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> Ex-Marine Fends Off Lion With Chainsaw
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Rindy 
Posted: 18-Jul-2009, 06:56 PM
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This isn't something you hear every day. To think there was one within a block of my home not to long ago. We were warned and to keep any eye out and on our pets. It's true though they don't usually attack humans.

Slainte

Ex-Marine fends off lion with chainsaw

CODY, Wyoming - Wielding his chain saw as a weapon, a former U.S. Marine says he fought off a starving mountain lion that attacked him while he was camping with his wife and two toddlers in northwestern Wyoming.

Dustin Britton, a 32-year-old mechanic and ex-Marine, said he was alone cutting firewood about 100 feet from his campsite in the Shoshone National Forest when he saw the lion staring at him from some bushes.

Britton revved his 18-inch chain saw and tried to back away. But the 100-pound lion followed.

As the animal pounced, Britton raised his saw and met it head-on — a collision he said felt like a grown man running right into him.

"It batted me three or four times with its front paws and as quick as I hit it with that saw it just turned away," he said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press.

Britton later discovered he'd inflicted a gash on the lion's shoulder. He said he was surprised the damage wasn't worse.

"You would think if you hit an animal with a chain saw it would dig right in. I might as well have hit it with a hockey stick," he said.

The wounded animal retreated, leaving Britton with a only small puncture wound on his forearm.

The attack occurred Sunday evening. Wildlife agents shot and killed the lion Monday after it attacked a dog brought in to track the animal.

Authorities say the lion was in poor physical condition and appeared to be starving. The lion was 4 to 5 years old.

Mountain lions are considered reclusive by nature and officials said the circumstances of the attack were highly unusual. Wyoming officials have documented only eight cases of mountain lions acting aggressively toward humans over the last decade.
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Patch 
Posted: 19-Jul-2009, 01:03 AM
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I would be more concerned with a mountain lion than a bear. My brother (a vet) had one that had an intestinal ailment from birth. It was under sized but not thin and had to eat special food. A lady in his area raised them and this one, being imperfect was not saleable. She was going to have it put to sleep and my brother thought maybe he could find a home for it in a zoo. He couldn't and it eventually died a natural death. He said that though it was caged, it was better than a watch dog!

It is possible that this one had something similar or it could have tangled with a large animal, an Elk or Buffalo and been injured internally. Maybe it had internal parasites. They should know soon. When we invade the territory of large carnivores, we need to use caution and be prepared. Were it not for the chain saw, the outcome could have been different.

Slàinte,     

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Rindy 
Posted: 19-Jul-2009, 11:25 AM
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So true Patch. I thought it was a unusual piece of news. I wouldn't want to mess with either lion or bear. I've not seen a wild lion but have seen bears. Awesome scary feeling. I am glad the man had a weapon. As you say it would of been different if he wouldn't of had it.

Slainte
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Patch 
Posted: 19-Jul-2009, 12:29 PM
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Cats can have you before you know they are nearby. California has had feline attacks and may still be having them.

The one my brother had weighed about 85 lb with the digestive problem and an average healthy female would weigh over 115 lb. When you watch them they are spooky. For their size they are quick and silent.

In the early 60's Colorado had bounties on lions. The state paid $75.00 and the ranchers association paid an additional $50.00 if I remember correctly. Initially sightings were common but after 8 or 10 years, to see a cat in the wild, you had to spend a lot of time in the "high country." The bounties are now gone and Colorado has a huntable population.

California's problem is that they are protected and the population has exceeded the habitat. Hunger sets in and they add us to their food chain. No unarmed human is a match for even an 85 pound cat. They are very efficient killing machines and have been known to kill a 600 lb plus elk under the right circumstances.

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Rindy 
Posted: 19-Jul-2009, 01:51 PM
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I agree with you Patch they are sneaky and fast. A lot of hunting is done around here and some of the best dogs have been lost to lions. Bears as well. A grizzly can come out of no where on a dead run and have you before you know it as well. Many of horses have been lost as well. Wouldn't want to deal with either of them.

Ranchers will still request help from lion hunters who have dogs if the lion has been a problem on the Ranch.

Sounds like your brother had a large cat. . I think they can weigh up to 165 lbs. A small house cat can scare me.lol. when they do that bad meow...and hiss. Thanks for posting this information Patch very interesting.

Slainte
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Faerydreamer 
Posted: 21-Jul-2009, 09:36 PM
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Cats have quick and sneaky ways of attacking. I had a kitten when my son was about a year old. I gave him a bath and sent him into his room to get a diaper. The cat was napping on my son's pillow on his captains bed with drawers under it. When my son got to the bed, the cat reached out without provocation and slashed him from one side of his groin to the other. Fortunately, (men stop going OOOOOWWWWW) it was above the precious parts but for him it was scary.

That was the last cat in my home. I will not have them. I prefer my feathered pets.


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Rindy 
Posted: 26-Jul-2009, 02:20 PM
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Ok, here we go again..lol..Faerydreamer I think that's terrible what that cat did to your son. I would of done exactly what you did. Ilm glad he was alright.

As we've been talking about lions and bears this just happened to be in the newspaper. This was a small grizzly. Cubs must of been taking it out of her seeing she was only 275 lbs.
I give my respects to the bear. Slainte


Retired Police Officer Recounts Bear Mauling

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David Grubbs

Jerry Ruth of Clark, Wyo., used hand gestures Friday, July 24, 2009 to describe how a Grizzly bear attacked him near his home. Ruth surprised the bear and her three cubs when she attacked. The bear first bit Ruth in the face, breaking his jaw in serveral places. Ruth, a retired police officer, grabbed a pistol he was carrying, fired three shots and killed the bear. Ruth sustained bite wounds, a punctured lung and other injuries in the attack. Ruth 51, had to described his ordeal on paper because he could not talk.



The cubs - two males and a female - were brought to the Billings zoo on Wednesday by officials with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department after their mother was killed Sunday in Northern Wyoming. The bear was killed by Jerry Ruth, who was mauled before he was able to shoot the bear. Ruth is being treated for his injuries at St. Vincent Healthcare in Billings.

The encounter happened near Clark, Wyo., while Ruth and another man came across the bears in foothills outside the small town north of Cody. Wyoming game officials captured the cubs shortly after the incident.

Jackie Worstell, executive director of ZooMontana, said the 2-month-old cubs were kept in the zoo's grizzly bear exhibit. Wyoming officials asked to temporarily place the bears at the zoo while waiting for the Memphis Zoo to obtain the necessary permits to bring the anim

Full StoryJerry Ruth saw the grizzly for just a fraction of a second before it was on him.

Within seconds, the 275-pound animal had crushed the Wyoming man's jaw when it bit him in the face, fractured his rib and punctured his lung and left deep bite wounds in his calf and scratches across his back.

After the attack, the bear left him for her three cubs that Ruth saw for the first time as he lay bleeding on the dirt. When it reached the cubs about 15 yards away, the bear turned toward him again, "squaring off" as if to charge, Ruth recalled Friday.

Ruth grabbed for the .41-caliber magnum revolver he was carrying in a hip holster and relied on his training and experience as a police officer to save his life. He fired three times, saving three bullets in case his first shots failed.

But the bear dropped and didn't move, ending the furious encounter as swiftly as it started.

"My training as a cop (is) that when deadly force is used against you, you use deadly force to repel the deadly force," Ruth said.

Ruth, 51, remains at St. Vincent Healthcare in Billings since the attack Sunday near his home in Clark, Wyo., a small town north of Cody near the Montana state line. Because his jaw is wired shut to heal the multiple fractures, Ruth used a pencil and notebook on Friday to describe his encounter with the bear. His wife, Cindy, has stayed near him as doctors continue to treat him.

One of his treating physicians, Dr. Jeff Rentz, said Ruth's injuries were very serious. The bear bite crushed his jaw on the left side in several places and broke the right side of the bone. The jaw has been wired shut and plates fastened to the bone to hold it while it heals, he said.

Rentz said it appears that the bear hit Ruth in the back, causing the fractured rib and punctured lung. Two of the bite marks in Ruth's calf were large enough to insert a thumb, Rentz said.

"We were concerned about his survival when he got here," the doctor said.

Ruth will require at least one more surgery, and his doctors said it was still unclear when he might be able to return home. Dr. Andy Boyce, an oral surgeon who worked on Ruth, said the jaw will have to remain wired for about six more weeks.

Cindy and Jerry Ruth moved to Wyoming last year after Ruth retired from the Baltimore County Police Department in Maryland after a 28-year career as an officer. They bought property in Clark about a decade ago after falling in love with the area while on vacation, Cindy Ruth said. Her husband spent a month every summer working on their retirement home, she said.

On Sunday, Jerry Ruth and a friend took their four-wheelers for a ride onto an adjacent ranch to look for a herd of elk that Cindy had seen the day before. The two men were hoping to catch a glimpse of the elk, and maybe find a few antler sheds.

They were about a mile from Ruth's house when the men parked the four-wheelers and began walking into a small valley toward a pond through sage brush. Ruth's friend was ahead of him, Ruth said, and the men were 25 to 75 yards apart. Some of the sage brush was as tall as a man.

Ruth said he caught only a glimpse of the bear before the attack.

"Like a flash the bear came out from under some sage brush and she was on me," Ruth wrote. "Grabbed my lower face in her jaw and I could hear the bones breaking."

Ruth said thoughts of his family came to his mind as the bear attacked. The couple has three adult children.

"I next became aware that she was off of me," Ruth wrote. "I was on the ground. She was squaring off to take another charge. It was at this time that (I saw) she had three cubs."

After the initial attack, Ruth said, he was able to grab his pistol and fire three times at the bear, and the bear dropped dead. Ruth began calling for help, and his friend arrived within moments.

The men called Ruth's wife on a cell phone so she could call 911 and meet them with a vehicle. They were only about a mile and a half from the Ruth's house, and they began making their way back on the four-wheelers as Ruth held on to his friend.

Cindy Ruth said was shocked at her husband's injuries.

"I just started praying," she said. "I didn't know how he was going to survive it. It was the scariest thing I've ever seen."

With the help of emergency medical crews, Jerry Ruth got to the hospital in Powell and then was flown to the hospital in Billings. Rentz said a team of St. Vincent physicians took him immediately into surgery.

Ruth said he carries his revolver with him anytime he goes into the backcountry around his house. The habit probably saved her husband's life, Cindy Ruth said. In such a sudden attack, she said, bear spray probably would not have been effective against the mother bear.

"I think the only way we are not at a funeral right now is because he had his gun," she said.

Ruth said he regrets having to shoot the bear, and suggests that people be aware of all wildlife when they venture out.

"I feel bad for killing the bear," he wrote. "I think it was just a matter of time (before) this bear would have gone after someone else."
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snuffy macsmiff 
Posted: 11-Aug-2009, 03:42 AM
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'round these parts it ain't bears(tho there are a few black bears) or cats you have to watch out for

but HOGS!!!

Heya Sweet Rindy! How ya been? Loooong time no see(I'll try to do better!)

check this out:


Physician attacked by wild hog
By Elizabeth Billips [email protected]


It was his last cartridge and his last hope.

The 192-pound wild boar had already gored Dr. Joseph "Larry" Jackson Sr. twice and had him right where it wanted him.

It had all happened in a whirlwind ... the quick tremble of leaves in the thicket, the scrape of tusks and teeth against his rifle. Dr. Jackson slid the cartridge into the magazine, knowing a movement too quick would probably be his last. Blood was already puddling around him.

The hog locked its eyes on the downed physician and lowered its head to strike again.

The Fourth of July had actually started off nicely for the 64-year-old Waynesboro physician. It was just after sunrise when he and hunting buddy J.R. Rountree spotted the big black hog inside a pasture at Old Town Plantation in Jefferson County.

Dr. Jackson took a shot and heard the bullet hit tough hide. But it missed its mark by an inch, and the hog ran off along the fence line and out of sight. Rountree went back for the truck while Dr. Jackson took off through the pasture on foot.

The hog hunkered down in a thicket no bigger than a compact car, and when the doctor came into sight, it charged.

"I fired from my hip and just missed," Dr. Jackson recalls from the leather recliner in his living room. "He took my feet out from under me and was on top of me."

The hog backed off and charged again, this time burying a tusk in the doctor's arm. He used his Remington as a club and managed to hold back the hog's head as it drove into him again and again. A pair of binoculars blocked a blow to his gut. "These saved me from having my belly ripped open," he says, running a finger along deep scrapes above the lenses.

When the hog backed off again, he knew it was his last chance.

"I didn't want to make any quick, sudden motions," Dr. Jack- son explains, remembering how the hog stared straight at him as he reloaded his rifle and eased the barrel around. As the boar lowered his head to attack again, he squeezed a pointblank shot into its chest. "I never felt any pain, and I was never afraid," he says. "I was just trying to fight for my life."

As the boar went down, the doctor realized how badly he was hurt. "I could see I was spurting blood so I knew I had a problem," he recalls. He used his good hand to keep pressure on the gash until Rountree arrived with the truck. "I lost three pints right there on the ground … another three minutes and I would have been dead."

His friend had heard the shots but didn't suspect trouble until he rounded the bend. "JR knew something was wrong then," Dr. Jackson says, noting the whole attack was over and done within minutes. "He said he'd never seen a hunter and hog on the ground at the same time."

Rountree rushed Dr. Jackson to the emergency room in Jefferson County where they learned the hog's tusk had severed the artery in his arm and sliced through three tendons. Unbeknownst to the doctor, the boar's tusk had also pushed through his boot and severed his calf muscle. "It looked like a cherry bomb went off in there," he says, glancing at his thickly bandaged leg. It took orthopedic and vascular surgeons at University Hospital in Augusta nearly four hours to repair the damage and close up the jagged wounds.

Dr. Jackson hobbles to his gun safe and pulls out his trusted Remington. "It was a hell of a fight … a fight to the death," he says, pointing to the bite marks and scratches along the barrel. "One of us wasn't coming out of there alive."

He returns to his recliner, sporting a deep tan and athletic shorts. He looks himself, despite the cuts and lumps and the perfect purple hoof mark imprinted in his thigh.

He says Rountree returned for the hog and will soon deliver packages of bacon, sausage and cubed steak. There will be a skull mount arriving soon too, complete with the razor teeth and four-inch tusks that came so close to taking his life.

Dr. Jackson points up the wall where it will likely hang, recalling the flash of black and the white stripe across the boar's shoulder. "I will always remember that pink eye staring right at me," he says.

http://www.thetruecitizen.com/news/2009/07...t_page/002.html

I'd say the doc is a very lucky man.

This happened about a hundred miles east of me. When I first moved down here six years ago the area was infested with wild or feral hogs. A friend got me into hunting them tho I actually shot several here in my own yard! They were walking up in broad daylight and eating my pecans-GRRRR!
One instance I'll never forget happened late one night whilst he and I were hunting. I, for some reason(like a a dumb@ss) had decided to walk around a bit. I slowly walked down along a hedgerow to the end and stopped. I was hoping to see one feeding as it was a rather moonlit night. Oh, FWIW it's been legal to hunt hogs at night here for some time. They have gotten so bad that the state DNR is now allowing them to be hunted day or night, all year round, lights are allowed and you can even hunt them over bait! Anyway, I stood there for a bit and after seeing nothing I started to walk back to the camp. About halfway back all of a sudden a hog shot out of the hedgerow running at full tilt about 15 feet behind me! Scared me so bad I wasn't even able to raise my rifle and shoot at it before it made it across the small open field and into the woods.
That was close enough. From that point on you better believe I stayed either in the stand or in camp at night!



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Monarchs Own 
Posted: 11-Aug-2009, 07:05 AM
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Yes wild hogs are pretty dangerous. Here in Germany they have loads of trouble the last few years. They are breaking into your basements and destroy everything. More often then not they have to call in local hunters / forest masters to shoot them because they can't catch them to free them and often the rescuers are attacked.

I guess it's the same as in a lot of parts everywhere. We are moving into their habitat.



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Rindy 
Posted: 14-Aug-2009, 01:35 PM
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Hiya snuffy! It's so good to see you. Hope to see you more often. What a time this man had. He is lucky to have survived this one. That's one big hog!! 192 lbs wow. He's luck to have a rifle.

I had sort of heard wild hogs were mean but had no idea it was this bad.

Monarchs Own, I didn't realize they break in and are so destructive as well.

I agree with both of you. Another animal to put on the dangerous list.

Thanks for posting.

Slainte
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