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Celtic Radio Community > The Celts > Celtic Art


Posted by: CelticRose 06-Dec-2003, 02:20 PM
As an artist, I have been particularly interested in the genre of Celtic art of all forms. The paintings, jewelry, knotwork, etc. There are many books that can be found through Amazon.com, but I found a few links that had a little of everything that I found interesting. One site even had a few prints to show from the Book of Kells, which is a very rare find as in most cases, as it is not permitted to photograph these beautiful pieces of artwork.


http://www.celtic-art.net

http://www.aon-celtic.com

http://www.stone-circles.org.uk


In my findings on the net, I came across this one site that mentioned that the proper pronounciation of Celtic was Celtic NOT Keltic. I have never heard that before. Is anyone here aware of the true pronounciation of the word? I always thought it pronounced with a C not a K.


Posted by: A Shrule Egan 06-Dec-2003, 02:31 PM
Webster's New World Dictionary

Celt (kelt; also selt) A person who speaks a Celtic language or a descendant of such a person: the Bretons, Irish, Welsh, and Highland Scots are Celts.

Posted by: Keltic 06-Dec-2003, 02:49 PM
QUOTE
One site even had a few prints to show from the Book of Kells, which is a very rare find as in most cases, as it is not permitted to photograph these beautiful pieces of artwork.


Celticrose:

I hope that proving you to be wrong in this assumption makes you happy as an art lover!!

http://www.bookofkells.ie/

Posted by: CelticRose 06-Dec-2003, 04:03 PM
On Keltic! I was hoping you would come and help me out! After I posted the above, I did go back and see some Celtic CD roms you could buy with images of the Book of Kells. Actually, the CD roms are not that expensive, I thought. Would be worth getting, me thinks. I also want to get some books from Amazon.com, but they would be better on the CDs. Anyway, thank you for making me a very happy artist indeed! wink.gif smile.gif thumbs_up.gif

Hi A Shrule Egan! I saw that in my dictionary too and that is why I was suprised to see this guy on the net say it was not to be pronounced Keltic, but Seltic. So I thought I would ask you experts amongst us! Thanks! smile.gif

Posted by: Catriona 06-Dec-2003, 05:32 PM
CelticRose
The use of Seltic or Keltic has become a matter of fashion. When I was young and studying at Uni - Seltic was the preferred pronounciation... but, a little like Scots not liking to be called Scotch nowadays - it ebbs and flows with the decades! In my work circles it is certainly ALWAYS pronounced Keltic nowadays! Oh, except for the Glasgow football team, aka SELTIK and known as The Bhoys!

The Scotch/Scots argument has, in the main, been won! Only foodstuffs eg Scotch beef, Scotch Eggs etc are called SCOTCH.... Even the Americans who are proud of their heritage now refer to themselves as Scots/Irish as opposed to SCOTCH... biggrin.gif

Posted by: CelticRose 06-Dec-2003, 06:01 PM
Oh Catriona! Thank you so much for answering my question. I have noticed here in the states that people will say Scotch and I always try to nicely correct them as I have been taught to say Scots. Now which is correct for an American with Scots ancestry to say? Scots or should they say Scots/Irish? I always get conflicting answers on that one too! Many thanks again! smile.gif

Posted by: Catriona 06-Dec-2003, 06:22 PM
I have an Aunt who lives near San Franciso - her and her husband emigrated when they were first married. They had three children who say they are Americans of Scots ancestry - there is no way they would say either Scotch Irish or Scots Irish - they have two Scots born parents with absolutely no Irish ancestry at all!

Lots of Americans have only Scots ancestry - they do not have ancestors who left Scotland with, say the Plantation... and who later emigrated to many countries, including the USA.... so I would suppose they do not use the word Irish in their description of themselves...

Just to muddy the waters a little more cool.gif


It's interesting, but I conducted a straw poll amongst colleagues and friends. I asked the question 'which country have most Scots emigrated to over the past 150 or so years?'... Most say 1 - Australia and New Zealand, 2- Canada and only third say the USA.... Soooo, although many Americans think that the USA was the primary emigration destination..... the opinion (obviously not a scientific study!) here is different. wink.gif

Posted by: CelticRose 06-Dec-2003, 10:31 PM
Catriona I appreciate you answering all my dumb questions. I have much to learn and want to learn as much about the UK as much as I can. I not only come on here to meet new people and have fun, but to learn as well. So thank you for your patience towards me. Very interesting about the poll you took about the population of people of Scottish ancestry in the different countries. A lot of people I talk to of Scottish ancestry are from Australian, NZ, and Canada. But for some reason I thought Canada had the most Scottish emigrants. Not sure where I got that information from, but it was just in my mind.

And, if I am not hearing people calling themselves Scotch around here, I am hearing Scotch/Irish. So it is interesting to get the real scoop from a Scot, an historian at that! Must be fascinating be a historian! thumbs_up.gif

Gee! I should be talking to you about all this in your forum, but wasn't sure where to post. I have so many questions to ask you and yet don't know where to post them without them not fitting into the topic. Oh well! I'll talk to you wherever I can if you don't mind. smile.gif

Posted by: maggiemahone1 07-Dec-2003, 04:01 PM
CelticRose, I found this site to be most interesting...

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/america/scots_irish.htm.

maggiemahone1

Posted by: CelticRose 07-Dec-2003, 04:52 PM
QUOTE (maggiemahone1 @ Dec 7 2003, 05:01 PM)
CelticRose, I found this site to be most interesting...

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/america/scots_irish.htm.

maggiemahone1

Maggie thank you! I printed the article out to keep with my genealogy records I am working on. The thing I found most personal to me is that my family came from the UK to PA, to the Carolinas and then finally settled in Georgia, just like the article said. Many thanks again! smile.gif

Posted by: balisodare 16-Feb-2004, 03:12 PM
The word "Celtic" came from the Greek word "Keltoi."
It was their word for a non-Greek person.

Therefore, if someone was from a tribe that the Greeks considered "Keltoi"...they were "Keltoic"..or Celtic.

The greeks have no soft vs hard "C." When they used the letter Kappa (K) it meant that they wanted a hard "c" sound (ie..."Kuh")

I'm not sure when it got changed...but as far as I know, the word should be pronounced "Keltic"

Cheers
note.gif

Posted by: Keltic 16-Feb-2004, 10:19 PM
QUOTE (balisodare @ Feb 16 2004, 05:12 PM)
I'm not sure when it got changed...but as far as I know, the word should be pronounced "Keltic"

No argument here

Posted by: barddas 17-Feb-2004, 03:39 PM
This is the way I have ALWAYS read, been taught and heard how to pronounce CELT

If it is refering to a people it is pronounced Celtic with a Hard 'C' like Keltic
And if refering to a sports team it is Celtic with a soft 'c' as in Seltic

Seems we are mostly on the same page.... wink.gif

Posted by: Aon_Daonna 17-Feb-2004, 03:43 PM
I only pronounce the football club with a c.. In German they are called "Kelten" so for me that's more like the right pronunciation.

Posted by: greenldydragon 13-Jun-2004, 08:17 PM
Beautiful peices of art..

Posted by: KelticFaeryMagick 19-Jun-2004, 06:31 PM
This is just a test to see if it's working...

Oh, btw to those who were referring what they should call themselves, I just say that I'm Celtic. tongue.gif


Posted by: bubba 19-Sep-2004, 07:41 PM
QUOTE (CelticRose @ 06-Dec-2003, 07:01 PM)
I have noticed here in the states that people will say Scotch and I always try to nicely correct them as I have been taught to say Scots.

I've been asked if I'm Scotch, since I wear kilts, fairly often. I usually say "No, I'm not an alcoholic beverage.

Posted by: celticwoodsman 20-Sep-2004, 08:22 AM
On the topic of art and celtic knotwork...or for those who bicker about the word celt....rather than "classical art found in the areas now known as Ireland and Scotland, that has an interlocking pattern of lines typically attributed to those with the label of celtic tribes and clans."

I am interested in designing a tatoo of a celtic cross, usually found in body modification they are typically located on outer arms or legs of an individual. I wish to have a celtic cross tatoo on my back. This would be an expensive piece due to the size and rough complexity of the artwork. I would like the tatoo to go from shoulderblade to shoulderblade and from my first thorasic veribrae to the lower lumbar....roughly 19 inches long by 14 inches wide. If anyone has ideas or suggestions I would greatly appreciate it.

Posted by: Shamalama 21-Sep-2004, 01:32 PM
QUOTE (CelticRose @ 07-Dec-2003, 06:52 PM)

The thing I found most personal to me is that my family came from the UK to PA, to the Carolinas and then finally settled in Georgia...


That's the same thing that happened to my family, the McCullough's. There were apparently a great number of Irish and Scots (and my group, the Ulster Scots) that came into America the same way, following the "frontier" as it moved down the Appalachians, finally stopping in north central Georgia. Seems we've been neighbors for a couple of hundred years, Sister CelticRose. smile.gif


Posted by: CelticRose 21-Sep-2004, 03:44 PM
Yeah, Shamalama! You and I could be related! It is afterall a small world! My mother was born and raised in Georgia and I lived there myself for 14 years. Still have lots of family back there.............two sisters included! smile.gif My ancestors were Quakers who eventually became Baptists though. What about your family?

Celticwoodsman! That is some Celtic cross you are going to have. did you look up on the net for Celtic crosses for some ideas?. I have seen some real beauties!

Posted by: celticwoodsman 27-Sep-2004, 08:15 AM
celtic rose,
I have seen a few old 14th century ones that I like but it has to be drwan out obviously, and I just don't really know how complicated I can have it, though I dont want 4 simple lovers knots either. I just wanted to pick the brains out there for ideas from artists. I mean the best canvas is the body I think, but I don't want to copy anothers art, I want it to be unique, as well as with some traditional knots.

As I said, just wanted to see if there were any suggestions, I have combed the internet, and some old latin texts...I have a lot of pictures, just not enough skill right now to sketch it out.

Posted by: CelticRose 27-Sep-2004, 04:44 PM
Celticwoodsman! There are some really nice ones on Amazon.com. You could get some ideas there and then hire our very own jewelry maker here, Keltic, to design and make you the one you want. Just a suggestion! smile.gif

Posted by: Balachasen 02-Oct-2004, 07:58 AM
Maideann Mhath,
I think Seltic pronunciation is fashion and Keltic is more true to the Gaelic -
Ceilteach. I heard Keltoi was the original tribe that from Northern Eastern Europe (Finland, Ukraine, Belorussia etc)
Therefore the pronunciation might best be Keltic, after those people.

Slainte mhath,

Balachasen

Posted by: Balachasen 02-Oct-2004, 08:12 AM

Hallo!
Im from NZ, and leaving Caucasses and Germanic blood aside although I'd love to think i've got Irish and Welsh and Cornish ancestry in fact they are predominantly Scottish, with some English, at least within my recent ancestors.

Here's a wee question?
Does anyone know much about the midlands english and the settlement of staffordshire....my Grandmothers maiden name was Gadd and it goes back to the 15th century but may have been changed from Jones.
Any ideas??

Slainte,
Balachasen

Posted by: MelissaDawn7 28-May-2014, 07:42 PM
I love Celtic artwork! I am planning on getting a Celtic motherhood knot tattoo soon smile.gif

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