to post some m'self. :)

Good food, good music... What more could you ask for....

 Thanks,
Jason


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Catriona 
Posted: 09-Oct-2003, 05:32 AM
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PARTAN BREE
(Gaelic for Crab Soup)

2 large boiled crabs
3 tablespoons long-grain rice (I like to use Basmati)
600ml milk
600ml chicken stock
Half teaspooon anchovy essence or Thai fish sauce
Frehly milled salt and white pepper (to your taste)
300ml cream
Chopped parsley

Remove the meat from the crabs, keep the the claw meat separate. Cook the rice in the milk for around 15 minutes or until it is soft, then add it to the crab meat. Whizz in a liquidiser for 1 minute, or until smooth.

Put into a clean saucepan and gradually stir in the stock over a low heat. Continue to stir as it boils and season to taste after adding the anchovy essence. Lastly add the claw meat, stir until reheated, and swirl some cream into the soup just before serving and sprinkle with fresh parsley.

Serve with crusty granary bread
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Shadows 
Posted: 09-Oct-2003, 09:45 PM
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I have served this one to guest and they asked for seconds.

HAIRST BREE

Hairst Bree is Scots for harvest broth and is part soup and part stew. It is made with lamb, a natural choice in a country where sheep often fair better than cattle and although this may sound unusual to people more accustomed to eating beef or chicken, it is delicious, especially when made with fresh meat and crisp, young vegetables. The vegetables can be substituted if desired; for example, replace the cauliflower with cabbage, and other vegetables may be used instead.


2 lbs neck of lamb chops
1 cauliflower, in flowerlets
2 cups green peas
4 medium carrots, chopped
4 small yellow turnips, chopped
1 cup broad beans
6 spring onions, chopped
1 small lettuce, shredded
2 tsp mint, chopped
1 tbsp parsley, chopped
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp pepper
10 cups water


In a deep pot boil lamb and salt gently in 10 cups water.
Skim any scum from top.
Simmer 1 hour, covered.
Add carrots, onions, beans, turnips and half the peas.
Simmer 1-1/2 hours more, covered.
Add cauliflower, lettuce, peas, mint, sugar, pepper and more salt if required.
Simmer for 1/2 hour or until meat and vegetables are tender and soup is thick.
Stir in parsley just before serving.

Serves 4 - 6.


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MDF3530 
  Posted: 10-Oct-2003, 05:28 PM
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Mmmm tongue.gif !!! These sound good!!!

They're making me even hungrier than I am now & it's still about 1/2 hour till dinner time!!! I would eat something but 1) I don't want to ruin my appetite, & 2) just by looking in the area south of my chest and north of my belt, I won't starve to death anytime soon.


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MDF3530 
  Posted: 10-Oct-2003, 05:35 PM
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QUOTE (Catriona @ Oct 9 2003, 05:32 AM)
Whizz in a liquidiser

Is that your "special" ingredient laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif ???

(sorry, I couldn't resist biggrin.gif )


Mike

tongue.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif
Sheesh, you and your American slang....! We don't use it here, although I've heard it used on US TV shows...

We say to 'whizz' or 'zuzz' in a liquidiser over here.....!!!! - Anyway, you get my drift


WOW...... Mike, I'm sorry.... I hit the 'edit' button instead of the 'quote' and ended up in your original post..... I was SO suprised to see the result of my action

Such is the power given to us Mods...... Mind you, I only found it out by accident! Does it only work in your 'own' areas, or can it be used on other fora? If soooooo....... Naaah, I'm not that petty wink.gif biggrin.gif
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3Ravens 
Posted: 11-Oct-2003, 12:31 AM
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Well Mike, if your soups yellow, I'm not eating it!


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MDF3530 
  Posted: 11-Oct-2003, 06:10 PM
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Nah, it just works in your own forum.
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