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Celtic Radio Community > Genealogy & Family History > Using Dna Testing In Genealogy


Posted by: MacEoghainn 05-Feb-2006, 12:34 PM
I posted this over in Arms and Badges under the Ewing Family name http://heraldry.celticradio.net//shop/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=8. Thought I'd post it here also.

QUOTE
There is major disagreement between various genealogists as to the origination of the Stirling/Dunbartonshire Ewings. Clan MacEwen, which is/was a Highland Gaelic Clan in Argylshire (and also Clan MacLachlan) claim the Stirling/Dunbartonshire Ewings to be part of the original MacEwen Clan that was dispursed after the Clan was broken in the 1400s (see the http://www.maclachlans.org/ website  for more info, also see the http://www.clanewing.org/ website for evidence of the Cymric posistion {Celtic Breton}). Current DNA testing seems to indicate that the Ewings are from Gaelic Highland stock: From http://www.familytreedna.com/(rfydee55y1c5dbawi0xg5fua)/public/ewing/index.aspx: "One very interesting result is that the modal haplotype for the related Ewing men appears to be an unusual variant of a Gaelic subtype. Many of us had thought that Ewing originated in Celtic Breton tribes in the Scottish lowlands, but this result suggests that they may have been among the Gaelic Scotti, sometimes also called the Dal Riada Celts. "

It is said that people bearing the name Young who claim Scottish ancestry are also part of the larger Ewing family.

Steve Ewing


Is anyone else involved in Dna testing for genealogical purposes? It appears in my families case some of the information passed down was in error, I suspect for political reasons or to fit better in the community my ancestors found themselves living in.

Posted by: Dogshirt 05-Feb-2006, 01:40 PM
Not involved but I find it interesting. But with a name like Taasevigen (and a few variants; Tossvikon etc) you is kin or you ain't! When we get back to the Ellingsons THEN it gets much trickier! Damn Scandinavian surnames anyway! wacko.gif

beer_mug.gif

Posted by: Sekhmet 06-Feb-2006, 09:03 PM
Right now the Todd family (of the Gordon ilk) are in the process of testing out their lines to see how many branches are in the US, when they came over, and where they mainly settled. The next step will be to make the connection back in the old country.

Posted by: Opa B 10-Sep-2007, 10:52 AM
QUOTE (MacEoghainn @ 05-Feb-2006, 01:34 PM)
I posted this over in Arms and Badges under the Ewing Family name http://heraldry.celticradio.net//shop/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=8. Thought I'd post it here also.

QUOTE
There is major disagreement between various genealogists as to the origination of the Stirling/Dunbartonshire Ewings. Clan MacEwen, which is/was a Highland Gaelic Clan in Argylshire (and also Clan MacLachlan) claim the Stirling/Dunbartonshire Ewings to be part of the original MacEwen Clan that was dispursed after the Clan was broken in the 1400s (see the http://www.maclachlans.org/ website  for more info, also see the http://www.clanewing.org/ website for evidence of the Cymric posistion {Celtic Breton}). Current DNA testing seems to indicate that the Ewings are from Gaelic Highland stock: From http://www.familytreedna.com/(rfydee55y1c5dbawi0xg5fua)/public/ewing/index.aspx: "One very interesting result is that the modal haplotype for the related Ewing men appears to be an unusual variant of a Gaelic subtype. Many of us had thought that Ewing originated in Celtic Breton tribes in the Scottish lowlands, but this result suggests that they may have been among the Gaelic Scotti, sometimes also called the Dal Riada Celts. "

It is said that people bearing the name Young who claim Scottish ancestry are also part of the larger Ewing family.

Steve Ewing


Is anyone else involved in Dna testing for genealogical purposes? It appears in my families case some of the information passed down was in error, I suspect for political reasons or to fit better in the community my ancestors found themselves living in.

beer_mug.gif thumbs_up.gif: Opa B, I have been able to completely bypass the Kelts of England and go straight to Southern Europe, because of a DNA test,

Posted by: Opa B 10-Sep-2007, 10:57 AM
QUOTE (MacEoghainn @ 05-Feb-2006, 01:34 PM)
I posted this over in Arms and Badges under the Ewing Family name http://heraldry.celticradio.net//shop/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=8. Thought I'd post it here also.

QUOTE
There is major disagreement between various genealogists as to the origination of the Stirling/Dunbartonshire Ewings. Clan MacEwen, which is/was a Highland Gaelic Clan in Argylshire (and also Clan MacLachlan) claim the Stirling/Dunbartonshire Ewings to be part of the original MacEwen Clan that was dispursed after the Clan was broken in the 1400s (see the http://www.maclachlans.org/ website  for more info, also see the http://www.clanewing.org/ website for evidence of the Cymric posistion {Celtic Breton}). Current DNA testing seems to indicate that the Ewings are from Gaelic Highland stock: From http://www.familytreedna.com/(rfydee55y1c5dbawi0xg5fua)/public/ewing/index.aspx: "One very interesting result is that the modal haplotype for the related Ewing men appears to be an unusual variant of a Gaelic subtype. Many of us had thought that Ewing originated in Celtic Breton tribes in the Scottish lowlands, but this result suggests that they may have been among the Gaelic Scotti, sometimes also called the Dal Riada Celts. "

It is said that people bearing the name Young who claim Scottish ancestry are also part of the larger Ewing family.

Steve Ewing


Is anyone else involved in Dna testing for genealogical purposes? It appears in my families case some of the information passed down was in error, I suspect for political reasons or to fit better in the community my ancestors found themselves living in.

beer_mug.gif smile.gif : the Kelts especially the Irish, originated in Scythia, now southern Russia, then the Bulgeria area, then the south Central Europe or northern part of Italy, and ended up in northwestern Spain before the Ireland,

Posted by: Opa B 10-Sep-2007, 11:17 AM
QUOTE (Sekhmet @ 06-Feb-2006, 10:03 PM)
Right now the Todd family (of the Gordon ilk) are in the process of testing out their lines to see how many branches are in the US, when they came over, and where they mainly settled. The next step will be to make the connection back in the old country.

beer_mug.gif smile.gif : Opa B: be prepared for some surprises, Family Tree DNA is probaly the best for getting a DNA done, I had 13 matches and only 4 are Bricker, the Data Bank in Berlin Germany doesn't give last names, but will tell you how many matches and what country they are in, and there is a report called Celts, you might find interesting, and The Cimbri Nation, I like this one because it explains my DNA S28 on marker 259, S28 is Keltic, and the 3rd one you all need to check is called: Population data for Y-chromosome STR Haplotypes from Piedmont Italy, there are still many of the original Keltics scattared in that Alpine area,

My DNA says I'm Keltic, my ancestors say I'm Deutsch by association and marriage, I was born a Germerican in Germerica,
My last name went from Brügger-Brücker-Bricker,

my wife is a Viken-Viking from Scandinavia, a Norman invader in Normandy France (Normanville France), a conquerer of England and settled in Scotland,
Her last name went from Normanville-Norville-Norton ,

Posted by: Mailagnas maqqas Dunaidonas 11-Sep-2007, 05:38 AM
Clan Donald has been doing DNA studies for several years. Overall results are generally consistent with oral tradition. My own results place me in the group of men of Irish descent who may be direct descendants of Niall of the Nine Hostages, which is consistent with my direct paternal immigrant ancester moving from Nortern Ireland to the US in the early 1800's.




Posted by: UlsterScotNutt 09-Jun-2008, 02:18 PM
I'm scraping my cheek with one hand and typing with the other!!! Doing a marker 37 y-DNA test for McNutt . Ok , just finished the last of 3 cheek scrapings and packing it off to FamilyDNA.
We are positive back to 1690, but have some discrepencies within the oral and written history of the last born Nutt in Ireland. Some history says 3 brothers , 2 of whom we lost touch with, another says 4 brothers of which 3 are lost track of. One says the last Nutt born in Ireland may actually have been born in Scotland then moved to Ireland. Then another says he was born in Ireland and his parents had just prior to 1690, 10 to 20 years before, moved from Scotland to Ireland and another has the Nutts being of ScotsIrish Ulster Plantation again but very early on in the 1600s.
The Nutts are very well documented in the States with just abit of confusion as to a couple of family potential ties. DNA testing would be a great way to determine if 2 possibly 3 distinct Nutt families of the early 1700 were indeed brothers or not. This could account for the lost brothers.

Posted by: UlsterScotNutt 10-Jul-2008, 11:39 AM
I just got back my marker 12 results!!!! TOO COOL!!!!!!!!
I already received a email from a direct match in Canada and am overwhelmed with information.
I am not sure what it all means yet, but it is pretty cool.
All kinds of names and locations, so far everything pans out to the family history of Scots moved to the north of Ireland and with the haplogroup* descended from Niall ancestry, not sure what that all means. Even has map locations with push pins of those with exact matches, over 100 and then another 600 with 1 and 2 marker differences.
We actually drove right past 4 cousins with 12 marker matches on our trip to Ireland.
One of the direct matches is located right in the ancestral homelands in Scotland near Inverrary for clan MacNaughten. and a bunch more all around there.
One of the direct matches shows up in the middle of China!! I do know there was a Dr. Liu who was the 9th generation from the 9th child of the first Nutt in the States. Not sure when the family made it over to China.
Wonder if I can get Olympic tickets!!

*R1b1b2e Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. Its branch R1b1b2e is primarily found in Northern Ireland, and contains the Niall Modal Haplotype.

Can't wait for the 25 and 37 markers!!!!!!
As you can tell I am very excited with this new info and the possibility of breaking new grounds on the familys' genealogy.

USN

Posted by: UlsterScotNutt 10-Jul-2008, 11:46 AM
I was just reading up on Niall of the Nine Hostages and thought this sentence was great, and explained alot too.

*In January 2006, scientists suggested that Niall may have been the most fecund male in Irish history, and second only to Genghis Khan worldwide. In northwest Ireland as many as one-fifth of men have a common Y chromosome haplotype that lies within the haplogroup R1b**

* from wikipedia

** and I'm one of them

Posted by: Sekhmet 10-Jul-2008, 03:03 PM
Very cool! I have to dig ours back out, my mother did the National Geographic DNA testing as well, and for the life of me I don't know what I did with the results. They're around somewhere...

Our Todd DNA managed to settle a lot of questions we had regarding which branch belongs to which. The line I'm descended from seems to have landed in Pennsylvania, where they settled and the branches split from there. There's another branch that is in North Carolina that we still don't know much about, they're totally unrelated as near as we can find so far.


Posted by: UlsterScotNutt 14-Jul-2008, 02:23 PM
QUOTE (Sekhmet @ 10-Jul-2008, 04:03 PM)
Very cool! I have to dig ours back out, my mother did the National Geographic DNA testing as well, and for the life of me I don't know what I did with the results. They're around somewhere...

Our Todd DNA managed to settle a lot of questions we had regarding which branch belongs to which. The line I'm descended from seems to have landed in Pennsylvania, where they settled and the branches split from there. There's another branch that is in North Carolina that we still don't know much about, they're totally unrelated as near as we can find so far.

Sekhmet, With my having done this DNA test we may have broken thru a new level in connecting past lineage. Oral history and post dated written history has the story of my gggggggggrandfather being one of either 3 or 4 brothers with the 2 or 3 other brothers losing touch with him. Some say one may have remained in Ireland. Some say an Alexander and a John may be his brothers but there is no documented proof, just anectdotal evidence in geographic proximities that they settled in the colonies and in the names of their corresponding children, all sharing names.
Now with DNA testing I have been matched with a descendent of one of the other McNutts and this may very well attach some credence to the stories. I'm just not sure yet as I have not seen the documentation for the other family member.

USN

Posted by: MacEoghainn 14-Jul-2008, 06:01 PM
I have attached a report (I hope) that will give everyone an idea of how complex this stuff can get, and yet how much progress can be made through DNA testing.

This report is by Dr. David N. Ewing, MD, who is the gentleman in charge of the Clan Ewing DNA study mentioned in my original post. David and I are also seventh cousins once removed according to our conventional paper Genealogies (We are listed as SR and DN in the report).

The DYF399X testing we did was an attempt to differentiate closely related groups of Ewing men. So far the jury is out on what this has really done for us.

Here is an updated link to the Webpage for the Clan Ewing DNA Project for those who may be interested: http://www.clanewing.org/DNA_Project/index_Y-DNA.html

Posted by: UlsterScotNutt 15-Jul-2008, 07:47 AM
QUOTE (MacEoghainn @ 14-Jul-2008, 07:01 PM)
I have attached a report (I hope) that will give everyone an idea of how complex this stuff can get, and yet how much progress can be made through DNA testing.

This report is by Dr. David N. Ewing, MD, who is the gentleman in charge of the Clan Ewing DNA study mentioned in my original post. David and I are also seventh cousins once removed according to our conventional paper Genealogies (We are listed as SR and DN in the report.

DYF399X testing we did was an attempt to differentiate closely related groups of Ewing men. So far the jury is out on what this has really done for us.

Here is an updated link to the Webpage for the Clan Ewing DNA Project for those who may be interested: http://www.clanewing.org/DNA_Project/index_Y-DNA.html

Ok, After careful reading and thorough analysis of your Ewing DNA paper submitted I conclude.........................I have a headache!!! smile.gif

Posted by: MacEoghainn 15-Jul-2008, 08:26 AM
QUOTE (UlsterScotNutt @ 15-Jul-2008, 09:47 AM)
Ok, After careful reading and thorough analysis of your Ewing DNA paper submitted I conclude.........................I have a headache!!! smile.gif

It's like reading a Home Stereo manual translated (badly) from a foreign language. You know it's telling you something you might like to know, but it makes absolutely no sense what-so-ever! unsure.gif Dr. Ewing (a real live MD) tells me he is confused most of the time!

Posted by: Camac 15-Jul-2008, 08:49 AM
Gentlemen;

DNA testing is fine and all but there is a much simpler way of finding your relatives. You take your surname find which Clan, Tribe, or group your associated with and guess what somewhere down the line you are all related and your all cousins. Simple. I'm a Campbell so as far as I'm concerned all the other Campbells are my cousins . Who knows I might even be related to Queen Elizabeth as she is related to the Stewards who are related to the Bruce who married his sister off to a Campbell. I kinda like the sound of His Royal Highness Prince Camac. Enough joking around. As I said DNA testing is fine and all but it has its' limits. I watched 60 mins when they did a segment on it . A black woman from NJ and a white cattle rancher from Missouri were cousins. They also tried to trace her lineage back to Africa and it ended up she was either from Sierra Leone, Gambia, or Nigeria. Most blacks in the US. can trace their origin to the bulge of Africa because that is where the slave trade was established.


Camac.

Posted by: UlsterScotNutt 15-Jul-2008, 09:06 AM
It is even simpler than that, we all are descendents of one person, all cousins , all related.
Heck, after the last ice age you had about 60,000 individuals living in Europe major and now you have 300 million and the vast majority are not immigrants but of the 60k already there.

DNA testing is a tool.

USN

Posted by: MacEoghainn 15-Jul-2008, 10:40 AM
QUOTE (Camac @ 15-Jul-2008, 10:49 AM)
.....I'm a Campbell........

Camac.

Camac,

That explains a lot, you're an "evil" Campbell! laugh.gif If the Ewings are really part of Clan MacEwen then....."Give us our land back"!!!

QUOTE
Swene MacEwen, 9th and last of Otter (the last Chief), granted, in 1432, lands of Otter to Duncan Campbell of Lochow in repayment for overdue loans, and resigned the Barony of Otter to James I. It was returned to him until his death with remainder to Celestine, son and heir of Duncan Campbell. In 1493, James V confirmed the barony of Otter to Colin Campbell, Second Earl of Argyll and thereafter Otter remained in possession of the Campbells.

The manner in which the Clan MacEwen lands were lost suggests that Swene MacEwen was a victim of the Campbell facility to exploit the law to their own benefit at the detriment of simpler neighbors.

Without lands, the MacEwens became a broken clan and found their way to many districts. Many settled in the lands of their cousins an neighbors - the MacLachlans. A large number are known to have settled in Lennox County while others went further afield to Lochaber, Perth, Skye and the Lowlands, including Galloway. Other MacEwens stayed where they were swearing allegiance to the Earl of Argyll, some eventually becoming hereditary bards and sennachies to the Campbell Chiefs of Glenorchy. Finally, other MacEwens settled along the shores of Loch Lomond, probably before the end of the 15th century. Records from around 1513 indicate that the MacEwens had been pretty well dispersed from their homeland.
From the: http://www.cmana.net/macewen.html#macewen1


Seriously,

DNA testing is only one tool in the Genealogists (amateur or professional) toolbox. DNA testing is still really in its infancy. For instance in the Ewing DNA study I have a very distant cousin in Michigan, for which there is no possible way we are related closer than 10 generations, and yet we have identical at 37 marker DNA results (I call him my "Doppleganger").

Posted by: Camac 15-Jul-2008, 11:36 AM
QUOTE (MacEoghainn @ 15-Jul-2008, 11:40 AM)
QUOTE (Camac @ 15-Jul-2008, 10:49 AM)
.....I'm a Campbell........

Camac.

Camac,

That explains a lot, you're an "evil" Campbell! laugh.gif If the Ewings are really part of Clan MacEwen then....."Give us our land back"!!!

QUOTE
Swene MacEwen, 9th and last of Otter (the last Chief), granted, in 1432, lands of Otter to Duncan Campbell of Lochow in repayment for overdue loans, and resigned the Barony of Otter to James I. It was returned to him until his death with remainder to Celestine, son and heir of Duncan Campbell. In 1493, James V confirmed the barony of Otter to Colin Campbell, Second Earl of Argyll and thereafter Otter remained in possession of the Campbells.

The manner in which the Clan MacEwen lands were lost suggests that Swene MacEwen was a victim of the Campbell facility to exploit the law to their own benefit at the detriment of simpler neighbors.

Without lands, the MacEwens became a broken clan and found their way to many districts. Many settled in the lands of their cousins an neighbors - the MacLachlans. A large number are known to have settled in Lennox County while others went further afield to Lochaber, Perth, Skye and the Lowlands, including Galloway. Other MacEwens stayed where they were swearing allegiance to the Earl of Argyll, some eventually becoming hereditary bards and sennachies to the Campbell Chiefs of Glenorchy. Finally, other MacEwens settled along the shores of Loch Lomond, probably before the end of the 15th century. Records from around 1513 indicate that the MacEwens had been pretty well dispersed from their homeland.
From the: http://www.cmana.net/macewen.html#macewen1


Seriously,

DNA testing is only one tool in the Genealogists (amateur or professional) toolbox. DNA testing is still really in its infancy. For instance in the Ewing DNA study I have a very distant cousin in Michigan, for which there is no possible way we are related closer than 10 generations, and yet we have identical at 37 marker DNA results (I call him my "Doppleganger").

MacEoghainn;

Sorry Old Boy, you should have read the fine print.Campbell comes from the Gaelic Cam Buel (Crooked Mouth) emphasis on the Crooked. They didn't get to be the Largest, Wealthiest, and most Powerful Clan by being Mr. Nice. They also took lessons from the MacArthur (which I was adopted by). Steal the nickers off your grandma they would with her still in them. angel_not.gif rolleyes.gif laugh.gif

Camac.

Posted by: TamiMcLeod 29-Aug-2008, 10:42 AM
My family has been doing DNA for years for the MacLeods. The clan saids that many people who came under the protection of a castle, took the name.. like smiths came to say McInnes castle and took their name out of honor cause they gave protection, and have no McIness in their blood..

there are so many people who don't even have Scottish blood in them and have the last name of a Scottish name.

Also so many people say they are a pure scott.. when it was in the blood 5 or more gen back.. that doesn't make then a pure scott and maybe even makes them no scott. I see this alot. If you live in Scotland, then you know Scotts do not call other people with a bit of scott in them, Scotsman.. I

Posted by: heartsong 24-Sep-2014, 06:51 AM
It's interesting with all of the advances in Genealogy that no one has posted on here in a while. I recently did the ancestry.com DNA profiling and was only mildly surprised at what it said. I know my moms family is from southern Germany/Black Forest region which is the 50% listed below. I also know my grandfathers, grandfather is from Essex, England so 28% is not surprising either.
The smaller amounts come from distance between me and any ancestor that could easily have immigrated to one of the more prominent DNA marker regions I carry.
European
Europe West 50%
Great Britain 28%
Ireland 6%
Italy/Greece 6%
Iberian Peninsula 3%
European Jewish 3%
Scandinavia 2%
Finland/Northwest Russia < 1%
West Asia
Caucasus 2%

The only thing they missed in the ancestor that is Native American, but since not everyone in every family carries the same dna, one of my parents, siblings, cousins, uncles, etc might have those genes show up if they have the test done. All I have to do is convince them to spit into a little cup.

Now all I have to do is figure out who my Irish, Italian/Greek ancestors are. laugh.gif

Here's a basic video on how the test worked.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4kLUoam8ik

Posted by: munchkin5450 26-Sep-2014, 06:34 AM
Very interesting. I've wondered about the DNA testing...like how accurate is it; what do you need to do to have the testing done; is it expensive; and how long does it take to get the results.

My maternal grandfather started tracing that side of our family tree many years ago. When he passed, his son (my uncle) took up where he left off. My sister now has the accumulated information and was able to make the final connections with the help of ancestry.com. We know and have documentation that two of my ancestors came over on the Mayflower and were married by Capt. John Smith. My sister told me that she has an unbroken line all the way to Charlemagne!

She has only been able to go back a few generations for my father's side, though. She doesn't have the wealth of information available.


Posted by: heartsong 26-Sep-2014, 11:18 AM
I was also wondering about accuracy, but it seems accurate based on what I know for general regions of my ethnic groups. As they collect more and more DNA it will probably enable more specific areas to be determined.

I wish I was able to trace any of my lines that far. I was able to connect with my paternal grandfathers male line, before I did the DNA test. It goes from Essex, England in the 1650s until 1850s. I'm glad I didn't have to go through all the records, I just have to read them for interesting facts.

The maternal lines of each branch are harder to find, since it seems like all the women in my family went by their middle names.

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