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Squire Posted on: 31-Oct-2019, 10:35 AM

Replies: 4
Views: 489
Congratulations I know it will be a good read. Happy Halloween and let the ghosts out! ghost.gif
  Forum: What's New!  ·  Post Preview: #317412

Poll Poll: Game Reset
Squire Posted on: 30-Oct-2019, 11:59 AM

Replies: 2
Views: 689
I know there are very few people playing and i'm not sure what would be an incentive to get more people to play more. I enjoy the game and have fun playing. Perhaps a reset at the end of the year would be a good idea giving people a chance to play around before the reset. I am fine with whenever you want to do it, at this point with my resources I am pretty much untouchable.

Thanks for all you do with the game and CR.
  Forum: Medieval Kingdom  ·  Post Preview: #317411

Squire Posted on: 10-Oct-2019, 09:20 AM

Replies: 4
Views: 854
QUOTE (ryansgirl @ 23-Mar-2019, 02:32 PM)
I'm also having trouble recruiting workers. I am in the 5th spot and everytime I try to recruit workers nothing happens and I have more than enough gold. So I know that's not the problem.

If gold isn't an issue just use the maximum with 9's and you will eventually recruit a lot of workers. If you need more resources just ask I have plenty to spare.
  Forum: Bug Reports  ·  Post Preview: #317391

Poll Poll: Game Reset
Squire Posted on: 10-Oct-2019, 07:41 AM

Replies: 2
Views: 689
Please vote in the latest poll for a game reset.

Thank you
Squire
  Forum: Medieval Kingdom  ·  Post Preview: #317390

Squire Posted on: 06-Oct-2019, 01:42 PM

Replies: 5
Views: 2,663
Welcome to the forum and glad you posted a brief introduction, it's a good way to get to know fellow listeners and learn more about Celtic pasts. Hopefully the sadness of the past is now gladness for the future! smile.gif
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #317381

Squire Posted on: 21-Feb-2019, 09:28 AM

Replies: 5
Views: 1,294
The drive is now alive so go click on the thermometer and get some great stuff. I just bought some beer gear and a tales book. Help support the efforts of our favorite Celtic Radio site and keep the music flowing!

http://www.celticradio.net/php/donations/f...und_raising.php


Cheers beer_mug.gif
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #317173

Squire Posted on: 06-Feb-2019, 03:06 PM

Replies: 0
Views: 3,491
The Hell Fire Club: Debauchery, Sacrifice & Hauntings
Are you brave enough to visit the infamous Hell Fire Club one of Ireland’s most haunted sites?

Striking fear into the hearts of all those who know the legends and myths surrounding this isolated and desolate building high in the Dublin mountains.

Its scorched appearance adding drama to its historic association with rituals, black magic and the Devil.

What is the Hell Fire Club?

The Hell Fire Club is the name local people give to the isolated ruined, creepy, lonely hunting lodge. It is located in the desolate isolation of the Dublin Mountains on Montpelier Hill surrounded by deep forestry known as Hell Fire Hill Wood.

With views looking out over Dublin City this eerie place has a vicious reputation and could almost be considered peaceful in its silent isolation.

This former luxurious hunting lodge was constructed by William Connolly in 1725 and was named Mount Peilleir from then on the Hill where it resides also takes the same name.

There is no record of the original Irish name that this hill would have been called, but one thing is certain it has deep rooted associations with the burials of the ancient Irish.

The Hell Fire Club disturbed the spirits of the Ancient Ancestral Dead.

The building was doomed from the moment of its construction as it is built on the sacred land of the Irish.

This was the site of an ancient Irish passage grave, a tomb also known as a Cairn. To build his new hunting lodge of excess William Connolly destroyed an ancient sacred site.

As we all know the sites of our ancients should never be disturbed. They are sites of our ancestors and are revered.

Connolly ripped the sacred site apart using the sacred stones to build his house of debauchery. Even uprooting an ancient standing stone to use as the lintel above the fireplace.

Shortly after construction the roof was blown off the lodge during a violent storm. Perhaps a violent response from the ancestors for disturbing the resting place of the ancient spirits.

Connolly replaced the roof with a barreled vaulted ceiling.

The lodge was extensive with comfortable reception rooms and bedrooms. There were servant’s quarters and stables for horses.

The Irish Chapter of The Hell Fire Club.

The Irish Chapter of The Hell Fire Club was founded by James Worsdale and Richard Parsons 1st Earl of Rosse in 1737. Members of The Hell Fire Club were all from wealthy aerostatic backgrounds.

The Connolly Hunting Lodge was leased to the Irish Hell Fire Club and that was when its already haunted reputation took a turn into the horrific blackness of the occult.

Maybe a coincidence but William Connolly originally purchased this land from the Duke of Wharton the first founder of the first Hell fire Club in 1719.

What was The Hell Fire Club?

The Irish Chapter of The Hell Fire Club was first founded by Richard Parsons in 1735. Richard Parsons had an infamous reputation as a man who deeply dabbled in the art of black magic and occultist practices.

The Hell Fire Club draws its name from the man who choose to use this isolated location for its dark rituals all drawing from the darkest realms of occult. The Hell Fire Club was associated with amoral behavior.

Their rituals involved alcohol and sexual rituals and debauched behaviors. The secrecy held by its members led to local rumors of satanic rituals and devil worship. It is said that the head of The Hell Fire Club was referred to as the King of Hell even dressing like the winged horned Devil.

Members even left an empty place at the table for the Devil to attend.

Members were said to sacrifice blacks cats and even humans as part of their satanic demonic rituals. Those rituals were said to have taken place on a regular basis leaving a vicious presence in this ruined building.

The Tales of The Hell Fire Club.

One tale tells that a stranger joined the members at a card game one stormy evening after seeking shelter from a vicious storm that swept across the mountains.

A member dropped his cards and as he bent down to pick it up he saw that the stranger had a cloven hooves instead of feet.

The stranger disappeared into a ball of fire and was never seen again. This story might sound familiar to some as it bears some striking similarities to the legend of Loftus Hall, Irelands most haunted house.

Maybe this is a coincidence but The Loftus Family also owned a hunting lodge close by on the Hill, did the devil visit them twice. It is said that a young local boy once visited the Hell Fire Club and bore witness to the rituals and never again spoke.

The terrifying practices terrified him so much he never spoke a word for the rest of his life.

Possibly the most famous tale of Dublin’s Hell Fire Club is the haunting of a massive black cat.

The legend says that a visitor to the area went to view the infamous club and was found dead the following morning. The local farmer whom he had been staying with discovered his remains with the local priest.

Upon entering the Club they discovered the hall with the table set with a wonderful banquette and a massive black cat was prowling through the building.

The priest performed an exorcism which ripped the cat apart forcing the demon possessing the creature to break free from the cat into its natural violent form ridding the Hell Fire Club of its presence.

Upon leaving the lodge the priest discovered the farmer who was with him was lying on the ground with his face ripped apart with deep claw marks.

The Modern State of The Hell Fire Club

The Hell Fire Club is now a burned abandoned ruin. However it is still the site of strange occurrences. At night strange noises and smells come from this isolated area.

Evidence of black magic rituals is still evident today guarded by the large black cat. The rituals and sacrifices that were preformed here still linger in the air.

The spirits of human and animal sacrifices still present. Reminding us of the violent and dark happenings that once took place in this isolated and lonely hunting lodge that now surveys the lights of Dublin City.


Sinead Murphy

Sinead is the head of our Historical and Cultural research team. Sinead studied Archaeology with modular Anthropology, and has Post Graduate qualifications in Heritage Management, including History, Museum Management and Religious Studies.


https://myrealireland.com/irish-knowledge/t...hell-fire-club/

  Forum: The Celts  ·  Post Preview: #317155

Squire Posted on: 05-Feb-2019, 04:18 PM

Replies: 5
Views: 3,149
I received my two shirts I ordered and they are good quality and the right fit. Keep up the great work and be sure to actively promote the fundraising drive!

Cheers beer_mug.gif
  Forum: What's New!  ·  Post Preview: #317154

Squire Posted on: 05-Feb-2019, 04:12 PM

Replies: 5
Views: 1,294
I don't think they have done the fundraising drive yet. My founders subscription just auto renewed but I believe the drive is coming very soon, there was a post about it a few weeks ago.
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #317153

Squire Posted on: 07-Jan-2019, 08:22 AM

Replies: 5
Views: 3,149
Celtic Radio,

What a fantastic way to start off the new year! I appreciate all you do keeping this wonderful site going showcasing great Celtic music also the forums and game. To show my appreciation I will visit the gift shop this week and purchase a few items.

Thank you for all you do and happy 2019!

Cheers,
Ian-(Squire)

  Forum: What's New!  ·  Post Preview: #317104

Squire Posted on: 15-Nov-2018, 09:35 AM

Replies: 1
Views: 1,232
(I came across this story and found it interesting and thought I would share. Enjoy)

Boudicca – Warrior Queen of the Iceni

Boudicca (spelled in a variety of ways) was the legendary queen of the Iceni, a Celtic tribe that resided in Britain. Her reign corresponded with the Roman occupation of Britain and while her leadership was brief, it was so memorable that historians still speak about it 2,000 years later.

Boudicca has been described as the ‘first British heroine’ and is an early example of Girl Power in action!

Early Life

Not a great deal is known about Boudicca’s early years which is hardly a surprise since we are relying on the writings of two Roman scribes; Tacitus and Cassius Dio, and Boudicca’s reign occurred when the former writer was a baby and around 100 years before the birth of the latter! However, both men agree that she was of Royal descent and was known for being extremely intelligent. It is said that she struck quite a figure as she was tall, powerfully built with long red hair, a piercing stare and harsh voice.

She got married to Prasutagus, king of the Iceni tribe who lived in Norfolk. The Iceni initially managed to retain independence when Claudius conquered Britain in AD 43 and threatened a revolt four years later when a Roman governor made plans to disarm the tribe. Prasutagus wanted to preserve the peace so before he died, he made the Roman emperor co-heir to his kingdom along with his Boudicca and her two daughters.

Boudicca with Spear

It is said that she struck quite a figure as she was tall, powerfully built with long red hair, a piercing stare and harsh voice.

Unfortunately, the king made a grievous error since under Roman law, inheritance was only allowed through the male line so when Prasutagus died with no male heir, the Romans annexed the Iceni kingdom. It was as if the tribe had been conquered even though they had not been defeated on the battlefield.


Revolt

The leading tribesmen of the Iceni had their land taken away and Boudicca claimed that she was raped and flogged along with her two daughters. This is where the legend of Boudicca really begins as in AD 60, she raised an army and joined forces with the Trinovantes, another disaffected tribe. It says much for Boudicca’s character that she was chosen to be the leader of the combined forces. Sources suggest that the tribes took inspiration from their ancestors who drove the Romans from Britain 100 years before and the prince of the Cherusci, Arminius, who defeated the Romans in Germany half a century previously.


Victory

Boudicca wasted no time and her forces destroyed Camulodunum (modern day Colchester) which was the previous Trinovantian capital before it was taken by the Romans. When the Romans inside the city appealed for help, only 200 soldiers were sent and Boudicca’s forces showed no mercy and wiped out the inhabitants. Modern historians stated that the fury of this attack was akin to a mini Pompeii or Herculaneum, cities that had been destroyed by volcanic eruptions! A Roman governor tried to assist the city but his forces were also annihilated. Archaeologists claim that the city was methodically destroyed by the rebels.

The timing of the revolt was impeccable because the governor, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, had his hands full on the Isle of Anglesey where his army was busily destroying a Druid settlement at Mona. As a result, initial battles were one-sided as Boudicca’s army greatly outnumbered the Roman enemy. While Cassius Dio estimated her army to have 230,000 soldiers, this is almost certainly an exaggeration.

Boudicca Statue


When Boudicca’s army arrived, a massacre took place and all those within London city died.

The next target was Londinium (London) and while Suetonius had returned with a small garrison, he decided not to defend the city and abandoned it to its fate. When Boudicca’s army arrived, a massacre took place and all those within the city died. While the Roman sources claim that 70,000 people died in the rampage, again, it is probable that this number was exaggerated to dehumanise the Celtic forces.

Defeat

Boudicca’s revolt was not to last much longer however as Suetonius gathered an army of 10,000+ trained soldiers and prepared for battle at Watling Street, an ancient trackway that linked Canterbury and St Albans. It was AD 61 and Boudicca’s army came from St Albans to meet the Roman governor. This was to be a grave mistake as it gave the Romans a massive advantage; while they were heavily outnumbered, the Romans had excellent equipment and experience in battle. In contrast, few of Boudicca’s army had armour and most were armed with agricultural tools.

It is said that Boudicca sat on a chariot and gave a rousing speech before the battle. Tacitus wrote that the Queen of the Iceni told the Romans that she was avenging lost freedom and the abuse of her, her daughters and her kingdom. She concluded by saying her cause was just and that she would rather die than live as a slave.

Boudicca Defeat

The fleeing rebels were blocked by their own wagons and slaughtered by the merciless Romans.

While this surely roused her army, she did not have the tactical knowledge to get the best out of her advantage in numbers in an open field and the Romans began with a salvo of javelins which killed thousands of the rebels. The Romans then attacked in a wedge formation and the fleeing rebels were blocked by their own wagons and slaughtered by the merciless Romans. Given the numbers of the field, it was a surprisingly quick battle though Tacitus was probably exaggerating again when he said 80,000 rebels died while only 4,000 Romans perished.


Death & Legacy

The Roman sources disagree on what happened to Boudicca after the battle. While Dio claims she died of an illness, Tacitus’ account of how she committed suicide by drinking poison to avoid capture seems more likely.

Boudicca’s rebellion may have ultimately failed but she is now seen as a modern day heroine. Historians have remarked on how the Iceni queen is an icon of British history while being a symbol both of British freedom and also of female power. The enduring nature of her legend can be seen through the various movies retelling the story and in 1902, a statue of Boudicca was unveiled near Westminster Bridge in London. It is an amazing image of a proud female warrior standing in a war chariot, holding a spear; it is a figure of fearlessness, hope and freedom and aptly sums up a remarkable woman who was prepared to stand up to the might of Rome and die for a cause she believed was just.

  Forum: The Celts  ·  Post Preview: #317021

Squire Posted on: 07-Nov-2018, 09:45 AM

Replies: 6
Views: 1,151
Welcome to Celtic Radio Garen hope you enjoy the music and fellowship. Be sure to check out all the different channels as there is a wide variety of music to listen to and enjoy.

Cheers,

Squire
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #316998

Squire Posted on: 07-Nov-2018, 09:35 AM

Replies: 5
Views: 1,099
Welcome back, I haven't been around that long but have been here a while now and am also a Floridian but a few hours south. Hopefully you can reconnect and make some new acquaintances.

Cheers,

Squire
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #316997

Squire Posted on: 02-Sep-2018, 11:07 AM

Replies: 6
Views: 3,174
This looks very good and I agree it would be great to see on the big screen. Historical accuracy is always a problem when it comes to movies so hopefully this won't disappoint but as prior comments indicate that in the short preview it seems to be on the right track.

Hopefully it will be a trilogy so there is more to look forward too. Hurry up November I am already excited!!!

Cheers beer_mug.gif
  Forum: What's New!  ·  Post Preview: #316916

Squire Posted on: 28-Aug-2018, 01:26 PM

Replies: 0
Views: 1,111
Here is a good resource for all medieval weapons used for battle in case you are interested:

http://www.medievalwarfare.info/weapons.htm


Pikes


A pike is a pole weapon, a very long thrusting weapon used extensively by infantry both for attacks on enemy foot soldiers and as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. Unlike many similar weapons, the pike is not intended to be thrown. Pikes were used by European troops from the early Middle Ages until around 1700, and wielded by foot soldiers deployed in close order. While the soldiers using such spears may not have called them "pikes", their tactical employment of these weapons ran along broadly similar lines.

The pike was an extremely long weapon, varying considerably in size, from 3 to 6 metres (10 to over 20 feet) long. It had a wooden shaft with an iron or steel spearhead affixed. The shaft near the head was often reinforced with metal strips called "cheeks" or langets. When the troops of opposing armies both carried the pike, it often grew in a sort of arms race, getting longer in both shaft and head length to give one side's pikemen an edge in the combat; the longest pikes could exceed 6 m (22 feet) in length. The extreme length of such weapons required a strong wood such as well-seasoned ash for the pole, which was tapered towards the point to prevent the pike sagging on the ends, although this was always a problem in pike handling.
Pikes

A pike is a pole weapon, a very long thrusting weapon used extensively by infantry both for attacks on enemy foot soldiers and as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. Unlike many similar weapons, the pike is not intended to be thrown. Pikes were used by European troops from the early Middle Ages until around 1700, and wielded by foot soldiers deployed in close order. While the soldiers using such spears may not have called them "pikes", their tactical employment of these weapons ran along broadly similar lines.

The pike was an extremely long weapon, varying considerably in size, from 3 to 6 metres (10 to over 20 feet) long. It had a wooden shaft with an iron or steel spearhead affixed. The shaft near the head was often reinforced with metal strips called "cheeks" or langets. When the troops of opposing armies both carried the pike, it often grew in a sort of arms race, getting longer in both shaft and head length to give one side's pikemen an edge in the combat; the longest pikes could exceed 6 m (22 feet) in length. The extreme length of such weapons required a strong wood such as well-seasoned ash for the pole, which was tapered towards the point to prevent the pike sagging on the ends, although this was always a problem in pike handling.
Pikes

A pike is a pole weapon, a very long thrusting weapon used extensively by infantry both for attacks on enemy foot soldiers and as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. Unlike many similar weapons, the pike is not intended to be thrown. Pikes were used by European troops from the early Middle Ages until around 1700, and wielded by foot soldiers deployed in close order. While the soldiers using such spears may not have called them "pikes", their tactical employment of these weapons ran along broadly similar lines.

The pike was an extremely long weapon, varying considerably in size, from 3 to 6 metres (10 to over 20 feet) long. It had a wooden shaft with an iron or steel spearhead affixed. The shaft near the head was often reinforced with metal strips called "cheeks" or langets. When the troops of opposing armies both carried the pike, it often grew in a sort of arms race, getting longer in both shaft and head length to give one side's pikemen an edge in the combat; the longest pikes could exceed 6 m (22 feet) in length. The extreme length of such weapons required a strong wood such as well-seasoned ash for the pole, which was tapered towards the point to prevent the pike sagging on the ends, although this was always a problem in pike handling.

Traction Trebuchets


The trebuchet derives from the ancient sling. A variation of the sling contained a short piece of wood to extend the arm and provide greater leverage. This was evolved into the traction trebuchet by the Chinese, in which a number of people pull on ropes attached to the short arm of a lever that has a sling on the long arm. This type of trebuchet is smaller and has a shorter range but is a more portable machine and has a faster rate of fire than a larger counterweight powered one. The smallest traction trebuchets could be powered by the weight and pulling strength of one person using a single rope; but most were designed and sized to need from 15 to 45 men, generally two per rope. These teams would sometimes be local citizens assisting in the siege or in the defence of their town. Traction trebuchets had a range of from 2000 to well over 3000 feet when casting weights up to 750 pounds (60 kg). A traction trebuchet functions in the same way as a counterweight trebuchet, except that instead of a hoisted weight, the hurling arm is powered by a crew of men, pulling on ropes attached to the short lever arm. A counterweight trebuchet is powered by a very heavy counterweight, acting on a lever arm. The fulcrum of the lever (usually an axle) is supported by a high frame, and the counterweight is suspended from the short arm of the lever. The sling is attached to the end of the long arm of the lever.

One end of the sling is captive, while the other end is hooked to the long arm in such a way as to release when the arm and sling reach the optimal hurling angles. The trebuchet is energized by lowering the long arm and raising the weighted short arm, usually with a winch, and is locked into the charged state by a trigger mechanism (cocked). With the long arm lowered near ground level, the sling is loaded with the projectile, and laid out on the ground, with the captive and hooked ends away from the target, and the load and pouch laid on the ground toward the target, under the trebuchet. When the trigger is released, the weighted short arm is driven by gravity into an accelerating pendulum motion, causing the lighter, long arm of the lever to revolve around the fulcrum at the opposite arc, which in turn, pulls the sling and its contents into a whipping motion at the end of the long arm. As the arm continues to swing past the vertical position, the counterweight rises, causing the lever motion to begin to slow down, while the sling continues to whip forward around the end of the long arm. When the sling reaches its launch angle, one end slips from its hook, releasing the projectile toward the target.

Battering Rams

A battering ram is a siege engine originating in ancient times to breach fortification walls or doors. In its simplest form, a battering ram is just a large, heavy log carried by several people and propelled with force against the target, the momentum of the ram damaging the target.

Some battering rams were supported by rollers. This gave the ram much greater travel so that it could achieve a greater speed before striking its target and was therefore more destructive.

In a more sophisticated design, the ram was slung from a wheeled support frame so that it could be much more massive and also more easily swung against its target. Sometimes the ram's attacking point would be reinforced with a metal head. A capped ram is a battering ram that has an accessory at the head (usually made of iron or steel, traditionally shaped into the head and horns of a ram to do more damage to a building.


Let the battle begin!
  Forum: Medieval Kingdom  ·  Post Preview: #316889

Squire Posted on: 27-Aug-2018, 12:28 PM

Replies: 1
Views: 986
Well whoever is doing it is really rich...Tax collector was taking Billions from me every time they stopped by my castle. king.gif It's funny going from 65 Trillion in gold to a couple thousand. censored.gif Royal08.gif
  Forum: Medieval Kingdom  ·  Post Preview: #316888

Squire Posted on: 14-Aug-2018, 02:49 PM

Replies: 2
Views: 2,092
Continuing the hurling story with a little history for those who are interested:


https://www.irishcentral.com/opinion/others...ireland-hurling
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #316875

Squire Posted on: 16-Jul-2018, 02:08 PM

Replies: 1
Views: 1,049

https://jimmygeorge.bandcamp.com/track/toke...c-drinking-song

is this the song you were looking for?
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #316840

Squire Posted on: 16-Jul-2018, 11:00 AM

Replies: 3
Views: 1,745


Dowth is possibly the oldest of the three great mounds of the Brú na Bóinne complex, and is the least explored in terms of modern archaeology. It has two known passages, on its southwestern side, one of which has an alignment towards setting sun on the winter solstice. The mound was partly excavated in the 1840s, a disastrous archaeological expedition which wrought serious damage to the mound. It is thought the great cairn has a total of 115 kerb stones, although many of them remain buried. Its most famous kerb, known as the Stone of the Seven Suns, is one of a handful that are exposed.

https://mythicalireland.com/ancient-sites/dowth-dubad/



<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/72097181" width="640" height="384" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #316839

Squire Posted on: 12-Jul-2018, 08:00 AM

Replies: 7
Views: 3,612
Thanks for the links these are great more festivals than I thought.
  Forum: General Discussion  ·  Post Preview: #316838

Squire Posted on: 12-Jul-2018, 07:18 AM

Replies: 1
Views: 1,225
Thank you for sharing that was a very interesting article, I had not seen those stones before and some of the detail is incredible for the time. Cheers.
  Forum: What's New!  ·  Post Preview: #316837

Squire Posted on: 10-Jul-2018, 08:52 AM

Replies: 0
Views: 557
Gold 26,047,281,980,468
Food 2,714,455,042,169
Wood 25,618,980,368,071

Last night I had 25 Trillion in food and today there is only 2, how does 23 Trillion just disappear?

Thanks,
Squire
  Forum: Bug Reports  ·  Post Preview: #316834

Squire Posted on: 26-Jun-2018, 02:09 PM

Replies: 2
Views: 760
Hello and welcome to Celtic radio there is plenty of great music and channels to discover and enjoy! Cheers
  Forum: Introductions  ·  Post Preview: #316786

Squire Posted on: 06-Jun-2018, 08:40 AM

Replies: 1
Views: 848
Perhaps it is busy jumping over the moon.gif or maybe just went out for some milk. Cows are funny like that so I just stick to dragons velho.gif

Cheers beer_mug.gif
  Forum: Medieval Kingdom  ·  Post Preview: #316755

Squire Posted on: 17-May-2018, 12:41 PM

Replies: 2,251
Views: 43,706
I- IRONCLAD (2011)

Set in a time of bitter civil war, based on the true story of the great siege of Rochester castle

king.gif beer_mug.gif
  Forum: Fun N Games  ·  Post Preview: #316708

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