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Posted by: jbarron 01-May-2008, 01:08 PM
My family was originally from Scotland and I am hoping to take a vacation there sometime in the next few years. I would be interested in getting suggestions from everyone as to the best places to visit, nice places to stay, the best pubs and interesting things to see.

biggrin.gif

Posted by: Camac 01-May-2008, 01:53 PM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 01-May-2008, 02:08 PM)
My family was originally from Scotland and I am hoping to take a vacation there sometime in the next few years. I would be interested in getting suggestions from everyone as to the best places to visit, nice places to stay, the best pubs and interesting things to see.

biggrin.gif

Just get off the plane at Glasgow get in a car and drive for you have truly landed in paradise and where ever you go your home.

Camac.

Posted by: jbarron 01-May-2008, 02:42 PM
That sounds wonderful. Perhaps I should only get a one way ticket. ;-)

Posted by: John Clements 01-May-2008, 02:54 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 01-May-2008, 02:53 PM)
QUOTE (jbarron @ 01-May-2008, 02:08 PM)
My family was originally from Scotland and I am hoping to take a vacation there sometime in the next few years. I would be interested in getting suggestions from everyone as to the best places to visit, nice places to stay, the best pubs and interesting things to see.

biggrin.gif

Just get off the plane at Glasgow get in a car and drive for you have truly landed in paradise and where ever you go your home.

Camac.

jbarron, can I go too?
Hey Camac were you with us when we were Scotland Bound, (why it sounds like a song), because thatís exactly what we did when we went a few years back. No advance reservations, just a ďstandard shift carĒ (which was a lot less expensive to rent, rather then a automatic), B&Bs all the way, and of course some money in our pockets.
To call Scotland enchanting would be a gorse understatement. The West coast, Oban, Mull, the Istle Sky, and the of course the Highlands, (why itís enough to me start crying again) Anyway I canít wait to go back, except this time I just might stay.
PS: I hope the ďMigiesĒ (if that how itís spelled) arenít out, and that you can adapt to driving on the other side of the road, it can be a little tricky. Oh yes, Edinburgh is a happening. My Mom came from Paisley, and there is a 13th century Abby there that almost converted me. Will get back with some more info later.
JC

Posted by: jbarron 01-May-2008, 03:34 PM
Sure John - the more the merrier! My favorite trips are the ones where one doesn't have everything pre-scheduled and the map takes you unexpected and interesting places.

I suspect I could spend several weeks just wandering. I doubt I'd have a job when I came home though.

Posted by: Camac 01-May-2008, 06:35 PM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 01-May-2008, 04:34 PM)
Sure John - the more the merrier! My favorite trips are the ones where one doesn't have everything pre-scheduled and the map takes you unexpected and interesting places.

I suspect I could spend several weeks just wandering. I doubt I'd have a job when I came home though.

jbarron;
On my first trip back to Scotland in 1963 I had a car waiting for me at Prestwick Airport. I drove to Troon visited with my cousins for 3 days and then my cousin Marilyn and I took off on a motor tour of Scotland. We drove due east until we hit Edinburgh and then north to Dundee, Arbroath, Aberdeen, Inverness and points in between. We then turnd south and west down Loch Ness stopping at Urqhart Castle (looking for Nessy) on down to Fort Augustus then into the Grampians. From there we continued SW to Glasgow and back to Troon. It was one of the best 3 weeks of my life. I'll tell you about the last trip in October 07 another time.



Camac.

Posted by: jbarron 02-May-2008, 11:43 AM
jbarron;
On my first trip back to Scotland in 1963 I had a car waiting for me at Prestwick Airport. I drove to Troon visited with my cousins for 3 days and then my cousin Marilyn and I took off on a motor tour of Scotland. We drove due east until we hit Edinburgh and then north to Dundee, Arbroath, Aberdeen, Inverness and points in between. We then turnd south and west down Loch Ness stopping at Urqhart Castle (looking for Nessy) on down to Fort Augustus then into the Grampians. From there we continued SW to Glasgow and back to Troon. It was one of the best 3 weeks of my life. I'll tell you about the last trip in October 07 another time.

(BTW, how does one include a quote?)

Camac -

Your trip sounded terrific - what was your favorite place out of all that you visited? What was your most interesting experience? You mentioned Troon wasn't too far from Kilmarnock?

I'd love to hear about the second trip as well...please please!

Posted by: Camac 02-May-2008, 12:16 PM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 02-May-2008, 12:43 PM)
jbarron;
On my first trip back to Scotland in 1963 I had a car waiting for me at Prestwick Airport. I drove to Troon visited with my cousins for 3 days and then my cousin Marilyn and I took off on a motor tour of Scotland. We drove due east until we hit Edinburgh and then north to Dundee, Arbroath, Aberdeen, Inverness and points in between. We then turnd south and west down Loch Ness stopping at Urqhart Castle (looking for Nessy) on down to Fort Augustus then into the Grampians. From there we continued SW to Glasgow and back to Troon. It was one of the best 3 weeks of my life. I'll tell you about the last trip in October 07 another time.

(BTW, how does one include a quote?)

Camac -

Your trip sounded terrific - what was your favorite place out of all that you visited? What was your most interesting experience? You mentioned Troon wasn't too far from Kilmarnock?

I'd love to hear about the second trip as well...please please!

jbarron;

First things first:- to post a quote just click the quote box in the upper right of a posting.
Kilmarnock is about 10 miles or so north -east of Troon, just over the hill.
It's hard to say what was the best part of that first trip. The most moving was standing on Culloden Moor even for a 21 year old it brought tears to my eyes. Both my birth family and my adopted family fought there. The birth family for the English and the adopted for Charlie. Even now 45 years after I can still vividly remember all of it. Both my Father and step-Father were British Commandos and I visited their Memorial at Speen Bridge and their training ground at Achnacarrie. My Father never made it back from the War.The Scottish people are the greatest folk on Earth and you will be made most welcome where ever you go.
Next week I will tell you about this last trip for it was very special. I hope you like long winded stories.

Camac thumbs_up.gif thumbs_up.gif

PS. Look in my profile pictures and there is one from Loch Tummel.

Posted by: Lady of Avalon 03-May-2008, 11:25 AM
Hi jbaron,

We've been to Scotland and let me tell you we'll go back in a very near future for this is where we are planning to go renew our wedding vows on our 25th wedding anniversay. So I think you guess how I feel about this wonderful country.

Our trip there was just like the others described to you we toured the country on car and slept in B&B's all the way through. Even though we prepared and itinerary we knew that sometimes things can change along the way. My best advice to you if I may is buy yourself a booklet guide. The one that I think is most complete and efficient is the same that I advise ctbard and UlsterScotNutt to buy it's the Michelin Green Guide of Scotland. This book is not too big and easy to carry espiacially when travelling light.
This is a museum country so there is plenty to see, to me I would prefer to let you discover it by yourself otherwise if I tell you all that I saw, the wonder of discovery and exploring will not be the same anymore because you'll already know what to expect.
And the fun in travelling is discovering and exploring and I wouldn't want to spoil the fun for you.
If you're interested to look I have a few pics of Scotland in my profile I invite you to look them up .LOA

Posted by: scotborn 03-May-2008, 01:30 PM
Anyone visiting scotland should be warned to stay away from aberdeen, its a right sh*thole.

Posted by: Camac 03-May-2008, 01:40 PM
QUOTE (scotborn @ 03-May-2008, 02:30 PM)
Anyone visiting scotland should be warned to stay away from aberdeen, its a right sh*thole.

When I was there in the 60s' it was beautiful (The Granite City) I guess things have changed since it became an "Oil Town".


Camac.

Posted by: John Clements 08-May-2008, 09:35 AM
Hi again jabarron,
If youíre at all like me, and you enjoy seeing castle ruins, Scotland is the place to be. Anyway, there are two castles that we enjoyed the most in Scotland, simply because they hadnít been ďgentrifiedĒ yet, (as in they are still ruins).
The first castle is called Kilchurn Castle, which is located on a small island at the Southern end of Loc Awe. Itís a grand place to enjoy a picnic lunch, because you can walk to it over a small stone bridge at the end of the Loc. What makes it great is, that itís surrounded by mountains and its as serene as it could be.
The other unspoiled Castle ruin is called, Storm Castle, itís a small ruin located in South West Rose, on Loch Carron, (were talking serenity here too). And if you like you can visit a small Kilt makers shop, just down the line from there.
From there you can drive over the highest mountain in Great Briton, to Apple Cross, (which is a small fishing village on the Irish Sea). Itís an adventure that you wonít soon forget, if ever. At Apple Cross, fish and chips, and a pint, (if you like) will be waiting for you.
(I could go on, but Iíd rather go back.)
I hope the whether is in your favor, when you go, but even if it isnít. Iím sure you will enjoy yourself anyway.

Oh yes, one of the best B&B that we stayed at is called: The Old Manse, which is also located at Loch Carron ROSS-SHIRE IV54 8YP, (what ever that means). Phone# (01520) 72208: Ask for Trevor, Heís English, but heís a hoot.

Later,
JC

Posted by: Camac 08-May-2008, 12:05 PM
JC. Kilchurn is my ancestral home. There are more castles in Scotland than any other European country.

Camac

Posted by: jbarron 08-May-2008, 12:08 PM
That sounds wonderful!! I have copied down all the information and will keep it for future reference when (not if smile.gif ) we go to Scotland.

Both the castles would be great to see - the less gentrified, the better in some respects. I can also very much appreciate serene and no big crowds.

The fish and chips (and a few pints) would be lovely!

Thank you for the suggestions. I really appreciate it. biggrin.gif

Posted by: jbarron 08-May-2008, 12:16 PM
QUOTE (John Clements @ 08-May-2008, 08:35 AM)
Hi again jabarron,
If youíre at all like me, and you enjoy seeing castle ruins, Scotland is the place to be. Anyway, there are two castles that we enjoyed the most in Scotland, simply because they hadnít been ďgentrifiedĒ yet, (as in they are still ruins).
The first is castle is called Kilchurn Castle, which it is located on a small island at the Southern end of Loc Awe. Itís a grand place to enjoy a picnic lunch, because you can walk to it over a small stone bridge at the end of the Loc. What makes it great is, that itís surrounded by mountains and ití as serene as it could be.
The other unspoiled Castle ruin is called, Storm Castle, itís a small ruin located in South West Rose, on Loch Carron, (were talking serenity here too). And if you like you can visit a small Kilt makers shop, just down the line from there.
From there you can drive over the highest mountain in Great Briton, to Apple Cross, (which is a small fishing village on the Irish Sea). Itís an adventure that you wonít soon forget, if ever. At Apple Cross, fish and chips, and a pint, (if you like) will be waiting for you.
(I could go on, but Iíd rather go back.)
I hope the whether is in your favor, when you go, but even if it isnít. Iím sure you will enjoy yourself anyway.

Oh yes, one of the best B&B that we stayed at is called: The Old Manse, which is also located at Loch Carron ROSS-SHIRE IV54 8YP, (what ever that means). Phone# (01520) 72208: Ask for Trevor, Heís English, but heís a hoot.

Later,
JC

I was curious...did you stay in a lot of B&B's on your trip? Were they generally pretty nice and easy to find? I rather stay at those than at a hotel as it's more laidback and more personalized. I've heard people are generally pretty friendly so it would be fun to meet some of the local folks as well.

Just curious what your impressions were.

Posted by: jbarron 08-May-2008, 12:20 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 02-May-2008, 11:16 AM)
It was one of the best 3 weeks of my life. I'll tell you about the last trip in October 07 another time.

Next week I will tell you about this last trip for it was very special. I hope you like long winded stories.


I am up for hearing all your stories of your travels if you're up for writing it all down for us to read.

Maybe it would be easier to do "chapters" so we could follow along but not burn you out? biggrin.gif




Posted by: jbarron 08-May-2008, 12:25 PM
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 03-May-2008, 10:25 AM)
Hi jbaron,

We've been to Scotland and let me tell you we'll go back in a very near future for this is where we are planning to go renew our wedding vows on our 25th wedding anniversay. So I think you guess how I feel about this wonderful country.

Our trip there was just like the others described to you we toured the country on car and slept in B&B's all the way through. Even though we prepared and itinerary we knew that sometimes things can change along the way. My best advice to you if I may is buy yourself a booklet guide. The one that I think is most complete and efficient is the same that I advise ctbard and UlsterScotNutt to buy it's the Michelin Green Guide of Scotland. This book is not too big and easy to carry espiacially when travelling light.
This is a museum country so there is plenty to see, to me I would prefer to let you discover it by yourself otherwise if I tell you all that I saw, the wonder of discovery and exploring will not be the same anymore because you'll already know what to expect.
And the fun in travelling is discovering and exploring and I wouldn't want to spoil the fun for you.
If you're interested to look I have a few pics of Scotland in my profile I invite you to look them up .LOA

That's very romantic. love.gif Congratulations! You're very lucky.

Thank you for the tip on the Michelin Guide. I will look for that at the bookstore.

Posted by: John Clements 08-May-2008, 05:22 PM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 08-May-2008, 01:16 PM)
QUOTE (John Clements @ 08-May-2008, 08:35 AM)
Hi again jabarron,
If youíre at all like me, and you enjoy seeing castle ruins, Scotland is the place to be.† Anyway, there are two castles that we enjoyed the most in Scotland, simply because they hadnít been ďgentrifiedĒ yet, (as in they are still ruins).
The first is castle is called Kilchurn Castle, which it is located on a small island at the Southern end of Loc Awe. Itís a grand place to enjoy a picnic lunch, because you can walk to it over a small stone bridge at the end of the Loc. What makes it great is, that itís surrounded by mountains and ití as serene as it could be.
The other unspoiled Castle ruin is called, Storm Castle, itís a small ruin located in South West Rose, on Loch Carron, (were talking serenity here too). And if you like you can visit a small Kilt makers shop, just down the line from there.
From there you can drive over the highest mountain in Great Briton, to Apple Cross, (which is a small fishing village on the Irish Sea). Itís an adventure that you wonít soon forget, if ever. At Apple Cross, fish and chips, and a pint, (if you like) will be waiting for you.
(I could go on, but Iíd rather go back.)
I hope the whether is in your favor, when you go, but even if it isnít. Iím sure you will enjoy yourself anyway.

Oh yes, one of the best B&B that we stayed at is called: The Old Manse, which is also located at Loch Carron ROSS-SHIRE IV54 8YP, (what ever that means). Phone# (01520) 72208: Ask for Trevor, Heís English, but heís a hoot.

Later,
JC

I was curious...did you stay in a lot of B&B's on your trip? Were they generally pretty nice and easy to find? I rather stay at those than at a hotel as it's more laidback and more personalized. I've heard people are generally pretty friendly so it would be fun to meet some of the local folks as well.

Just curious what your impressions were.

Yes jabarron, we did stay at B&B's for the most part, although we did only booked two B&Bís in advance. Both which were in Glasgow, the day we landed, and the night before we took off. (I canít remember the name of that particular place), but there are B&B listings are all over the internet. In fact what we did was, to rough out a driving rout, and print out the names and phone numbers of a lot of B&Bís, that were along the way, and then we just checked them out as we went. I guess depending upon the time of year you're traveling, so goes weather they have vacancies or not? Anyway we went the last two weeks in June, and it wasnít a problem.
By the way you can take the Jacobite Steam Train, (which is the train that was used as a prop, in the first Harry Potter film). It takes the better party of the day, as itís around trip, going from Fort William, to a little fishing village on the west coast, called Mallaig, which is another great place for a few pints and some sea food. The scenery from the train is special. Do a little home work in advance, and you pretty much canít go wrong?
JC

Posted by: Camac 09-May-2008, 07:42 AM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 08-May-2008, 01:20 PM)
QUOTE (Camac @ 02-May-2008, 11:16 AM)
It was one of the best 3 weeks of my life. I'll tell you about the last trip in October 07 another time.

Next week I will tell you about this last trip for it was very special. I hope you like long winded stories.


I am up for hearing all your stories of your travels if you're up for writing it all down for us to read.

Maybe it would be easier to do "chapters" so we could follow along but not burn you out? biggrin.gif

jbarron.

Before I tell you about the Trip to Scotland in Oct. 07 I will have to give you a brief background.

Chapter #1;

I was born David Campbell on the 30th September 1942 in Troon Ayrshire Scotland, My Father was born David Campbell in 1914 in Dundee, Scotland. his father was also David Campbell etc.etc. My Father was killed in the War in May 1944 and in 1946 my Mother remarried. a Canadian named Albert Raymond (Ray) McArthur. He adopted me and I became David Campbell-McArthur. I knew of my biological father but I didn't know about him as no-one spoke of him.On my first trip to Scotland in 1963 I was in Dundee but I never even thought to look for his family. The foolishness of youth. Five years ago when I turned 60 it became imperitive to me to find the Campbell Family and after searching all that time I finally succeeded. That is the reason for my last trip Home. I'll fill in more in the next chapter.


Camac.

Posted by: jbarron 14-May-2008, 03:21 PM
QUOTE (John Clements @ 08-May-2008, 04:22 PM)
[/QUOTE]
Yes jabarron, we did stay at B&B's for the most part, although we did only booked two B&Bís in advance. Both which were in Glasgow, the day we landed, and the night before we took off. (I canít remember the name of that particular place), but there are B&B listings are all over the internet. In fact what we did was, to rough out a driving rout, and print out the names and phone numbers of a lot of B&Bís, that were along the way, and then we just checked them out as we went. I guess depending upon the time of year you're traveling, so goes weather they have vacancies or not? Anyway we went the last two weeks in June, and it wasnít a problem.
By the way you can take the Jacobite Steam Train, (which is the train that was used as a prop, in the first Harry Potter film). It takes the better party of the day, as itís around trip, going from Fort William, to a little fishing village on the west coast, called Mallaig, which is another great place for a few pints and some sea food. The scenery from the train is special. Do a little home work in advance, and you pretty much canít go wrong?
JC

That's sounds very nice! I'd love to take the train like you suggested - would be a relaxing way to see everything and fun since it's an old train.

I see you travel pretty much the same way I do...off the beaten track, enjoying quiet beautiful places and seeing what delicious goodies I can find to eat and drink.

I am ready to go - just need to save up for the airplane ticket. (ouch)

Thanks!

Posted by: jbarron 14-May-2008, 03:40 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 09-May-2008, 06:42 AM)
Before I tell you about the Trip to Scotland in Oct. 07 I will have to give you a brief background.

Chapter #1;

I was born David Campbell on the 30th September 1942 in Troon Ayrshire Scotland, My Father was born David Campbell in 1914 in Dundee, Scotland. his father was also David Campbell etc.etc. My Father was killed in the War in May 1944 and in 1946 my Mother remarried. a Canadian named Albert Raymond (Ray) McArthur. He adopted me and I became David Campbell-McArthur. I knew of my biological father but I didn't know about him as no-one spoke of him.On my first trip to Scotland in 1963 I was in Dundee but I never even thought to look for his family. The foolishness of youth. Five years ago when I turned 60 it became imperitive to me to find the Campbell Family and after searching all that time I finally succeeded. That is the reason for my last trip Home. I'll fill in more in the next chapter.


Camac.

Now I see how you got the name Camac - very clever!

I find it interesting that you are the third (or more?) David Campbell in your family. Was it a tradition, you think, to have the same name repeated once in each subsequent generation? That must have been common because I have at least three generations of "John Stewart".

That's great you found your family on your second trip. What resources did you use to track them down? That must have been exciting to get to meet them in person.

I agree with you...as we get older, sometimes it becomes important to reconnect to our roots and know more about where/who we came from.

But, you can tell more about that in the next chapter. ;-)

Posted by: fionadunbar 15-May-2008, 07:22 AM
I WENT TO SCOTLAND IN 2007 AND BOOKED A WING IN A LOVELY LITTLE CASTLE FOR A WEEK .IT'S CALLED FORDYCE CASTLE.

WE USED A MIX OF ACCOMODATION ,I LIKED TOURING BUT ALSO LIKE HAVING OUR OWN PLACE, WHERE I COULD COOK AND WASH CLOTHS , LIVING IN A CASTLE FOR A WEEK WAS A DREAM COME TRUE.IT WAS ALSO IN THE HEART OF MY FAMILYS HISTORY SO IT WAS PERFECT FOR US.

I HAVE A COTTAGE BOOKED UP IN BETTY HILL IN 2009 I USE 'WHICH COTTAGE.COM' .
THE COTTAGES IN IRELAND ARE INCREDIBLE VALUE

Posted by: jbarron 15-May-2008, 08:46 AM
QUOTE (fionadunbar @ 15-May-2008, 06:22 AM)
I WENT TO SCOTLAND IN 2007 AND BOOKED A WING IN A LOVELY LITTLE CASTLE FOR A WEEK .IT'S CALLED FORDYCE CASTLE.

WE USED A MIX OF ACCOMODATION ,I LIKED TOURING BUT ALSO LIKE HAVING OUR OWN PLACE, WHERE I COULD COOK AND WASH CLOTHS , LIVING IN A CASTLE FOR A WEEK WAS A DREAM COME TRUE.IT WAS ALSO IN THE HEART OF MY FAMILYS HISTORY AND ONCE OWNED BY DUNBARS SO IT WAS PERFECT FOR US.

I HAVE A COTTAGE BOOKED UP IN BETTY HILL IN 2009 I USE 'WHICH COTTAGE.COM' .
THE COTTAGES IN IRELAND ARE INCREDIBLE VALUE

Thank you very much for the URL and for letting me know about the castles. I will definitely check it out. thumbs_up.gif

Posted by: Camac 15-May-2008, 09:39 AM
jbarron;

Chpter 2.
It seems that as far back as we can trace there has always been a David Campbell. That is to say somewhere in the mix of given names there is David ie. Sean David, David Erskin, David Moir, James William David, etc.ad nauseum. I have a cousin here in Georgetown (Ontario) who is into geneology and with her help we went looking. After 5 years of searching (not all the time) we were hitting brick walls. This was due , as we found out to a spelling mistake some Clerk in the Registra Office had made with my paternal grandmothers name. They had her as Isabella Mair Campbell and it should have been Isabella Moir Campbell. The Mair family in Scotland are decendents of the Picts and they are the oldest Earldom in the U.K. So here I am thinking I'm of the aristocracy laugh.gif laugh.gif As I said we were up against a brick wall when my cousin said why not try getting in touch with a Dundee Newspaper we have nothing to loose. I picked the Dundee Courier,mainly because it was the first one listed, and a chap named Richard Rooney said he would help if he could. On May 19 2007 he e-mailed me and said send me your address, phone number, e-mail and a photograph it is going in the morning edition.
At 9:00am on the 20th Richard e-mailed me to say that it looked like I had found my Family after 60 years. Twenty minutes later my phone rang Long Distance Overseas, when I answered my cousin Moir Greene introduced herself and we both started crying. To put it bluntly it was 'BLOODY MARVELOUS." Soon after that the e-mails from other cousins started pouring in. I had 7 first cousins and 40 second and third cousins all in and around Dundee. Plans were immediately started for me to go Home and meet them. I will tell you more about the great time I had in the next chapter.


Camac.

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 17-May-2008, 12:51 PM
We flew into Edinburgh and stayed one night in a B&B in Falkirk, just outside of the Falkirk Wheel, http://www.thefalkirkwheel.co.uk/

After that, we moved onto Aberfoyle and stayed at Macdonald Forest Hills Hotel & Resort, http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/foresthills/index.htm?macd_source_link=http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/hotels/location_hotels.htm and used that as our base to explore each day. It gave us an easy ride into Stirling and also was close enough to reach the Highlands and explore that. We did drive all the way up to Isle of Skye from there but that was a killer ride for just one day. We should have stayed on Skye for the one night and head back the next day.

If you do go to Aberfoyle, stop at the little butcher shop in front of the woolen center outlet. They make the best bridies. Do not stop at the restaurant right before coming into Aberfolyle. It's at the cross roads of Aberfolye and Loch Lomand. The food and service was terrible. Better places in downtown Aberfolyle.

Traveling up the A-82 to reach the Highlands, make sure you stop at The Green Welly in Tyndrum, http://www.scotchwhisky.net/retail/retailers/green_welly.htm . First of all, it's the last place for many miles, before you can make a stop again. You can fill up your car, have lunch and do some shopping there. Fun place.

I have many pictures in the Gallery of the castles and some of the scenery we passed along the way. I have explanations with all the pictures.

Scotland was very expensive but I wouldn't pass up a return trip.

Posted by: jbarron 19-May-2008, 02:58 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 15-May-2008, 08:39 AM)
jbarron;

Chpter 2.
It seems that as far back as we can trace there has always been a David Campbell. That is to say somewhere in the mix of given names there is David ie. Sean David, David Erskin, David Moir, James William David, etc.ad nauseum. I have a cousin here in Georgetown (Ontario) who is into geneology and with her help we went looking. After 5 years of searching (not all the time) we were hitting brick walls. This was due , as we found out to a spelling mistake some Clerk in the Registra Office had made with my paternal grandmothers name. They had her as Isabella Mair Campbell and it should have been Isabella Moir Campbell. The Mair family in Scotland are decendents of the Picts and they are the oldest Earldom in the U.K. So here I am thinking I'm of the aristocracy laugh.gif laugh.gif As I said we were up against a brick wall when my cousin said why not try getting in touch with a Dundee Newspaper we have nothing to loose. I picked the Dundee Courier,mainly because it was the first one listed, and a chap named Richard Rooney said he would help if he could. On May 19 2007 he e-mailed me and said send me your address, phone number, e-mail and a photograph it is going in the morning edition.
At 9:00am on the 20th Richard e-mailed me to say that it looked like I had found my Family after 60 years. Twenty minutes later my phone rang Long Distance Overseas, when I answered my cousin Moir Greene introduced herself and we both started crying. To put it bluntly it was 'BLOODY MARVELOUS." Soon after that the e-mails from other cousins started pouring in. I had 7 first cousins and 40 second and third cousins all in and around Dundee. Plans were immediately started for me to go Home and meet them. I will tell you more about the great time I had in the next chapter.


Camac.

That's an incredible story! I have encountered mis-spellings as well and it does make tracking people's names very difficult - but your persistence paid off well. That was great they put you in the newspaper and everyone found each other. I can only imagine how overwhelming (in a good way) that must have felt. Meeting them in person and going to visit must have been even better.

biggrin.gif

Posted by: jbarron 19-May-2008, 03:01 PM
QUOTE (A Shrule Egan @ 17-May-2008, 11:51 AM)
We flew into Edinburgh and stayed one night in a B&B in Falkirk, just outside of the Falkirk Wheel, http://www.thefalkirkwheel.co.uk/

After that, we moved onto Aberfoyle and stayed at Macdonald Forest Hills Hotel & Resort, http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/foresthills/index.htm?macd_source_link=http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/hotels/location_hotels.htm and used that as our base to explore each day. It gave us an easy ride into Stirling and also was close enough to reach the Highlands and explore that. We did drive all the way up to Isle of Skye from there but that was a killer ride for just one day. We should have stayed on Skye for the one night and head back the next day.

If you do go to Aberfoyle, stop at the little butcher shop in front of the woolen center outlet. They make the best bridies. Do not stop at the restaurant right before coming into Aberfolyle. It's at the cross roads of Aberfolye and Loch Lomand. The food and service was terrible. Better places in downtown Aberfolyle.

Traveling up the A-82 to reach the Highlands, make sure you stop at The Green Welly in Tyndrum, http://www.scotchwhisky.net/retail/retailers/green_welly.htm . First of all, it's the last place for many miles, before you can make a stop again. You can fill up your car, have lunch and do some shopping there. Fun place.

I have many pictures in the Gallery of the castles and some of the scenery we passed along the way. I have explanations with all the pictures.

Scotland was very expensive but I wouldn't pass up a return trip.

Thank you very much for the suggestions and all the great URLs. I will keep them for reference and hopefully get to see some of the places you've described. I'll also check out the pictures in the Gallery...one can never get enough of beautful Scottish scenery and castles.

mmmmmm....bridies....yummmmm!

Posted by: Finduella 24-May-2008, 08:25 AM
What is a Bridie??? That is my sister's name. We stayed at the Dornoch Hotel just before the Isle of Skye and walking distance from the amazing Eileen Doonon Castle, They had the most amazing fresh smoked kippers . Iv'e never had anything like them in my life and will never forget them !!!!!

I found a very good value Guest house in Edinburgh "Davenport house"eazy to google they have a 4 night for 3 deal from mon to thurs which brings the price down to out of town B+B price and is in a very nice quite part of town ,yet only 10 mins walk from Princess St. uphill but downhill on the way home, Edinburgh is best on foot and hilly so start walking . Only issue with The Davenport is the rooms are 2 floors up, we didn't mind at all.It is a beautifull old house and the breakfast fresh and yummy!

This part is a quote sorry I don't know how to use the quotes yet

"I find it interesting that you are the third (or more?) David Campbell in your family. Was it a tradition, you think, to have the same name repeated once in each subsequent generation? That must have been common because I have at least three generations of "John Stewart". "

My family tree is a thousand years old and we have John , Gavin, Patrick ,George Frederick again and again fo 100's of years, there is even a format . First son John , second George etc, and even though we didn't know this there is still John;s and Fred's in my generation. So if it goes for 3 generations could well be 20 further generations behind that !

Posted by: Camac 24-May-2008, 08:45 AM
QUOTE (Finduella @ 24-May-2008, 09:25 AM)
What is a Bridie??? That is my sister's name. We stayed at the Dornoch Hotel just before the Isle of Skye and walking distance from the amazing Eileen Doonon Castle, They had the most amazing fresh smoked kippers . Iv'e never had anything like them in my life and will never forget them !!!!!

I found a very good value Guest house in Edinburgh "Davenport house"eazy to google they have a 4 night for 3 deal from mon to thurs which brings the price down to out of town B+B price and is in a very nice quite part of town ,yet only 10 mins walk from Princess St. uphill but downhill on the way home, Edinburgh is best on foot and hilly so start walking . Only issue with The Davenport is the rooms are 2 floors up, we didn't mind at all.It is a beautifull old house and the breakfast fresh and yummy!

A bridie is "Food for the Gods". Its a pastry stuffed with meat and veggies. The best are an "Ingin Bridie" (Onion Bridie) The best ones along with the best "Black Puddin" also come from MacDonalds Butcher Shop on Lochee Road Dundee. If anyone every gets to Dundee go to that shop and order "Twa Plen Pehs an Ingin Bridie" (Two plain pies and an Onion Bridie"). Another food to try is an "Arbroath Smokie" (Smoked Haddock).


Camac

Posted by: Finduella 28-May-2008, 06:49 AM
Thanks for that camac. I'll definatly keeep a lookout for a bridie, I've tried the Arbrouth smokie ,which is out of this world. My own food discovery was "Cullen Skink" best place to try one is the fish and chip shop at the railway viaduct in Cullen. t is a soup made of poato leeks smoked fish and cream,mmmmmm yummy!

Posted by: jbarron 28-May-2008, 09:04 AM
QUOTE (Finduella @ 28-May-2008, 05:49 AM)
My own food discovery was "Cullen Skink" best place to try one is the fish and chip shop at the railway viaduct in Cullen. t is a soup made of poato leeks smoked fish and cream,mmmmmm yummy!

Finduella -

I have a recipe for Cullen Skink...if you're interested, I could post it on the Scottish recipe forum. I don't know if it will be as good as the one you had from Cullen but it's supposedly authentic. It sounds delicious!

biggrin.gif

Posted by: Finduella 29-May-2008, 07:41 AM
Oh yes please, I improvised when I got home ( in the kitchen I mean) so a real recipe would be great !

One thing we learned the hard way about the scottish is they are very punctual people in general and very much so about food.

We were caught out in Edinburgh with our evening meal. It was 1 minute past nine and we were refused service and found it very difficult to find meal after that, so be warned dinner stops at nine ( and that is in the capital!), I had read this in our guide book , but didn't reolize how firm they would be.

In the country we saw a sign saying }eggs for sale "2'o'clock sunday " and you can bet thats exactly what they meant.

I tried to buy eggs at a farm that had a "eggs for sale sign " and the farmer told me would only have "eggs for me" in 2 days time at 2pm go figure ???????

Another site I've just thought of is www.celticcastles.com it has a variety of castles in u.k and Ireland that are now b+b's or hotels. Of course a bit more expensive than a comon b+b but as you know I'm keen on Castle's and myself will stay at least one night in a Castle on my 2009 trip.

Posted by: Camac 29-May-2008, 09:42 AM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 28-May-2008, 10:04 AM)
Finduella -

I have a recipe for Cullen Skink...if you're interested, I could post it on the Scottish recipe forum. I don't know if it will be as good as the one you had from Cullen but it's supposedly authentic. It sounds delicious!

biggrin.gif

Hey Guys;
Ihave a recipes also for "Maw Broons' Cullen Skink. " Bluidy Marvellous.


Camac.

Posted by: jbarron 29-May-2008, 10:20 AM
QUOTE (Camac @ 29-May-2008, 08:42 AM)
QUOTE (jbarron @ 28-May-2008, 10:04 AM)
Finduella -

I have a recipe for Cullen Skink...if you're interested, I could post it on the Scottish recipe forum. I don't know if it will be as good as the one you had from Cullen but it's supposedly authentic. It sounds delicious!

biggrin.gif

Hey Guys;
Ihave a recipes also for "Maw Broons' Cullen Skink. " Bluidy Marvellous.


Camac.

If you'd care to - please post it on the recipe forum under Scottish recipes - I'd love to try it!

I'll put the other recipe on there tomorrow too as I don't have it with me.

Yum!

Posted by: jbarron 29-May-2008, 10:21 AM
Camac -

Chapter 3? biggrin.gif Please?

Posted by: Camac 29-May-2008, 01:11 PM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 29-May-2008, 11:21 AM)
Camac -

Chapter 3? biggrin.gif Please?

jbarron;

My friend I beg your indulgence as I have been remiss in writing more on my Trip to Scotland. The only excuse I have is that I have been swamped with work of a legal nature and have not really had time to sit and write. Please bear with me I shall write the 3rd chapter soon.

Camac.

Posted by: John Clements 29-May-2008, 05:14 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 29-May-2008, 02:11 PM)
QUOTE (jbarron @ 29-May-2008, 11:21 AM)
Camac -

Chapter 3?  biggrin.gif  Please?

jbarron;

My friend I beg your indulgence as I have been remiss in writing more on my Trip to Scotland. The only excuse I have is that I have been swamped with work of a legal nature and have not really had time to sit and write. Please bear with me I shall write the 3rd chapter soon.

Camac.

You know, sometimes you need a vacation from the vacation?
(Take all the time you need.)

JC

Posted by: Camac 31-May-2008, 10:23 AM
QUOTE (John Clements @ 29-May-2008, 06:14 PM)
QUOTE (Camac @ 29-May-2008, 02:11 PM)
QUOTE (jbarron @ 29-May-2008, 11:21 AM)
Camac -

Chapter 3?† biggrin.gif† Please?

jbarron;

My friend I beg your indulgence as I have been remiss in writing more on my Trip to Scotland. The only excuse I have is that I have been swamped with work of a legal nature and have not really had time to sit and write. Please bear with me I shall write the 3rd chapter soon.

Camac.

You know, sometimes you need a vacation from the vacation?
(Take all the time you need.)

JC

Chapter 3.

Well after six hours of being packed into a Flying Sardine Can I arrived at Glasgow Intern'l Airport at 9:30 in the a.m.. After about ten minutes in Immigration and 0 mins in Customs, they were not on duty and I could have smuggled an Atom Bomb into the country, I exited Arrivals arms full of Duty Free, suitcase in tow,to have my ears assailed by the screams of "DAVID,DAVID" followed by two 60 year old women tackling me while a man thumped my back. Thus I was welcomed by my cousin Alister, his wife Linda, and cousin Moira. Admist the hugs, tears, and kisses I was Home and with my Lost Family. Next was the trip to Dundee on the other side of Scotland. It was an 1 1/2 drive on secondary roads through the Scottish countryside, Glasgow to Stirling then North to Dundee crossing over the Tay on the Highway bridge and into Monofeith the suburb where Alister and Linda have a lovely home, not at all what I expected. The rest of the day was spent unpacking and getting settled in and talking for hours getting to know each other.The next morning I was awakened to a breakfast of Bacon and eggs and Black Pudding and coffee. I was definitely home. I had some duties to perform that first day so with Alister, Linda and Moira set off to fufill them. The first stop was "The Law (extinct volcano in the middle of Dundee) to pay Honour to my Father at the War Memorial perched on the summit. From there we went to the Family plot where my Grandparents and my Fathers' brothers and sisters are buried. Here I left a Plaque that read "Cpl. David Campbell, 2Bn., 48th Tank Regiment. Royal Armoured Corp. 15 May 1944, Deli Ibraham, Algiers.
A True Highland Warrior. From his Loving Scots=Canadian Son, David." So ends chapter 3.

PS. One thing the Scots cannae dae is make coffee.

Posted by: John Clements 31-May-2008, 01:41 PM
QUOTE (Camac @ 31-May-2008, 11:23 AM)

Chapter 3.

Well after six hours of being packed into a Flying Sardine Can I arrived at Glasgow Intern'l Airport at 9:30 in the a.m.. After about ten minutes in Immigration and 0 mins in Customs, they were not on duty and I could have smuggled an Atom Bomb into the country, I exited Arrivals arms full of Duty Free, suitcase in tow,to have my ears assailed by the screams of "DAVID,DAVID" followed by two 60 year old women tackling me while a man thumped my back. Thus I was welcomed by my cousin Alister, his wife Linda, and cousin Moira. Admist the hugs, tears, and kisses I was Home and with my Lost Family. Next was the trip to Dundee on the other side of Scotland. It was an 1 1/2 drive on secondary roads through the Scottish countryside, Glasgow to Stirling then North to Dundee crossing over the Tay on the Highway bridge and into Monofeith the suburb where Alister and Linda have a lovely home, not at all what I expected. The rest of the day was spent unpacking and getting settled in and talking for hours getting to know each other.The next morning I was awakened to a breakfast of Bacon and eggs and Black Pudding and coffee. I was definitely home. I had some duties to perform that first day so with Alister, Linda and Moira set off to fufill them. The first stop was "The Law (extinct volcano in the middle of Dundee) to pay Honour to my Father at the War Memorial perched on the summit. From there we went to the Family plot where my Grandparents and my Fathers' brothers and sisters are buried. Here I left a Plaque that read "Cpl. David Campbell, 2Bn., 48th Tank Regiment. Royal Armoured Corp. 15 May 1944, Deli Ibraham, Algiers.
A True Highland Warrior. From his Loving Scots=Canadian Son, David." So ends chapter 3.

PS. One thing the Scots cannae dae is make coffee.

Hey Camac, any chance of another chapter by bed time.


Posted by: Camac 31-May-2008, 03:13 PM
QUOTE (John Clements @ 31-May-2008, 02:41 PM)
QUOTE (Camac @ 31-May-2008, 11:23 AM)

Chapter 3.

Well after six hours of being packed into a Flying Sardine Can I arrived at Glasgow Intern'l Airport at 9:30 in the a.m.. After about ten minutes in Immigration and 0 mins in Customs, they were not on duty and I could have smuggled an Atom Bomb into the country, I exited Arrivals  arms full of Duty Free, suitcase in tow,to have my ears assailed by the screams of "DAVID,DAVID" followed by two 60 year old women tackling me while a man thumped my back. Thus I was welcomed by my cousin Alister, his wife Linda, and cousin Moira. Admist the hugs, tears, and kisses I was Home and with my Lost Family. Next was the trip to Dundee on the other side of Scotland. It was an 1 1/2 drive on secondary roads through the Scottish countryside, Glasgow to Stirling then North to Dundee crossing over the Tay on the Highway bridge and into Monofeith the suburb where Alister and Linda have a lovely home, not at all what I expected. The rest of the day was spent unpacking and getting settled in and talking for hours  getting to know each other.The next morning I was awakened to a breakfast of Bacon and eggs and Black Pudding and coffee. I was definitely home. I had some duties to perform that first day so with Alister, Linda and Moira set off to fufill them. The first stop was "The Law (extinct volcano in the middle of Dundee) to pay Honour to my Father at the War Memorial perched on the summit. From there we went to the Family plot where my Grandparents and my Fathers' brothers and sisters are buried. Here I left a Plaque that read  "Cpl. David Campbell, 2Bn., 48th Tank Regiment. Royal Armoured Corp.  15 May 1944, Deli Ibraham, Algiers.
A True Highland Warrior. From his Loving Scots=Canadian Son, David." So ends chapter 3.

PS.  One thing the Scots cannae dae is make coffee.

Hey Camac, any chance of another chapter by bed time.

JC.
No my friend not before bedtime but I will try for to-morrow.

Camac.

Posted by: A Shrule Egan 31-May-2008, 08:24 PM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 19-May-2008, 05:01 PM)
QUOTE (A Shrule Egan @ 17-May-2008, 11:51 AM)
We flew into Edinburgh and stayed one night in a B&B in Falkirk, just outside of the Falkirk Wheel, http://www.thefalkirkwheel.co.uk/

After that, we moved onto Aberfoyle and stayed at Macdonald Forest Hills Hotel & Resort, http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/foresthills/index.htm?macd_source_link=http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/hotels/location_hotels.htm and used that as our base to explore each day. It gave us an easy ride into Stirling and also was close enough to reach the Highlands and explore that. We did drive all the way up to Isle of Skye from there but that was a killer ride for just one day. We should have stayed on Skye for the one night and head back the next day.

If you do go to Aberfoyle, stop at the little butcher shop in front of the woolen center outlet. They make the best bridies. Do not stop at the restaurant right before coming into Aberfolyle. It's at the cross roads of Aberfolye and Loch Lomand. The food and service was terrible. Better places in downtown Aberfolyle.

Traveling up the A-82 to reach the Highlands, make sure you stop at The Green Welly in Tyndrum, http://www.scotchwhisky.net/retail/retailers/green_welly.htm . First of all, it's the last place for many miles, before you can make a stop again. You can fill up your car, have lunch and do some shopping there. Fun place.

I have many pictures in the Gallery of the castles and some of the scenery we passed along the way. I have explanations with all the pictures.

Scotland was very expensive but I wouldn't pass up a return trip.

Thank you very much for the suggestions and all the great URLs. I will keep them for reference and hopefully get to see some of the places you've described. I'll also check out the pictures in the Gallery...one can never get enough of beautful Scottish scenery and castles.

mmmmmm....bridies....yummmmm!

Here's a picture of the view we had outside the bedroom of the MacDonald Forest Hills Hotel & Resort in Aberfoyle.


Posted by: A Shrule Egan 31-May-2008, 09:20 PM
Here's another suggestion for a place to stay, at least some part of your trip to Scotland. http://www.lochsandglens.com/HotelInversnaid.asp

If you land in Edinburgh, you would drive up to Aberfoyle and take the one lane wide road about 30 miles to Loch Lomond and the hotel. The scenery is awesome along this road!! Only problem is, you have to drive back that 30 miles if you want to go check out anything else.

If you land in Glasgow, you would drive up to one of the sister hotels on the west side of Loch Lomond and take the ferry over to the hotel.

Posted by: Camac 01-Jun-2008, 10:20 AM
Chapter 4;

After the duties were finished we drove to downtown Dundee and walked around looking at the sights and doing a bit of shopping. We then went to Broughty Ferrie which is another suburb of Dundee and walked along the Tay front which is the old part of the Town . The day was spent mostly just walking about and enjoying ourselves talking about their lives and mine. We grew up so differently, me to the hustle and bustle of North America and them in the laid back life of Scotland. Oh how I envied them. I had arrived on Thursday morning seen Dundee on Friday and on the Saturday morning it was off to Arbroath Abbey the Place of Scotlands' Declaration of Independence. I have all kinds of Pictures of my trip but cannot upload then as the pixel count is to high, all 2.MB and up. Whilst in Arbroath we went to the waterfront and as we turned down this one street I was back in the 17th or 18th Century. It was a street of Fish Mongers and we stopped at one store to buy some Smokies (smoked Haddock) and some fresh Haddock for supper which was Finn and Haddie just like I remembered my Nanny (Grandmother) making. I was truly amoungst my own.
Sunday was the big day as a reunion of the Family had been planned and I was to meet all of my cousins. All 47, 8 1st cousins and the rest 2nd and 3rd. It was held at the Local, The Crown Pub, and needless to say a great time was had by all. It was here that I met Alisters' and Lindas' boys, Steven a Police Office, and Craig an award winning Restauranteur. The Guiness flowed freely and speeches were made and questions asked about my life and that of my Family. Everyone seemed very interested in hearing about my Girls and asking to see pictures of them. That Sunday was by far the best day I had in Scotland . So ends the reunion and the first 4 days. The real sightseeing started on Monday for Linda had planned a complete itinery for my remaining ten days.

Posted by: Lady of Avalon 02-Jun-2008, 05:57 PM
Hi jbarron,
I'll sneak in once in a while.
If you get the chance to do all of Scotland don't forget the Orkney's.
We took the ferry at Thurso early (I mean early) in the morning to Orkney Islands it's about a 2 hours crossing and what a view you'll get.

We took the P&O ferry company which is quite a big boat and so you are very comfortable if you want to snooze a bit and then get on deck so that you don't miss all.
There is some cliffs along the coast of Hoy and the boat pass just in front of the most breathtaking sight of a sea stack which they call "The Old Man of Hoy" it is fantastic the rock is about 450 ft high.
The boat land at Stromness which is the main city of the island once on the island there is so much to see.

There are some little shops downtown that are interesting to see.
You will find of course that everything is pretty much norse there,streets have vikings names as well as some stores.
The island is small but you have a lot to discover. There is the prehistoric village of Skara Brae which is very impressive as well as the megalithic stone circle Ring of Brogar dating the bronze age and also the neolithic cairn of Maes Howe where you can still see vikings runic grafittis on the stones. And many more sights like this.
If you tour Scotland don't miss this great place.
LOA

Posted by: jbarron 04-Jun-2008, 09:14 AM
QUOTE (Camac @ 29-May-2008, 12:11 PM)
QUOTE (jbarron @ 29-May-2008, 11:21 AM)
Camac -

Chapter 3?  biggrin.gif  Please?

jbarron;

My friend I beg your indulgence as I have been remiss in writing more on my Trip to Scotland. The only excuse I have is that I have been swamped with work of a legal nature and have not really had time to sit and write. Please bear with me I shall write the 3rd chapter soon.

Camac.

I understand completely - legal things take a lot of time and concentration. There is no hurry at all - just wanted to make sure you hadn't thought we had forgotten about you or had lost interest.

wink.gif

Posted by: jbarron 04-Jun-2008, 09:20 AM
QUOTE (Lady of Avalon @ 02-Jun-2008, 04:57 PM)
Hi jbarron,
I'll sneak in once in a while.
If you get the chance to do all of Scotland don't forget the Orkney's.
We took the ferry at Thurso early (I mean early) in the morning to Orkney Islands it's about a 2 hours crossing and what a view you'll get.

We took the P&O ferry company which is quite a big boat and so you are very comfortable if you want to snooze a bit and then get on deck so that you don't miss all.
There is some cliffs along the coast of Hoy and the boat pass just in front of the most breathtaking sight of a sea stack which they call "The Old Man of Hoy" it is fantastic the rock is about 450 ft high.
The boat land at Stromness which is the main city of the island once on the island there is so much to see.

There are some little shops downtown that are interesting to see.
You will find of course that everything is pretty much norse there,streets have vikings names as well as some stores.
The island is small but you have a lot to discover. There is the prehistoric village of Skara Brae which is very impressive as well as the megalithic stone circle Ring of Brogar dating the bronze age and also the neolithic cairn of Maes Howe where you can still see vikings runic grafittis on the stones. And many more sights like this.
If you tour Scotland don't miss this great place.
LOA

Wow - that sounds fascinating! I am ready to go! biggrin.gif

Thank you very much for the suggestions (I am compiling a list).

Posted by: jbarron 04-Jun-2008, 09:22 AM
QUOTE (A Shrule Egan @ 31-May-2008, 07:24 PM)
QUOTE (jbarron @ 19-May-2008, 05:01 PM)
QUOTE (A Shrule Egan @ 17-May-2008, 11:51 AM)
We flew into Edinburgh and stayed one night in a B&B in Falkirk, just outside of the Falkirk Wheel, http://www.thefalkirkwheel.co.uk/

After that, we moved onto Aberfoyle and stayed at Macdonald Forest Hills Hotel & Resort, http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/foresthills/index.htm?macd_source_link=http://www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk/hotels/location_hotels.htm and used that as our base to explore each day. It gave us an easy ride into Stirling and also was close enough to reach the Highlands and explore that. We did drive all the way up to Isle of Skye from there but that was a killer ride for just one day. We should have stayed on Skye for the one night and head back the next day.

If you do go to Aberfoyle, stop at the little butcher shop in front of the woolen center outlet. They make the best bridies. Do not stop at the restaurant right before coming into Aberfolyle. It's at the cross roads of Aberfolye and Loch Lomand. The food and service was terrible. Better places in downtown Aberfolyle.

Traveling up the A-82 to reach the Highlands, make sure you stop at The Green Welly in Tyndrum, http://www.scotchwhisky.net/retail/retailers/green_welly.htm . First of all, it's the last place for many miles, before you can make a stop again. You can fill up your car, have lunch and do some shopping there. Fun place.

I have many pictures in the Gallery of the castles and some of the scenery we passed along the way. I have explanations with all the pictures.

Scotland was very expensive but I wouldn't pass up a return trip.

Thank you very much for the suggestions and all the great URLs. I will keep them for reference and hopefully get to see some of the places you've described. I'll also check out the pictures in the Gallery...one can never get enough of beautful Scottish scenery and castles.

mmmmmm....bridies....yummmmm!

Here's a picture of the view we had outside the bedroom of the MacDonald Forest Hills Hotel & Resort in Aberfoyle.

That's absolutely beautiful.... <sigh>

Posted by: jbarron 04-Jun-2008, 09:24 AM
QUOTE (jbarron @ 29-May-2008, 09:20 AM)
QUOTE (Camac @ 29-May-2008, 08:42 AM)
QUOTE (jbarron @ 28-May-2008, 10:04 AM)
Finduella -

I have a recipe for Cullen Skink...if you're interested, I could post it on the Scottish recipe forum. I don't know if it will be as good as the one you had from Cullen but it's supposedly authentic. It sounds delicious!

biggrin.gif

Hey Guys;
Ihave a recipes also for "Maw Broons' Cullen Skink. " Bluidy Marvellous.


Camac.

If you'd care to - please post it on the recipe forum under Scottish recipes - I'd love to try it!

I'll put the other recipe on there tomorrow too as I don't have it with me.

Yum!

My apologies...I spaced doing this and never posted the recipe. unsure.gif

I will try to get to that very soon.

Posted by: jbarron 04-Jun-2008, 09:27 AM
QUOTE (Camac @ 31-May-2008, 09:23 AM)
Chapter 3.

Well after six hours of being packed into a Flying Sardine Can I arrived at Glasgow Intern'l Airport at 9:30 in the a.m.. After about ten minutes in Immigration and 0 mins in Customs, they were not on duty and I could have smuggled an Atom Bomb into the country, I exited Arrivals arms full of Duty Free, suitcase in tow,to have my ears assailed by the screams of "DAVID,DAVID" followed by two 60 year old women tackling me while a man thumped my back. Thus I was welcomed by my cousin Alister, his wife Linda, and cousin Moira. Admist the hugs, tears, and kisses I was Home and with my Lost Family. Next was the trip to Dundee on the other side of Scotland. It was an 1 1/2 drive on secondary roads through the Scottish countryside, Glasgow to Stirling then North to Dundee crossing over the Tay on the Highway bridge and into Monofeith the suburb where Alister and Linda have a lovely home, not at all what I expected. The rest of the day was spent unpacking and getting settled in and talking for hours getting to know each other.The next morning I was awakened to a breakfast of Bacon and eggs and Black Pudding and coffee. I was definitely home. I had some duties to perform that first day so with Alister, Linda and Moira set off to fufill them. The first stop was "The Law (extinct volcano in the middle of Dundee) to pay Honour to my Father at the War Memorial perched on the summit. From there we went to the Family plot where my Grandparents and my Fathers' brothers and sisters are buried. Here I left a Plaque that read "Cpl. David Campbell, 2Bn., 48th Tank Regiment. Royal Armoured Corp. 15 May 1944, Deli Ibraham, Algiers.
A True Highland Warrior. From his Loving Scots=Canadian Son, David." So ends chapter 3.

PS. One thing the Scots cannae dae is make coffee.

What a wonderful homecoming! It's always been said that the Scots always welcome their kin with open arms and an open house.

The plaque you left for your Dad is very touching. A true Highland warrior indeed. I am sure he would have appreciated that you did that.

Posted by: IrishBeachLassie 05-May-2009, 11:45 PM
I am going with my son next year to Scotland then to Ireland; I have a friend I found on CelticRadio guiding me through the Scotland part and it's B&B's all the way through the parts we choose as a must see; Castles are my thing, and you're right, there are a lot in Scotland, so he's accomodating that, plus some absolutely gorgeous landscape; the B&B's I've contacted are very friendly and helpful, I really wish it was more then 2 weeks but will barely manage to take that off from work; I wish it was sooner. He's sent me some utube sites with different destinations that are very cool, helps to pick and choose where I want to go the most!
good nite all!

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