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Herrerano 
Posted: 20-Dec-2003, 10:33 AM
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ZodiacIvy

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If your idea of latin food is a taco from Taco Bell, well, sorry. Here is the place to record those real, verdadero recetas.


Leo


--------------------

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Ita erat quando hic adveni.

Time is a great teacher, but unfortunatley it kills all its pupils. - Hector Berlioz

"No matter where you go, there you are." - R. Young




¡Visté! ¡Te lo dijé!
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Herrerano 
Posted: 20-Dec-2003, 10:52 AM
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Patacones are green plantain fried like 'chips', usually served with any number of different dishes like camarones en salsa or alone like a snack or appetizer at family gatherings.

Green plantain
cooking oil
salt
garlic powder (optional)

To make patacones you need to select a green plantain, peel it and then slice it into round slices about a quarter of an inch thick.

Heat about a half inch to an inch of oil in a heavy skillet and when the oil is hot place the sliced plantain carefully in the hot oil in a single layer. Leave room to be able to turn easily with a spatula.

When both sides are a nice golden brown, remove from the hot oil and place on a chopping block or other suitable surface, then with a small round heavy object (you could use a small cup or something, although in our house we have a couple of small smooth river rocks as cooking implements) smash each of the fried pieces of plantain exactly in the center to make the edges sort of open up and the soft inner part kind of 'flower' out. Then carefully replace in the hot oil and fry quickly until the newly exposed part has browned.

Drain on paper towels, salt al gusto then eat with glee.


A variation on this is to mix garlic powder and salt in a little water, then when the slices have been smashed dip them in that mixture before refrying. Careful though, they spatter.


Leo
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Shadows 
Posted: 21-Dec-2003, 10:33 AM
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I got this one from a friend in Mexico, it is cooked in a crockpot so I am sure it is not a traditional method of cooking , but any slow , low heat cooking will yield the same effect.



Recipe Name: SLOW COOKER MEXICAN STYLE MEAT
Category: MEXICAN
Serves: 5

4 pounds chuck roast
1 teaspo salt
1 teaspo ground black pepper
2 tables olive oil
1 onion chopped
2/3 cups diced green chile pepper, jalopena
1 teaspo chili powder
1 teaspo ground cayenne pepper
1/2 cup hot pepper sauce
3 Clove garlic, chopped
1/2 Tsp. cumin
water as needed

This recipe can be used with chicken, beef, pork and even venison. It freezes well and can be made into burritos, tacos, or any number of other Mexican-style dishes. This dish uses a lot of spice, so please be sure to adjust to your taste.

1. Trim the roast of any excess fat and season with the salt and pepper. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat, then sear the meat on all sides.
2. Transfer the roast to a slow cooker. Add the onion, chile peppers, chili powder, cayenne pepper, hot pepper sauce and garlic powder. Add enough water to cover 1/3 of the roast.
3. Cover slow cooker and cook on high setting for 6 hours, checking to make sure there is always at least a small amount of liquid in the bottom.
4. Reduce heat to low setting for 2 to 4 hours, or until meat is totally tender and falls apart. Reserve any remaining liquid for a sauce and thicken, if desired.


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I support the separation of church and hate!

IMAGINATION - the freest and largest nation in the world!


One can not profess to be of "GOD" and show intolerence and prejudice towards the beliefs of others.

Am fear nach gleidh na h–airm san t–sith, cha bhi iad aige ’n am a’ chogaidh.
He that keeps not his arms in time of peace will have none in time of war.

"We're all in this together , in the parking lot between faith and fear" ... O.C.M.S.

“Beasts feed; man eats; only the man of intellect knows how to eat well.”

"Without food we are nothing, without history we are lost." - SHADOWS


Is iomadh duine laghach a mhill an Creideamh.
Religion has spoiled many a good man.

The clan MacEwen
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Shadows 
Posted: 30-Dec-2003, 02:30 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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Recipe Name: CUBAN-STYLE POT ROAST
Category: BEEF
Serves: 6

1/4 pound Chorizo sausage
2 tables Oil
3 pound Chuck roast
1/2 cup Flour
3/4 cup Tomato sauce
1/2 cup Water
1 Tables Oregano
1 Bay leaf
2 teaspo Garlic minced
1/4 cup Green olives chopped

Remove the chorizo from the casing. Place in a large, heavy pot (that has a lid). Cook until browned. Spoon out the meat and reserve. Add the oil to the pan and heat. Dredge the roast in the flour. Add to the pot and brown on both sides. Add the remaining ingredients. Return the sausage to the pot. Cover and bake at 325 for 2 1/2 hours (or until the beef is very tender). Serve warm.

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Shadows 
Posted: 30-Dec-2003, 02:42 PM
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This one is from a friend and co-worker that was born and raised in Southern Mexico:

Recipe Name: ADOBO
Category: MEXICAN
Serves: 1

8 Each Cloves of Garlic, unpeeled
4 Each Dried chiles Anchos
-stemmed,seeded,deveined
-about 2 ounces
6 Each Dried chiles Guajillos
-stemmed,seeded,deveined
-about 1 1/2 ounces
1/2 Each Inch stick cinnamon
-about 1/2 t ground
1 Each Clove, or a pinch ground
10 Each Black peppercorns
-scant 1/4 t ground
2 lg Bay Leaves broken up
1/8 ts Cumin seed, or 1/8 t ground
1/2 ts Dried Oregano
1/2 ts Dried Thyme
1 1/2 ts Salt
1/4 Cup Cider vinegar


Toasting the chiles and garlic. Roast the garlic
cloves on a griddle or heavy skillet over medium heat,
turning frequently, until blackened in spots and VERY
soft, about 15 minutes. Remove, cool, skin and roughly
chop.
While the garlic is roasting, tear the chiles into
flat pieces and toast them a few at a time: Use a
metal spatula to press them firmly against the hot
surface for a few seconds, until they blister, crackle
and change color, then flip them over and press them
flat to toast the other side.
Soaking the dried chiles. Break the chiles into a
small bowl, cover with boiling water, weight with a
plate to keep submerged and soak 30 minutes. Drain,
tear into smaller pieces, place in a blender jar and
add the garlic.
Finishing the Adobo. In a mortar or spice grinder,
pulverize the cinnamon, cloves, peppercorns, bay
leaves and cumin. Add the chiles along with the
oregano, thyme, salt, vinegar and 3 Tb water. With a
long series of blender pulses, reduce the mixture to a
paste. Run the blender for a few seconds until the
mixture clogs, then scrape down the sides with a
spatula and stir; repeat a dozen times or more until
the mixture is smooth. Don't add water unless
absolutely necessary or this marinating paste won't do
its job well. Strain the paste through a medium-mesh
sieve into a noncorrosive container with a
tight-fitting lid. Cover and refrigerate.
Considerations: After soaking the chiles, they can be
put through a foley food mill to remove the skins and
the seeds. Add this puree along with the garlic to the
small blender jar and proceed. If this is done, and
the mixture is put together in a small blender jar,
and pulsed, scraped down, and mixed very well the
final sieving can be eliminated.
All of the chiles can be Ancho or Guajillo. You can
substitute 3 1/2 ounces of California or New Mexican
chiles for the above chiles but the flavor will be
light.
Adobo with powdered chiles: For a darker, stronger
tasting adobo made without the tedious series of
blender runs, roast the chiles and garlic as directed
above, then pulverize the chiles with the
cinnamon,cloves,pepper, bay leaves and cumin in
several batches in a spice grinder; sift through a
medium-mesh sieve. Skin the garlic and mash it to a
smooth paste. Mix with the powdered chile mixture,
oregano, thyme, salt, vinegar and 6 Tb water. Store as
directed above.



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Herrerano 
Posted: 30-Dec-2003, 08:36 PM
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.

Changa

Ingredientes:
6 Mazorcas tiernas
1 Cucharada de azúcar
1/2 Cucharada de sal
2 Cucharadas de queso del país
Hojas de plátano
Procedimiento:
Desgrane las mazorcas y muélanse en la máquina o procesador de
alimentos, añádase el azúcar, la sal y el queso y mezclar bien. En
una casuela, sobre las hojas de plátano, viértase el maíz redondeando
un poco, cúbrase con otra hoja y póngase a fuego lento; cuando este
cocido se vira y se sigue cocinando hasta que este todo cocido por
ambos lados.

FROM: Al Estílo Cuquíta http://www.tvn-2.com/cuquita.htm

----------------------------------
A non-literal translation by yours truly

6 ears of sweet corn

1 spoon sugar

1/2 spoon salt

2 spoons white cheese (like farmers cheese sort of only fresh; by the way, cheese
is an optional ingredient and is not used in my neck of the woods.)

banana leaves

Cut the grain from the ears of corn, and grind in a hand grinder. Add
the sugar, salt and cheese and mix well. On a griddle put the banana
leaves then dump the corn mixture over the leaves and form into a
flat round cake about 1/2 inch thick. Put the griddle over a low
flame and cook and turn to cook the other side, continue until done.

(these should be firm, and cooked through without any runny stuff
inside. It's normal for the outside to pick up pieces of blackened
banana leaf as the leaf starts to burn slightly, this adds the
special changa flavor)


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Herrerano 
Posted: 30-Dec-2003, 09:34 PM
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Bistec picada
(Panama style)

1 - 2 lbs. beef (this can be cut off a roast, which would be more the style down here, or round steak, or any other suitable cut of beef. By the way, most beef eaten here is range cattle, almost all Brahma so it usually has a somewhat stronger taste then Angus) Beef should be cut in small pieces, very thin about an inch long

1 or 2 medium sized onions, cut in thin rings

1 or 2 small tomatoes, chopped, but not too finely

1 six ounce can of tomato sauce (for realism should be Maggi tomato sauce)

1 small green, sweet pepper

2 or 3 small culantro leaves smashed

3 or 4 cloves of garlic, well pulverized

Soy sauce and salt to taste

In a skillet with a small amount of oil, over very high heat, brown the beef strips, put in the onion, pepper and tomato and cook until the onion is translucent, add the garlic and culantro. Add the soy sauce (a few dashes) and tomato sauce then cook about ten minutes.

This is usually eaten with changa for breakfast, or served with rice for lunch or dinner. Great breakfast with a couple of fried eggs and a thick piece of changa with a slice of white cheese and a cup of real coffee with milk and sugar.

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Herrerano 
Posted: 30-Dec-2003, 10:45 PM
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Ceviche de Camarones
(Shrimp ceviche)

3 lbs small shrimp (about 1/2" shrimp work best)
1 cup of lemon juice
1 tblsp salt
1 cup of finely chopped onion
1 aji chombo (hot pepper, preferably scotch bonnet or habañero) finely chopped
1 or 2 culantro leaves, smashed and finely chopped

Peel and clean the shrimp. Boil water with salt, then place shrimp in a colander and dip repeatedly into the water until they turn a pink color, but do not overcook. Rinse in cold water then place in a glass bowl. Add the other ingredientes, stir well then cover with plastic or aluminum foil and refrigerate at least six hours.

Serve in small portions with saltines as an appetizer, or to accompany an ice cold beer.

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RavenWing 
Posted: 08-Jan-2004, 09:02 PM
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Arroz con Pollo

4 chicken thighs
salt and pepper
1 med onion
2 cloves of garlic chopped
olive oil
1 cup rice
2 small cans chopped tomatoes
1 can chicken stock

Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper and brown in olive out (do not cook thoroughly yet) Remove chicken and set aside. Sautee celery onion and garlic intil the onions soften. Sprinkle rice and coat in oil. Add tomatoes and chicken stock then chicken and simmer for 30 minutes.


This recipe doesn't call for any peppers with heat, but I will add a jalapeno sometimes.






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Religion is for those who are afraid of going to Hell. Spirituality is for those who have already been there.
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Shadows 
Posted: 11-Jan-2004, 06:11 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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This might not be authentic as far as region goes, but my 11 year old daughter made this ( with my help ) tonite and it is good! Kinda like a south of the border stroganoff!

Recipe Name: GROUND BEEF MEXICAN STYLE
Category: BEEF
Serves: 4

Prep Time: approx. 10
Minutes.
Cook Time: approx. 30 Minutes.
Ready in: approx. 40
--------------------------------------------------
1 pound ground beef
1 cup salsa ( medium to hot ) or more to taste
1/2 cup water or
beef boullion
1 green bell pepper chopped
1 bunch green onions chopped or
1 yellow onion chopped
1 (8 ounce) package wide egg noodles
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese or Jack cheese
2 clove of garlic crushed
1 tomato chopped optional
1 hot pepper pod ( dried smoked )
2 tbls taco mix

1 In a large nonstick skillet, cook and stir ground beef
until browned. Drain off excess fat. Stir in green pepper and onions, garlic and continue simmering until veggies are crisp/tender.

2 Stir in salsa, taco mix and water or boullion. Add pepper pod; Simmer for 10 minutes.

3 Meanwhile, cook pasta in boiling water until al dente. Drain.

4 Stir in noodles and sour cream. Sprinkle grated cheese on top, and cover pan until the cheese melts. Sprinkle chopped tomatoes on the top, and serve.
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Herrerano 
Posted: 20-Jan-2004, 06:37 PM
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Carne Asada Panameña


A few pounds of beef roast probably top round, sliced about a quarter of an inch thick and about six inches long and two to three inches wide.

Marinate in soy sauce, crushed garlic, salt, achiote (annatto), crushed and finely chopped culantro, lemon juice (optional).

Cook over very hot coals until well done.

This is the sort of thing one might buy from a street vendor at any sort of festival. It is also normaly the way beef is fixed at a matanza, usually a big party where a cow is slaughtered and all of the meat is cooked as above. These usually last until the sun comes up.

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Herrerano 
Posted: 20-Jan-2004, 06:45 PM
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I guess it is time to mention ingredients briefly. One of the primary ingredients in most Central American food is culantro. This is not the same as cilantro, although the taste is somewhat similar, but stronger. If you can not get culantro then cilantro could be substituted.

Here are a couple of URLs that explain what each one is.

Culantro

Cilantro


A couple of other commonly used ingredients are the following.

Achiote, is the seed of the annatto, it is heated in cooking oil to extract the red color and flavor, then the oil is added to the dish, not the seeds.

Yuca is the root of the cassava, cannot be eaten raw but is usually boiled before any other cooking method is used.


Leo

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Herrerano 
Posted: 08-May-2004, 03:18 PM
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SALVADORAN PUPUSAS WITH CURTIDO

CURTIDO (PICKLED CABBAGE)
1 medium cabbage, shredded
2 carrots, shredded
1 small red onion, sliced thin
4 cups cider vinegar
4 cups water
1 tablespoon dried oregano leaves, crushed
2 teaspoons crushed red chile flakes
1 red bell pepper or 4 ajies dulces (sweet red peppers), sliced thin
1 tablespoon salt

PORK AND POTATO FILLING
3 pounds pork butt, trimmed and cut
into small pieces
1 teaspoon salt
1 pound tomatoes (about 3 medium)
1/2 small white onion, sliced
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
1/4 teaspoon gound black pepper
3 whole cloves
1 large russet

CORN DOUGH
4 pounds masa (freshly ground corn dough) 1 cup vegetable oil

1. Preparing the curtido: In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrots, onion, vinegar, water, oregano, chile flakes, red bell pepper, and salt until well mixed. Trasfer to a glass or plastic 1-gallon jar. Secure with the lid and agitate to mix well. Let marinate at least 1 day. Makes 1 gallon. This mixture will keep up to 1 month in the refrigerator.

2. Preparing meat for filling: In a small pot, combine the pork with water to cover by 2 inches and salt to season. Bring to a rapid simmer. Partially cover and cook until the pork is tender and the water has almost evaporated, about 40 minutes. Uncover; reduce the heat to very low and let the pork fry in its own fat until golden. Remove from the heat.

3. Simmering the filling: Put the tomatoes, onion, oregano, black pepper, and cloves in a blender container. Puree until smooth. Pour the blender contents into the saucepan with the pork. Place over medium heat, stirring the puree with a wooden spoon to loosen bits of browned pork on the bottom of the pot. Remove from the heat and, using 2 forks, shred the meat. Bring the mixture to a boil again. Lower the heat and cook uncover over medium heat for 10 minutes, or until thickened.

4. Finishing the filling: Place the potato in a small pot with water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook until tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Remove from the heat, drain, and peel. Mash the potato or press it through a sieve. In a bowl, combine the pork mixture with 1/2 to 3/4 cup of the mashed potato; mix thoroughly. Makes about 4 cups filling.


5. Forming and cooking pupusas: Mix the masa with the oil until very soft. Form into 25 small balls and cover with a damp cloth. Pat each ball with the palms of your hand until flattened. Place a generous tablespoon of meat mixture in the center of each round. Carefully enclose the filling by pressing the edges of the masa up over the filling. Press the edges of masa together to seal the ball. Lightly pat the masa ball (with enclosed filling) until flattened to 3/8-inch thickness. Place the pupusas on a heated greased grilled; cook until speckled brown. Turn once and continue coocking until speckled and puffed. Remove; top with curtido and serve.




Serve hot, topped with curtido.
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Roisin-Teagan 
Posted: 08-May-2004, 06:47 PM
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Here is a recipe I learned from my ex-mother-in-law:

"Green Chili Stew"

Serves: 6 to 8

5 to 6 lb. Pork Butt Roast
2 large green bell peppers, sliced lengthwise in thick strips
2 large red bell peppers, sliced lengthwise in thick strips
2 large yellow onions, large chopped
4 stalks of celery, large chopped
1/2 cup Cilantro, finely chopped
4 cloves of garlic, minced
3 green serrano chilie peppers, small dice chopped (Add your favorite type of green chilies)
4 lbs. red potatos, peeled, cut into large cubes
2 cups fresh corn
2 bay leaves
1/2 to 1 teaspoon ground Cumin
1/2 teaspoon dried Sweet Basil
2 cans of Rotele's Diced Green Chilies and Tomatoes w/juice
1 large can tomato puree
1/4 cup of fresh lime juice
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup cooking oil
2 packs of roux or gravy mix, or make a homemade roux with the roast drippings
2 gals. of water
2 cups long grain rice
1 cup white wine to deglaze pot
3 tablespoons flour *for homemade roux


Sear the pork roast butt in a 10 quart (Gumbo) pot in oil. To sear your pork roast, first put the fire on high and heat the pot just before the oil starts to smoke. Brown the roast quickly on all sides, but don't over cook it. A nice golden brown will suffice. Let your roast rest on a plate and turn down the flame to med heat and add in the wine to deglaze the bottom of the pot while scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon. At this stage you can either use the gravey paks or roux mix or you can make your roux from scratch.

After the roux is a dark golden brown or your roux mix is ready add in the water and the roast. Next add the cumin powder, bay leaves, sweet basil, salt and pepper. Cover and let the roast boil for 1 hour on High heat. Next add in chopped onions, red and green bell peppers, diced green chilies (you can add in the seeds if you want to take the stew up a few more notches on the fire-scale), chopped celery, tomato puree, Rotele diced green chilies and tomatoes, olive oil, and minced garlic. Bring to a roaring boil and cover, reduce to Med-high heat and cook for 45 more minutes. Stir occasionally. Now add in the cubed potatos, fresh corn, cilantro and lime juice, and cook for 40 to 50 minutes or until the potatos are tender. Because potatos absorb most of all the salt when boiled, when the stew is done you need to taste to see if the broth needs more salt. Serve in large bowls over cooked/steamed rice, along with some homemade cornbread on the side. Enjoy!!! (My oldest loves this stew and so do I.)

Happy Cooking,
Roisin
angel_not.gif


--------------------
Roisin-Teagan

"There, in that hand, on that shoulder under that chin---all of its lightness delicately balanced and its strings skillfully bowed---it becomes a voice."---Rich Mullins

"At 18, if you have oversized aspirations, the whole world sees you as a dreamer. At 40, you get the reputation for being a visionary." ---Rich Mullins

"God gives the gifts where He finds the vessel empty enough to receive them."---C.S. Lewis

Éire go Brách!
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Shadows 
Posted: 10-May-2004, 01:16 PM
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ZodiacHolly

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Recipe Name: SHRIMP AND MUENSTER QUESADILLA
Category: MEXICAN
Serves: 2

4 Each Tortillas ,flour
1/2 pound Muenster cheese grated
4 ounces Cooked salad shrimp defrosted
Spray oil
Salsa
Sour cream

This appetizer makes a great cocktail hors d'oeuvre.


Pre-heat a heavy skillet over medium heat. Spray with the oil. Add 1 tortilla. Top with 1/2 the cheese and 1/2 the shrimp. Top with 1 tortilla. Lightly brown on both sides. Cut into eight pie-like wedges. Repeat. Serve warm with sides of salsa and sour cream.
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